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Courses for Spring 2020

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
AFRC 001-001 Intro Africana Studies Jasmine Johnson TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM The term Africana emerged in public discourse amid the social, political, and cultural turbulence of the 1960s. The roots of the field, however, are much older,easily reaching back to oral histories and writings during the early days of the Trans-Atlantic African slave trade. The underpinnings of the field continued to grow in the works of enslaved Africans, abolitionists and social critics of the nineteenth century, and evolved in the twentieth century by black writers, journalists, activists, and educators as they sought to document African descended people's lives. Collectively, their work established African Studies as a discipline,epistemological standpoint and political practice dedicated to understanding the multiple trajectories and experiences of black people in the world throughout history. As an ever-transforming field of study, this course will examine the genealogy, major discourses, and future trajectory of Africana Studies. Using primary sources such as maps and letters, as well as literature and performance, our study of Africana will begin with continental Africa, move across the Atlantic during the middle passage and travel from the coasts of Bahia in the 18th century to the streets of Baltimore in the 21st century. The course is constructed around major themes in Black intellectual thought including: retentions and transferal, diaspora, black power, meanings of blackness, uplift and nationalism. While attending to narratives and theories that concern African descended people in the United States, the course is uniquely designed with a focus on gender and provides context for the African diasporic experience in the Caribbean and Latin America. Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Humanities & Social Science Sector</span>
AFRC 002-401 Introduction To Sociology Jerry A Jacobs MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM We live in a country which places a premium on indivi dual accomplishments. Hence, all of you worked extremely hard to get into Penn. Yet, social factors also have an impact on life chance. This class provides an overview of how membership in social groups shapes the outcomes of individuals. We will look at a range of topics from the organizational factors which promoted racial inequality in Ferguson, Mo to the refusal of (mostly elite) parents to vaccinate their children. The experience of women and men in the labor market -- and the social factors that lead women to earn less than men -- is another interesting topic taken up in the course. Who gets ahead in America? Course requirements include a midterm, research paper (five to six pages), final and recitation activities. Students are not expected to have any previous knowledge of the topic. Welcome to the course! SOCI001401 Society sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span>
AFRC 006-401 Race & Ethnic Relations Vani S Kulkarni TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM The course will focus on race and ethnicity in the United States. We begin with a brief history of racial categorization and immigration to the U.S. The course continues by examining a number of topics including racial and ethnic identity, interracial and interethnic friendships and marriage, racial attitudes, mass media images, residential segregation, educational stratification, and labor market outcomes. The course will include discussions of African Americans, Whites, Hispanics, and Asian Americans and Multiracials. SOCI006401, ASAM006401
AFRC 008-401 The Sociology of Black Community Haley Grace Pilgrim T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This course explores a broad set of issues defining important aspects of the Black/African American experience. In addition to the "usual suspects" (e.g., race, socioeconomic status, poverty, gender, and group culture), we also think about matters of health and well-being, the family, education, and identity in Black/African American communities. Our goal is to gain a deeper sociological understanding and appreciation of the diverse and ever-changing life experiences of Blacks/African Americans. SOCI028401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFRC 011-401 Urban Sociology R. Tyson Smith TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course is a comprehensive introduction to the sociological study of urban areas. This includes more general topics as the rise of cities and theories urbanism, as well as more specific areas of inquiry, including American urbanism, segregation, urban poverty, suburbanization and sprawl, neighborhoods and crime, and immigrant ghettos. The course will also devote significant attention to globalization and the process of urbanization in less developed counties. URBS112401, SOCI011401
AFRC 050-401 World Musics & Cultures MWF 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. ANTH022401, MUSC050401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
AFRC 050-402 World Musics & Cultures MWF 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. ANTH022402, MUSC050402 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
AFRC 050-403 World Musics & Cultures Katherine Theresa Larrick Scahill TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. ANTH022403, MUSC050403 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
AFRC 053-401 Online Course: Music of Africa Carol Ann Muller R 05:00 PM-07:00 PM African Contemporary Music: North, South, East, and West. Come to know contemporary Africa through the sounds of its music: from South African kwela, jazz, marabi, and kwaito to Zimbabwean chimurenga; Central African soukous and pygmy pop; West African Fuji, and North African rai and hophop. Through reading and listening to live performance, audio and video recordings, we will examine the music of Africa and its intersections with politics, history, gender, and religion in the colonial and post colonial era. (Formerly Music 053). MUSC051401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
AFRC 062-401 Land of the Pharaohs Josef W Wegner TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM This course provides an introduction to the society, culture and history of ancient Egypt. The objective of the course is to provide an understanding of the characteristics of the civilization of ancient Egypt and how that ancient society succeeded as one of the most successful and long-lived civilizations in world history. NELC062401 History & Tradition Sector (all classes)
AFRC 073-401 The African Diaspora: Global Dimensions Roquinaldo Ferreira MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM This class examines the cultural and social ramifications of the African diaspora on a global level. It is divided into two major sections. The first section provides the historical background to the African diaspora by focusing on the forced migration of Africans to Spanish and Portuguese colonies in the Americas. We will then delve into the black experience in French and British colonial spaces. In this section, we will also endeavor to move beyond the Atlantic-centric paradigm in studies of the African diaspora by examining free and unfree migrations of African people across the Indian Ocean to places as far away as India and the Philippines. The second half of the class devotes significant attention to the historical legacy of slavery and colonialism in places like Brazil, Cuba and the United States. In this section, we will discuss such issues as race relations, the struggle for civil rights for African-descent people as well as the emergence and the implementation of affirmative action policies in places like Brazil and the US. LALS078401, HIST078401
AFRC 075-401 Afr Hist Before 1800 Cheikh Ante MBAcke Babou MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM Survey of major themes and issues in African history before 1800. Topics include: early civilizations, African kingdoms and empires, population movements, the spread of Islam, and the slave trade. Also, emphasis on how historians use archaeology, linguistics, and oral traditions to reconstruct Africa's early history. HIST075401 History & Tradition Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020A&course=AFRC075401
AFRC 077-401 Jazz:Style & History Benjamin Alan Oyler MWF 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course is an exploration of the family of musical idioms called jazz. Attention will be given to issues of style development, selective musicians, and to the social and cultural conditions and the scholarly discourses that have informed the creation, dissemination and reception of this dynamic set of styles from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. Fulfills Cultural Diversity in the U.S. MUSC035401
AFRC 078-401 Faculty-Student Collaborative Action Seminar in Urban Univ-Comm Relations Ira Harkavy W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM One of the goals of this seminar is to help students develop their capacity to solve strategic, real-world problems by working collaboratively in the classroom, on campus, and in the West Philadelphia community. Research teams help contribute to the improvement of education on campus and in the community, as well as the improvement of university-community relations. Among other responsibilities, students focus their community service on college and career readiness at West Philadelphia High School and Sayre High School. Students are typically engaged in academically based community service learning at the schools for two hours each week. HIST173401, URBS178401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">An Academically Based Community Serv Course</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Benjamin Franklin Seminars</span>
AFRC 081-401 Introduction To African American Literature Dagmawi Woubshet TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM An introduction to African-American literature, typically ranging across a wide spectrum of moments, methodologies, and ideological postures, from Reconstruction and the Harlem Renaissance to the Civil Rights Movement. Most versions of this course will begin in the 19th century; some versions of the course will concentrate only on the modern period. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. ENGL081401
AFRC 101-401 Study of An Author: Toni Morrison Herman Beavers TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course introduces students to literary study through the works of a single author--often Shakespeare, but other versions will feature writers like Jane Austen, Geoffrey Chaucer, Herman Melville, and August Wilson. Readings an individual author across his or her entire career offers students the rare opportunity to examine works from several critical perspectives in a single course. What is the author's relation to his or her time? How do our author's works help us to understand literary history more generally? And how might be understand our author's legacy through performance, tributes, adaptations, or sequels? Exposing students to a range of approaches and assignments, this course is an ideal introduction to literary study for those students wishing to take an English course but not necessarily intending to major. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. GSWS101401, ENGL101401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
AFRC 122-401 Pop Cultr & Youth in Afr: Popular Culture and Youth in Africa Mary Jennifer Hasty MW 12:00 PM-01:30 PM All across the continent, Africa is alive with the energies of young people, expressed in music, art, fashion, drama, video, poetry, protest, and urban legends. In this course, we take a close look at the wide variety of popular forms produced and consumed by young people in a diversity of contexts, urban and rural, elite and marginal, mainstream and transgressive. We will examine how popular culture draws from African tradition to craft innovative versions of modernity and futurity. We will explore themes of democracy, inequality, and social justice threaded through popular genres as well as experiences of joy, anger, fear, and hilarity. We will see how popular culture provides escape and entertainment for young people while also working to transform African societies. ANTH120401
AFRC 123-401 Adv Writing For Children Lorene E Cary W 04:30 PM-07:30 PM This is a course for students who have completed either English 121 or at least one other creative writing class. We will focus on writing works for children from early chapter books to older teen fiction and the importance of creating compelling charaters, a good plot, excellence pacing, a distinctive voice, and an appropriate theme with the goal of each student refining an existing project or beginning work on a new one. There will be at least one reading and one writing assignment each week. Exercises may include studies in voice, point of view, plot development, humor, description, developing a fantasy world, writing historical fiction, or memior. Class work will include reading a wide variety of published work for children and/or young adults, from chapter books to novels, as examples of the genre. Prerequisite: This is a course for students who have completed either ENGLISH 121 or at least one other Creative Writing class. On the side, for funsies, and to assuage the must-write fast urge, you will also write bits and blogs. ENGL123401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">An Academically Based Community Serv Course</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020A&course=AFRC123401
AFRC 135-401 Law & Society Hocine Fetni W 06:30 PM-09:30 PM After introducing students to the major theoretical concepts concerning law and society, significant controversial societal issues that deal with law and the legal systems both domestically and internationally will be examined. Class discussions will focus on issues involving civil liberties, the organization of courts, legislatures, the legal profession and administrative agencies. Although the focus will be on law in the United States, law and society in other countries of Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America will be covered in a comparative context. Readings include research, reports, statutes and cases. SOCI135401
AFRC 135-601 Law & Society Hocine Fetni T 06:30 PM-09:30 PM After introducing students to the major theoretical concepts concerning law and society, significant controversial societal issues that deal with law and the legal systems both domestically and internationally will be examined. Class discussions will focus on issues involving civil liberties, the organization of courts, legislatures, the legal profession and administrative agencies. Although the focus will be on law in the United States, law and society in other countries of Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America will be covered in a comparative context. Readings include research, reports, statutes and cases. SOCI135601
AFRC 149-680 Elementary Zulu: Accl Audrey N. Mbeje TR 06:00 PM-09:00 PM The Accelerated Elementary Zulu course is intensive, and can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on South Africa, Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicaive competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everydaylife situations to enable he students to communicae in predictable commom daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the ceiling of low intermediate level and floor of high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The low intermediate level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the third semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Intermediate Zulu I course materials. AFST549680, AFRC549680, AFST149680
AFRC 152-680 Elementary Zulu II Audrey N. Mbeje MW 03:00 PM-05:00 PM The Elementary Zulu II course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on South Africa, Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the ceiling of low intermediate level and floor of high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The low intermediate level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the third semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Intermediate Zulu I course materials. AFST551680, AFST151680
AFRC 163-680 Elementary Twi II Kobina Ofosu-Donkoh TR 04:30 PM-06:30 PM Continuation of AFST 160. AFST565680, AFST161680
AFRC 169-401 History of American Law Sarah B Gordon TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM This course covers the development of legal rules and principles concerning individual and group conduct in the United States since 1877. Such subjects as regulation and deregulation, legal education and the legal profession, and the legal status of women and minorities will be discussed. HIST169401
AFRC 171-680 Elementary Yoruba II Yiwola Awoyale MW 05:00 PM-07:00 PM The main objective of this course is to further sharpen the Yoruba linguistic knowledge that the student acquired in level I. By the end of the course, the student should be able to (1) read, write, and understand simple to moderately complex sentences in Yoruba; and, (2) advance in the knowledge of the Yoruba culure. AFST518680, AFRC517680, AFST171680
AFRC 177-401 Afro Amer Hist 1876-Pres Mia E Bay TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM A study of the major events, issues, and personalities in Afro-American history from Reconstruction to the present. The course will also examine the different slave experiences and the methods of black resistance and rebellion in the various slave systems. HIST177401 History & Tradition Sector (all classes)
AFRC 181-680 Elementary Swahili II Elaine Mshomba TR 12:00 PM-02:00 PM This course continues to introduce basic grammar, vocabulary, and the reading and writing of Swahili to new speakers. During this term, folktales, other texts, and film selections are used to help introduce important aspects of Swahili culture and the use of the language in wide areas of Africa. AFST581680, AFST181680
AFRC 187-301 The History of Women and Men of African Descent At the University of Penn Brian Peterson
Charles L Howard
M 11:00 AM-02:00 PM Topics Vary. See the Africana Studies Program's website at www.sas.upenn.edu/africana for a description of the current offerings. SPRING 2017: The history of the women and men of African Descent who have studied, taught, researched, and worked at the University of Pennsylvania provides a powerful window into the complex history of Blacks not only in America but throughout the Diaspora. This class will unpack, uncover, and present this history through close studies of texts and archived records on and at the university, as well as through first hand accounts by alumni and past and present faculty and staff members. These stories of the trials and triumphs of individuals on and around this campus demonstrate the amazing and absurd experience that Blacks have endured both at Penn and globally. Emphasis will be placed on the research process with the intent of creating a democratic classroom where all are students and all are instructors. Students will become familiar with archival historical research (and historical criticism) as well as with ethnographic research. Far more than just a survey of historical moments on campus and in the community, students will meet face to face with those who have lived and are presently living history and they will be faced with the challenge of discerning the most effective ways of documenting, protecting, and representing that history for future generations of Penn students. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info</span>
AFRC 202-401 Spirit Possession in the Caribbean Eziaku Nwokocha T 03:00 PM-06:00 PM This course is designed to provide students with a broad introduction to possession experiences in Caribbean Religions. Through historical, ethnographic, autobiographical, literary and visual texts this course examines complex, gendered practices within the possession process, the vibrant spiritual energy that sustains communal connections during religious ceremonies, and the transnational imaginations that animate Caribbean religious practices in the Americas. Special attention will be given to Santeria, Candomble, Vodou, Myal, Palo Monte, and Revival Zion in the Americas. Possession is a process through which gender and sexuality can be performed, contesting national and regional discourses of sexuality, gender, and race in the Caribbean. Thematically, we will work through concepts of memory, community, adornment, ritual, borders, and the senses. We will investigate religious ritual practices to understand various religious worldviews that shape communities' religious and social lives. GSWS202401
AFRC 209-601 African Art Imani Roach W 05:00 PM-08:00 PM This selective survey will examine a variety of the circumstances of sub-Saharan African art, ranging from imperial to nomadic cultures and from ancient times to comtemporary participation in the international market. Iconography, themes and style will be considered, as will questions of modernity, religious impact, tradition and colonialism. ARTH209601
AFRC 218-401 Diversity & the Law Jose F. Anderson M 03:00 PM-06:00 PM The goal of this course is to study the role the law has played, and continues to play, in addressing the problems of racial discrimination in the United States. Contemporary issues such as racial profiling, affirmative action, and diversity will all be covered in their social and legal context. The basis for discussion will be assigned texts, articles, editorials and cases. In addition, interactive videos will also be used to aid class discussion. Course requirements will include a term paper and class case presentations. LGST218401 http://syllabi.wharton.upenn.edu/?term=2009A&course=AFRC218401
AFRC 222-401 Afr Women Lives Past/Pre: African Women Lives Past and Present Pamela Blakely T 04:30 PM-07:30 PM Restoring women to African history is a worthy goal, but easier said than done.The course examines scholarship over the past forty years that brings to light previously overlooked contributions African women have made to political struggle, religious change, culture preservation, and economic development from pre-colonial times to present. The course addresses basic questions about changing women's roles and human rights controversies associated with African women within the wider cultural and historical contexts in which their lives are lived. It also raises fundamental questions about sources, methodology, and representation, including the value of African women's oral and written narrative and cinema production as avenues to insider perspectives on African women's lives. GSWS222401
AFRC 225-301 African Language and Culture Audrey N. Mbeje TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM The aim of the course is to provide an overall perspective on African languages and linguistics. No background in linguistics is necessary. Students will be introduced to theoretical linguistics-its concepts, theories, ways of argumentation, data collection, data analysis, and data interpretation. The focus will be on the languages and linguistics of Africa to provide you with the knowledge and skills required to handle the language and language-related issues typical of African conditions. We will cover topics related to formal linguistics (phonology/phonetics, morphology, syntax, and semantics), aspects of pragmatics as well as the general socio-linguistic character of African countries. We will also cover language in context, language and culture, borrowing, multilingualism, and cross-cultural communication in Africa.
AFRC 234-404 Abolitionism: A Global History Roquinaldo Ferreira R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. This class develops a transnational and global approach to the rise of abolitionism in the nineteenth century. In a comparative framework, the class traces the rise of abolitionism in Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Asia, examining the suppression of the transatlantic slave trade, the rise of colonialism in Africa, and the growth of forced labor in the wake of transatlantic slave trade. We will deal with key debates in the literature of African, Atlantic and Global histories, including the causes and motivations of abolitionism, the relationship between the suppression of the slave trade and the growth of forced labor in Africa, the historical ties between abolitionism and the early stages of colonialism in Africa, the flow of indentured laborers from Asia to the Americas in the wake of the slave trade. This class is primarily geared towards the production of a research paper. *Depending on the research paper topic, History Majors and Minors can use this course to fulfill the US, Europe, Latin America or Africa requirement.* LALS233404, HIST233404
AFRC 235-401 Law and Social Change Hocine Fetni TR 04:30 PM-06:00 PM Beginning with discussion of various perspectives on social change and law, this course then examines in detail the interdependent relationship between changes in legal and societal institutions. Emphasis will be placed on (1) how and when law can be an instrument for social change, and (2) how and when social change can cause legal change. In the assessment of this relationship, emphasis will be on the laws of the United States. However, laws of other countries and international law relevant to civil liberties, economic, social and political progress will be studied. Throughout the course, discussions will include legal controversies relevant to social change such as issues of race, gender and the law. Other issues relevant to State-Building and development will be discussed. A comparative framework will be used in the analysis of this interdependent relationship between law and social change. SOCI235401
AFRC 238-401 Modalities of Black Freedom and Escape: Ships Grace Louise B Sanders Johnson M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM The course circulates around ships and boats. The course combines methods from environmental humanities, visual arts and history to consider multi-modal practices of black freedom and escape. From free black sailors in the eighteenth century Caribbean Sea, to twentieth and twenty-first century West African fishing boats, notions of Haitian "boat people," Parliament Funkadelic's mothership, and sinking boats with Somali and Ethiopian migrants off Yemen's coast, ships have been and remain technologies of containment and freedom for communities of African descent. In the face of environmental vulnerabilities and the reality of water ways as systems of sustenance and imminent death, this course asks: how do black people use the ship and the process and practice of shipping as vessels for freedom, escape, and as a site to experiment with futures? Using the city of Philadelphia and the Schuylkill and Delaware rivers as our primary site of interrogation, the course attends to the threats that black people experience following natural disaster (New Orleans, Haiti, Puerto Rico) and everyday engagement with the local and global state structures regarding water (Flint, MI). In this context, we also look to shipping as a site to theorize and account for black innovation, meanings of (non-)sovereignty, and alternative futures. ANTH231401
AFRC 241-680 Elementary Amharic II Yohannes Hailu MW 05:30 PM-07:30 PM Continuation of Elementary Amharic I. Amharic belongs to the southern branch of Hemeto-Semitic languages, which is also referred to as "Afrasian." Amharic is the official language of Ethiopia and is spoken by 14 million native Amharas and by approximately 18 million of the other groups in Ethiopia. This course continues to introduce basic grammar, vocabulary, and the reading and writing of Amharic to new speakers. AFST541680, AFRC541680, AFST241680, NELC482680
AFRC 243-680 Intermediate Amharic II Yohannes Hailu MW 07:30 PM-09:00 PM AFST544680, AFRC544680, AFST243680, NELC484680
AFRC 245-301 Dancing the African Diaspora Jasmine Johnson W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This seminar/studio course introduces students to theories, debates, and critical frameworks in African Diaspora Dance Studies. It asks: What role does dance play throughout the African diaspora? What makes a dance 'black'? How do conceptualizations of gender and sexuality inform our reading of dancing bodies? Using African diaspora, critical dance, performance, and black feminist frameworks, we will examine the history, politics, and aesthetics of "black dance". Through a keywords format, we'll construct both a vocabulary: a body of words used to describe a phenomena, and a grammar: a body of rules that lay bare the operations between terms. This course recognizes the fluidity of meaning between words depending on the context, geography, and circumstance of their evocation. Our key terms will allow us to examine a number of dancers, choreographers, companies, and movement practices. Moving across an African diasporic map, this course explores the politics of black choreography, and the political significance of black bodies in motion.
AFRC 251-680 Intermediate Zulu II Audrey N. Mbeje TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM AFST553680, AFST251680
AFRC 265-680 Intermediate Twi II Kobina Ofosu-Donkoh TR 06:30 PM-08:00 PM AFST263680
AFRC 271-680 Intermediate Yoruba II Yiwola Awoyale TR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM AFST532680, AFST271680, AFRC534680
AFRC 277-401 Penn Slavery Project Res Alexis Neumann
Kathleen M Brown
R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This research seminar provides students with instruction in basic historical methods and an opportunity to conduct collaborative primary source research into the University of Pennsylvania's historic connections to slavery. After an initial orientation to archival research, students will plunge in to doing actual research at the Kislak Center, the University Archives, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the American Philosophical Society, the Library Company, and various online sources. During the final month of the semester, students will begin drafting research reports and preparing for a public presentation of the work. During the semester, there will be opportunities to collaborate with a certified genealogist, a data management and website expert, a consultant on public programming, and a Penn graduate whose research has been integral to the Penn Slavery Project. HIST273401
AFRC 279-401 (T)Rap Music Simone White W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course examines the coming to pass of trap music from several perspectives: 1) that of its technological foundations and innovations (the Roland 808, Auto-tune, FL Studio (FruityLoops), etc.); 2) that of its masters/mastery (its transformation of stardom through the figures of the producer (Metro Boomin) and the rock star (Future)); 3) that of its interpretability and effects (what does the music say and do to us). We will thus engage with this music as a practice of art and form of techno-sociality that manifests uncanny and maximal attunement with the now. ENGL282401
AFRC 282-680 Intermediate Swahili II Elaine Mshomba TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM At the end of the course students will be at Level 2 on the ILR (Interagency Language Roundtable) scale. AFST583680, AFST281680
AFRC 285-680 Advanced Swahili II Elaine Mshomba TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM The objectives are to continue to strengthen students' knowledge of speaking, listening, reading, and writing Swahili and to compare it with the language of the students; to continue learning about the cultures of East Africa and to continue making comparisons with the culture(s) of the students; to continue to consider the relationship between that knowledge and the knowledge of other disciplines; and using that knowledge, to continue to unite students with communities outside of class. Level 3 on the ILR (Interagency Language Roundtable) scale. AFST285680, AFST586680
AFRC 302-301 Sustainable Entrepreneurship Tanji Gilliam W 12:00 PM-03:00 PM This course is designed to introduce students to the multiple methods of engaging Africana entrepreneurship, public service and philanthropy. Alongside a thorough review of both popular and independent activist media, students will be trained to use accessible technology to participate in international communications networks. "Big ideas," will be translated into succinct artistic statements. We will look intimately at the architecture of David Adjaye, Adjaye Associates; the initiatives of Majora Carter for Sustainable South Bronx and Majora Carter Group; the philanthropic equity of Vista Equity Partners and C.E.O. Robert Smith, and the political work of Mayor Ras Baraka, City of Newark among other examples from the public and private sector throughout the African Diaspora. Prior to the development of our own app ideas, we will focus on the urban market advertising strategies of majority companies that are lauded for their sustainable initiatives including Nike, Hewlett-Packard and Apple. We will also use as secondary resources macro approaches to sustainability from the United Nations Foundation. This course makes an argument for inclusion of race, class and gender equity in the evolving definition of sustainability. Our argument, consistent with the growth of so many of these professionals inside of and clearly influenced by hip-hop culture, is that they are best prepared, culturally, to "make something out of nothing."
AFRC 307-401 Race, Science & Justice Dorothy E Roberts MW 04:00 PM-05:00 PM This course draws on an interdisciplinary body of biological and social scientific literature to explore critically the connections between race, science, and justice in the United States, including scientific theories of racial inequality, from the eighteenth century to the genomic age. After investigating varying concepts of race, as well as their uses in eugenics, criminology, anthropology, sociology, neuroscience, and medicine, we will focus on the recent expansion of genomic research and technologies that treat race as a biological category that can be identified at the molecular level, including race-specific pharmaceuticals, commercial ancestry testing, and racial profiling with DNA forensics. We will discuss the significance of scientific investigations of racial difference for advancing racial justice in the United States. SOCI307401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span>
AFRC 311-401 Medicine, Health, and Healing in Africa David K. Amponsah T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This seminar course will examine how sub-Saharan Africans have interpreted and dealt with issues of health, healing, and medicine under colonial and postcolonial regimes. It will also look at how various social, economic, religious, and political factors have impacted health and healing on the continent and shaped African responses. Class discussions will center around both general themes affecting health and healing in Africa as well as case studies drawn from historical and anthropological works. HIST376401
AFRC 316-401 Africa and Roman Lit Amy Susanna Lewis TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM In this course, we will explore race and ethnicity in the Roman world by focusing on the life and works of Roman Africans and the ways in which non-African Romans engaged with and presented the peoples of Africa. The course covers Roman literature in translation from the comedies of Plautus produced in the late 3rd - 2nd centuries BCE, to African Christian writing of the 5th century CE. It also covers a wide range of genres: we will examine how Roman writers articulate questions of race in comedy and satire, epic, history, biography, and elegy among others. We will read African writers (Apuleius, Augustine) and ask how their Africanness influences their works. We will read Roman accounts of journeys to Africa, wars with Africa, and encounters with Africans to ask how the Romans saw themselves as different from or similar to Africans. The course will also explore in more general terms how Romans talk about race: did racism exist? What aspects of different cultures and peoples did Romans choose to emphasize when they talked of non-Romans? CLST316401, ANCH316401
AFRC 321-301 War and Peace in Africa Ali B. Ali-Dinar TR 03:00 PM-04:20 PM The end of colonial rule was the springboard for the start of cold wars in various regions of Africa. Where peace could not be maintained violence erupted. Even where secession has been attained, as in the new country of South Sudan, the threat of civil war lingers. While domestic politics have led to the rise of armed conflicts and civil wars in many African countries, the external factors should also not be ignored. Important in all current conflicts is the concern to international peace and security. Overall this course will: (1) investigate the general nature of armed conflicts in Africa (2) provide in-depth analysis of the underlying factors (3) and discuss the regional and the international responses to these conflicts and their implications. Special emphasis will be placed upon African conflicts and civil wars in: great Lakes area, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Sudan, Somalia, South Sudan, and Uganda. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020A&course=AFRC321301
AFRC 332-401 N.Africa:Hist,Cultr,Soc Heather Sharkey M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This interdisciplinary seminar aims to introduce students to the countries of North Africa, with a focus on the Maghreb and Libya (1830-present). It does so while examining the region's close economic and cultural connections to sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and the Middle East. Readings will include histories, political analyses, anthropological studies, and novels, and will cover a wide range of topics such as colonial and postcolonial experiences, developments in Islamic thought and practice, and labor migration. This class is intended for juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Prerequisite: A university-level survey course in Middle Eastern, African, or Meditterranean history. NELC332401, HIST370401, NELC632401
AFRC 340-401 Money, Power, Respect: Funding For Social Change Roz Lee R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This course is about how to apply a race, gender and LGBTQ lens to support contemporary social justice movements in the U.S. and globally, including Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, transgender equality, and disability justice. We will explore intersectionality as a theoretical framework, and how it is practically applied to support social justice organizations and leaders, and fund social change. Over the course of the semester, Professor of Practice Roz Lee, a black lesbian feminist and lifelong racial, gender, LGBTQ and economic justice advocate, and who currently serves as Vice President of Strategy and Programs at the Ms. Foundation for Women, will be joined by movement leaders and philanthropy colleagues to discuss and analyze what's happening on the frontlines of movements for equity, justice and freedom. GSWS340401
AFRC 343-401 Global Health Seminar: Culture, Development and Health in Ghana Robin Stevens
Anastasia M. Shown
F 09:00 AM-12:00 PM This course will be a broad overview on current health, culture and development topics in Ghana. The health segment will focus on the experience, treatment and impact of sickle cell anemia. The course will cover basic principles of Ghanaian culture as it relates to health and development. The first part of the class will be taught through lectures, case studies, discussions on campus and a local field trip in the Philadelphia area. The second part of the course will involve a field trip to Ghana during spring break to help students gain a global perspective on a health and development topics that impact Africans across the diaspora. For more information: https://global.upenn.edu/pennabroad/pgs. This course is a broad overview of current health, culture and development topics with a focus on Ghana. The first part of the class will be taught through lectures, case studies, discussions on campus and a local field trip. One of the health issues we will examine thoroughly is sickle cell anemia and its impact on Africans across the diaspora. The second part of the course will include a trip to Ghana over spring break to help students gain a global perspective on health and development topics. Students will receive lectures from Ghanaian faculty and professionals and partner with university students at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology in Kumasi. Students from both universities will engage with community members during visits to schools, health clinics, and development projects. Students will explore heritage sites and make connections between cultures and shared histories. All students must apply through the Penn Global Seminar Website for permission to register for this course. Those who are accepted will receive a permit to register for this course. NURS343401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Instructor</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Global Seminar</span>
AFRC 343-402 Global Health Seminar: Environmental Health Issues and Global Implications Jianghong Liu This course will be a broad overview on current health, culture and development topics in Ghana. The health segment will focus on the experience, treatment and impact of sickle cell anemia. The course will cover basic principles of Ghanaian culture as it relates to health and development. The first part of the class will be taught through lectures, case studies, discussions on campus and a local field trip in the Philadelphia area. The second part of the course will involve a field trip to Ghana during spring break to help students gain a global perspective on a health and development topics that impact Africans across the diaspora. For more information: https://global.upenn.edu/pennabroad/pgs. NURS543402, NURS343402
AFRC 351-680 Advanced Zulu II Lindiwe Magaya MW 11:30 AM-01:00 PM AFST555680, AFST351680
AFRC 364-680 Advanced Twi II Kobina Ofosu-Donkoh AFST569680, AFST363680
AFRC 373-401 The History of Foreign Aid in Africa Lee V Cassanelli M 03:30 PM-06:30 PM This course examines the history, politics, and significance of foreign aid to Africa since the late 19th century. While we do not typically think about the European colonial period in Africa in terms of 'foreign aid,' that era introduced ideas and institutions which formed the foundations for modern aid policies and practices. So we start there and move forward into more contemporary times. In addition to examining the objectives behind foreign assistance and the intentions of donors and recipients, we will look at some of the consequences (intended or unintended) of various forms of foreign aid to Africa over the past century. While not designed to be a comprehensive history of development theory, of African economics, or of international aid organizations, the course will touch on all of these topics. Previous coursework on Africa is strongly advised. HIST372401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020A&course=AFRC373401
AFRC 382-401 Blackness in Latin American Visual Culture, 16th-19th Centuries Helen Melling MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM The presence of Africans and their descendants produced a complex visual culture in colonial and 19th century Latin America. This course introduces students to a rich body of imagery from the Spanish and Portuguese-speaking Americas in order to explore the multiplicity of meanings ascribed to Blackness across the region; from colonial conceptions rooted in lineage and bloodlines, to the construction of race as an material and biological 'fact' in the 19th century. Sources include the casta paintings of colonial Mexico, fashion and material culture, the popular iconography and print culture forged by costumbrismo, and late 19th century photography. Focusing on several countries including Brazil, Cuba, Mexico and Peru, this seminar provides a thematic exploration of these sources through topics including slavery, citizenship, national identities, religion, self-fashioning and resistance. The aim is to explore how ideas of Blackness were configured, imposed and remade, through representations of Afrodescendants in the visual arts, and the production and use of visual and material culture in Black self-fashioning and collective identities. LALS382401, ARTH308401
AFRC 392-401 Queering North African Subjectivities Alexandra Sofia Gueydan-Turek M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This seminar will explore the ways in which literary and visual representations of sexual difference and gender roles disrupt the cultural imagination of everyday life in North Africa and its Diasporas. Special attention will be given to representations of Arab women and queer subjectivities as sites of resistance against dominant masculinity. We will analyze the ways in which representations of gender have allowed for a redeployment of power, a reconfiguration of politics of resistance, and the redrawing of longstanding images of Islam in France. Finally, we will question how creations that straddle competing cultural traditions, memories and material conditions can queer citizenship. Course taught in English. FREN392401, COML393401, GSWS392401
AFRC 404-301 Black Geographies and the Meaning of Land Rights Sarah Franzen R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This course will interweave issues of land dispossession and land rights, both in Africa and in the Americas, with endogenous concepts and practices of space and place. Specifically, this course will trace the the concept of property, as developed among Europeans and European descendants, and explore how this concept interacted with the formation of the concept of race in order to established forms of social control and domination. The first part of this course will focus on Africa generally using Kenya as a case study. The material will cover the impact of colonialism and its legacy on land rights after independence. This first part will also explore contemporary forms of land dispossession happening through international land investments, often termed land grabs. The second part of the course will turn to the experiences of African descendants in the Americas. Using a few case studies, this section will examine different countries, histories, and rural and urban areas to unravel how different types of control over land interact with social relationships and specifically with the formation of race and racism. In both sections, we will also look at forms of resistance and resilience as local populations demand not only access to and control over land, but also impose their own ideologies of what it means to occupy space. By the end of this course, students should be able to more fully articulate the significance of control over land as it impacts and effects social relationships and specifically how it relates to the formation and continuation of inequalities along racial lines. Students will apply the concepts learned throughout the course to their own independent research done on an area in Philadelphia or Pennsylvania.
AFRC 405-401 Religion, Social Justice & Urban Development Andrew T. Lamas M 06:00 PM-09:00 PM Urban development has been influenced by religious conceptions of social and economic justice. Progressive traditions within Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, Baha'i, Humanism and other religions and systems of moral thought have yielded powerful critiques of oppression and hierarchy as well as alternative economic frameworks for ownership, governance, production, labor, and community. Historical and contemporary case studies from the Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East will be considered, as we examine the ways in which religious responses to poverty, inequality, and ecological destruction have generated new forms of resistance and development. RELS439401, URBS405401
AFRC 420-401 Adv Tpcs in Africana Std: the US and Human Rights: Policies and Practices Hocine Fetni R 06:00 PM-09:00 PM Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's course list at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offering. After an examination of the philosophical, legal, and political perspectives on Human Rights, this course will focus on US policies and practices relevant to Human Rights. Toward that end, emphasis will be placed on both the domestic and the international aspects of Human Rights as reflected in US policies and practices. Domestically, the course will discuss (1) the process of incorporating the International Bill of Human Rights into the American legal system and (2) the US position on and practices regarding the political, civil, economic, social, and cultural rights of minorities and various other groups within the US. Internationally, the course will examine US Human Rights policies toward Africa. Specific cases of Rwanda, Kenya, South Africa and Egypt, as well as other cases from the continent, will be presented in the assessment of US successes and failures in the pursuit of its Human Rights strategy in Africa. Readings will include research papers, reports, statutes, treaties, and cases. SOCI460401
AFRC 437-401 Race & Criminal Justice Marie Gottschalk T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Why are African Americans and some other minority groups disproportionately incarcerated and subjected to penal sanctions? What are the political, social and economic consequences for individuals, communities, and the wider society of mass incarceration in the United States? What types of reforms of the criminal justice system are desirable and possible? This advanced seminar analyzes the connection between race, crime, punishment, and politics in the United States. The primary focus is on the role of race in explaining why the country's prison population increased six-fold since the early 1970s and why the United States today has the highest incarceration rate in the world. The class will likely take field trips to a maximum-security jail in Philadelphia and to a state prison in the Philadelphia suburbs. AFRC638401, PSCI437401, PSCI638401
AFRC 448-401 Neighborhood Displacement & Community Power Walter D Palmer W 06:00 PM-09:00 PM This course uses the history of black displacement to examine community power and advocacy. It examines the methods of advocacy (e.g. case, class, and legislative) and political action through which community activists can influence social policy development and community and institutional change. The course also analyzes selected strategies and tactics of change and seeks to develop alternative roles in the group advocacy, lobbying, public education and public relations, electoral politics, coalition building, and legal and ethical dilemmas in political action. Case studies of neighborhood displacement serve as central means of examing course topics. URBS448401
AFRC 491-681 Afrc Lang Tutor: Elem II: Igbo-Afr Lang Elem II Chika Nwadiora TR 05:00 PM-07:00 PM Continuation of AFST 490. Offered through Penn Language Center. Prerequisite: Permission of Penn Language Center. AFST491681 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>
AFRC 491-682 Afrc Lang Tutor: Elem II: Wolof-Afr Lang Elem II MBAcke Thioune TR 05:00 PM-07:00 PM Continuation of AFST 490. Offered through Penn Language Center. Prerequisite: Permission of Penn Language Center. AFST491682
AFRC 491-683 Afrc Lang Tutor: Elem II: Tigrinya - Elem II Ermias Zemichael TR 05:00 PM-07:00 PM Continuation of AFST 490. Offered through Penn Language Center. Prerequisite: Permission of Penn Language Center. AFST491683
AFRC 491-686 Afrc Lang Tutor: Elem II: Malagasy-Afr Lg Elem II Alex Paul Delbar TR 07:00 PM-09:00 PM Continuation of AFST 490. Offered through Penn Language Center. Prerequisite: Permission of Penn Language Center. AFST491686
AFRC 493-681 Afr Lang Tutor: Intrm II: Igbo-Afr Lang Inter II Chika Nwadiora TR 07:30 PM-09:00 PM Continuation of AFST 492. Prerequisite: Permission of Penn Language Center. AFST493681 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>
AFRC 493-682 Afr Lang Tutor: Intrm II: Wolof-Afr Lang Inter II MBAcke Thioune MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM Continuation of AFST 492. Prerequisite: Permission of Penn Language Center. AFST597682, AFST493682
AFRC 493-683 Afr Lang Tutor: Intrm II: Tigrinya - Inter II Ermias Zemichael TR 07:30 PM-09:00 PM Continuation of AFST 492. Prerequisite: Permission of Penn Language Center. AFST493683
AFRC 493-686 Afr Lang Tutor: Intrm II: Malagasy - Inter II Travis Aldous MW 07:00 PM-09:00 PM Continuation of AFST 492. Prerequisite: Permission of Penn Language Center. AFST493686
AFRC 495-683 Afr Lang Tutor: Adv II: Tigrinya-Afr Lang Adv II Ermias Zemichael TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Continuation of AFST 494. AFST495683
AFRC 495-686 Afr Lang Tutor: Adv II: Advanced Malagasy II Continuation of AFST 494.
AFRC 497-681 Language & Culture II: Igbo Lang & Culture II Chika Nwadiora Continuation of AFST 496. Prerequisite: Permission of Penn Language Center. AFST497681
AFRC 509-401 Reading Historical Arabic Manuscripts Ali B. Ali-Dinar W 03:00 PM-06:00 PM Arabic language is used by many societies not only in communication but also in correspondence and in documenting the affairs of their daily lives. Arabic script is adopted by many groups whose native languages are not Arabic, in writing their languages before some moved to the Roman alphabet. In many historical documents specific style of writing and handwriting are dominant. This specificity is influenced by the dialectical variations, the historical development of each region and the level of Arabic literacy and use. The aims of this course which will focus on the Arabic writing tradition of Africa and the Middle East are as follows: (1) Reading and interpreting hand-written Arabic documents from Africa and the Middle East with focus on different historical eras. (2) In-depth understanding of the historical and language contexts of the selected documents. (3) Examining different handwriting styles that are in vogue in Africa and the Middle East. ARAB580401
AFRC 517-680 Elementary Yoruba II Yiwola Awoyale MW 05:00 PM-07:00 PM The main objective of this course is to further sharpen the Yoruba linquistic knowledge that the student acquired in level I. By the end of the course, the student should be able to (1) read, write, and understand simple to moderately complex sentences in Yoruba; and (2) advance in the knowledge of the Yoruba culture. AFRC171680, AFST518680, AFST171680
AFRC 518-401 Pentecostalism in the Americas Andrew Sinclair Hudson TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM From Marvin Gaye, to Tammy Faye Baker, to Sarah Palin and James Baldwin, Pentecostalism has influenced many, including politicians, preachers, writers, and the media. One of the fastest growing religious movements in the world, Pentecostalism continues to have a profound effect on the religious landscape. Pentecostalism's unique blend of charismatic worship, religious practices, and flamboyant, media-savvy leadership, has drawn millions into this understudies and often controversial religious movement. This course will chronicle the inception and growth of Pentecostalism in the United States, giving particular attention to beliefs, practices, gender, ethnicity, and Global Pentecostalism. RELS517401
AFRC 522-401 Psych of African-American: Implications For Counseling & Human Development Howard C. Stevenson T 12:00 PM-02:00 PM Using an Afro-centric philosophical understanding of the world, this course will focus on psychological issues related to African Americans, including the history of African American psychology, its application across the life span, and contemporary community issues. EDUC522401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Undergraduates Need Permission</span>
AFRC 527-401 Market Women, Madames,Mistresses & Mother Superior Grace Louise B Sanders Johnson T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Market Women, Madames, Mistresses & Mother Superior studies gender, labor, sexuality, and race in the Caribbean. In our historical examination of primary source documents alongside literature, and popular media, we will question some of the iconic representations of Caribbean and Latin American women in order to understand the meaning, purpose and usages of these women s bodies as objects of praise, possession, obsession and/or ridicule by communities, governments and religions within and outside of the region. Beginning in the late-18th century and ending with contemporary migration narratives, this course considers the relationship between slave society and colonial pasts on gender performance in the modern Caribbean, Latin America, and their diasporas. GSWS527401, LALS527401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Undergraduates Need Permission</span>
AFRC 534-680 Intermediate Yoruba II Yiwola Awoyale TR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM AFST532680, AFRC271680, AFST271680
AFRC 541-680 Elementary Amharic II Yohannes Hailu MW 05:30 PM-07:30 PM Continuation of Elementary Amharic I. AFRC241680, AFST541680, AFST241680, NELC482680
AFRC 542-401 Archiving Jazz Herman Beavers M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This seminar will be organized around three distinct pathways. First, it will serve as an introduction to Jazz Studies and thus be attentive to the ways that jazz music has sparked an interdisciplinary conversation that is wide-ranging and ongoing. Second, we will be partnering with the African American Museum of Philadelphia to consider jazz within the realm of visual art. In light of efforts to map the "black interior," how have visual artists (e.g. painters, sculptors, filmmakers, and photographers) sought to represent jazz? Third, we will endeavor to develop partnerships with the Philadelphia (and beyond) jazz community, especially as it pertains to creating and sustaining an archive that serves as way to understand jazz as an instrument of placemaking and also as a vehicle for jazz musicians to take ownership of their narratives. The seminar will meet at the African American Museum of Philadelphia and be team taught with members of the Museum staff. The course will culminate with a virtual exhibit of visual works and archival materials centering on Philadelphia's jazz community and (if funding is available) a free concert to be held at AAMP. Undergraduates are welcome to register for the course with permission of the instructor. MUSC542401, URBS542401, ARTH519401, ENGL541401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Instructor</span>
AFRC 544-680 Intermediate Amharic II Yohannes Hailu MW 07:30 PM-09:00 PM Offered through the Penn Language Center AFRC243680, AFST544680, AFST243680, NELC484680
AFRC 549-680 Elementary Zulu: Accl Audrey N. Mbeje TR 06:00 PM-09:00 PM The Accelerated Elementary Zulu course is intensive, and can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on South Africa, Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, and writing skills at the ceiling of low intermediate level and floor of high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The low intermediate level proficience skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the third semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Intermediate Zulu I course materials. AFRC149680, AFST549680, AFST149680
AFRC 581-640 Learning From Baldwin Kathryn Watterson R 05:30 PM-08:10 PM James Baldwin, one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century, spoke to the issues of his times as well as to our own. This class will examine the intellectual legacy that Baldwin left to present-day writers such as Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Thulani Davis, Caryl Phillips and others. We will spend time reading and discussing Baldwin's novels, short stories, plays and essays. In doing so, we will be considering the complex assumptions and negotiations that we make in our day-to-day lives around our identities and experiences built upon gender, sexual preference, the social-constructs called "race," and more. James Baldwin's life and work will be the touchstone that grounds our discussions. We will read Go Tell It on the Mountain, Another Country, The Fire Next Time, and Giovanni's Room and see films I Am Not Your Negro, The Price of the Ticket and The Murder of Emmett Till. Students will research subjects of their own choosing about Baldwin's life and art. For example, they may focus on the shaping influences of Pentecostalism; segregation; racism; homophobia; exile in Paris; the Civil Rights Movement; Black Power, Baldwin's faith, or his return to America. ENGL581640, GSWS580640
AFRC 587-401 Race, Nation, Empire Deborah A Thomas W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This graduate seminar examines the dynamic relationships among empires, nations and states; colonial and post-colonial policies; and anti-colonial strategies within a changing global context. Using the rubrics of anthropology, history, cultural studies, and social theory, we will explore the intimacies of subject formation within imperial contexts- past and present- especially in relation to ideas about race and belonging. We will focus on how belonging and participation have been defined in particular locales, as well as how these notions have been socialized through a variety of institutional contexts. Finally, we will consider the relationships between popular culture and state formation, examining these as dialectical struggles for hegemony. LALS588401, GSWS587401, ANTH587401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Undergraduates Need Permission</span>
AFRC 602-401 Stereotype Threat, Impostor Phenomenon, and African Americans Ufuoma Abiola M 10:00 AM-12:00 PM This course critically examines stereotype threat and impostor phenomenon as they relate to African Americans. Both stereotype threat and impostor phenomenon negatively affect African Americans. The apprehension experienced by African Americans that they might behave in a manner that confirms an existing negative cultural stereotype is stereotype threat, which usually results in reduced effectiveness in African Americans' performance. Stereotype threat is linked with impostor phenomenon. Impostor phenomenon is an internal experience of intellectual phoniness in authentically talented individuals, in which they doubt their accomplishments and fear being exposed as a fraud. While stereotype threat relies on broad generalization, the impostor phenomenon describes feelings of personal inadequacy, especially in high-achieving African Americans. This course will explore the evolving meanings connected to both stereotype threat and impostor phenomenon in relation to African Americans. EDUC538401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Undergraduates Need Permission</span>
AFRC 638-401 Race & Criminal Justice Marie Gottschalk T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Why are African Americans and some other minority groups disproportionately incarcerated and subjected to penal sanctions? What are the political, social and economic consequences for individuals, communities, and the wider society of mass incarceration in the United States? What types of reforms of the criminal justice system are desirable and possible? This advanced seminar analyzes the connection between race, crime, punishment, and politics in the United States. The primary focus is on the role of race in explaining why the country's prison population increased six-fold since the early 1970s and why the United States today has the highest incarceration rate in the world. The class will likely take field trips to a maximum-security jail in Philadelphia and to a state prison in the Philadelphia suburbs. AFRC437401, PSCI437401, PSCI638401
AFRC 640-301 Proseminar Africana Stds David K. Amponsah W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course focuses on the historical and cultural relationship between Africans and their descendants abroad.
AFRC 770-401 Twenty-First Century African American Literature and Theory Margo N. Crawford W 03:00 PM-06:00 PM How does Elizabeth Alexanders poem Praise Song for the Day, written for the inauguration of Barack Obama, relate to Amiri Barakas 9/11 poem Somebody Blew America? This seminar will explore the unnaming and experimentation that shape African American literature and theory in the early years of the 21st century. frameworks of the seminar will include the post-9/11 novel, the poetics of the black, black abstraction, twenty-first century practices of the black diaspora Age of Obama turn to the satirical. Critical texts such as How to See a Work Total Darkness and Abstractionist Aesthetics will be as central as cutting edgesuch as The Psychic Hold of Slavery and signature essays such as On Failing to the Past Present. This course will focus on the new literary voices that have the 21st century and, also, writers whose 21st century art is the late stage ofliterary trajectory. Special attention will be given to Toni Morrison, Colson Whitehead,Octavia Butler, Claudia Rankine, Mat Johnson, and Paul Beatty. ENGL770401
AFRC 791-401 African Film and Media Pedagogy Dagmawi Woubshet
Karen E Redrobe
R 12:00 PM-03:00 PM This graduate seminar offers an intensive, critical, and collaborative study of contemporary African film and media production. The past three decades have seen an unprecedented shift in the African media landscape. Not only has the wide availability of satellite media across the continent made international film and television programing part of African popular culture, but moreover the growing film industries within the continent, most notably Nollywood, have altered how Africans are carving an image of themselves on the big and small screens. In partnership with local, regional, and international film and media centers, we will study a range of films--features, shorts, documentaries, and television shows--paying close attention to the means and sites of production as well as the formal qualities that distinguish these works. Many of the films we will analyze stand out both for their exceptional aesthetic quality as well as their remarkable ability to confront pressing political and social themes. But we will also think about trash: what counts as trashy media, and for whom? Who watches it, where, and why? Other questions we will ask include: What particular indigenous modes of storytelling do African films employ? What categories begin to emerge under the umbrella category of "African film and media," and where do diasporan film and media practitioners and critics fit in this landscape? How are these films tackling some of the urgent questions of our times, including migration and globalization; ethnic, political, and economic polarization; gender and sexuality; and massive urbanization and industrialization sweeping Africa and other parts of the Global South? What role do festivals in various countries play in shaping media production and distribution? How important is the concept of authorship in this context? And how do these films challenge the dominant western trope of Africa as a spectacle, instead offering novel ways of picturing everyday African experiences that we rarely glimpse in western media? To explore these questions, we will visit multiple sites of film production, distribution, exhibition, and education, including Scribe Video Center in Philadelphia, Sankofa Films in Washington, D.C., and the College of Performing and Visual Art at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. Location and knowledge production are inextricably connected, and by considering African media production from these multiple sites, and collaborating with multiple stakeholders, this course offers a directly engaged pedagogy of the complex artistic, cultural, social, and political dynamics of African audiovisual creation. The travel component of this course entails a day trip to ARTH791401, CIMS791401, COML791401, ENGL777401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Instructor</span>
AFST 140-680 Element Zulu I Residence Audrey N. Mbeje M 07:00 PM-08:30 PM This elementary course is for beginners and it requires no prior knowledge of Zulu. The course will expose students to the Zulu language and culture and will be based in the National Standards for Foreign Language Learning. Students will be engaged in communicative language learning through interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of language learning techniques. They will gain knowledge and understanding of the Zulu culture. They will use their Zulu language and culture learning experience to connect with other disciplines and further their knowledge of these disciplines through perspectives acquired from their Zulu class. They will also develop insight into the nature of language and culture through comparisons of the Zulu language and culture and their own. Through movies, songs, and other cultural activities online students will acquire the natural use of the language which will enable them to acquire linguistic and cultural skill to become life-long learners who can participate in Zulu communities in the U.S. and overseas.
AFST 149-680 Elementary Zulu: Accl Audrey N. Mbeje TR 06:00 PM-09:00 PM The Accelerated Elementary Zulu course is intensive, and can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research onSouth Africa,Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the ceiling of low intermediate level and floor of high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The low intermediate level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the third semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Intermediate Zulu I course materials. AFRC149680, AFST549680, AFRC549680
AFST 151-680 Elementary Zulu II Audrey N. Mbeje MW 03:00 PM-05:00 PM The Elementary Zulu II course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on South Africa, Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the ceiling of low intermediate level and floor of high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The low intermediate level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the third semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Intermediate Zulu I course materials. AFRC152680, AFST551680
AFST 161-680 Elementary Twi II Kobina Ofosu-Donkoh TR 04:30 PM-06:30 PM AFRC163680, AFST565680
AFST 171-680 Elementary Yoruba II Yiwola Awoyale MW 05:00 PM-07:00 PM The main objective of this course is to further sharpen the Yoruba linquistic knowledge that the student acquired in level I. By the end of the course, the student should be able to (1) read, write, and understand simple to moderately complex sentences in Yoruba; and, (2) advance in the knowledge of the Yoruba culture. AFRC171680, AFST518680, AFRC517680
AFST 181-680 Elementary Swahili II Elaine Mshomba TR 12:00 PM-02:00 PM This course continues to introduce basic grammar, vocabulary, and the reading and writing of Swahili to new speakers. During this term, folktales, other texts, and film selections are used to help introduce important aspects of Swahili culture and the use of the language in wide areas of Africa. AFRC181680, AFST581680
AFST 241-680 Elementary Amharic II Yohannes Hailu MW 05:30 PM-07:30 PM Continuation of Elementary Amharic I. Amharic belongs to the southern branch of Hemeto-Semitic languages, which is also referred to as "Afrasian." Amharic is the official language of Ethiopia and is spoken by 14 million native Amharas and by approximately 18 million of the other groups in Ethiopia. This course continues to introduce basic grammar, vocabulary, and the reading and writing of Amharic to new speakers. AFRC241680, AFST541680, AFRC541680, NELC482680
AFST 243-680 Intermediate Amharic II Yohannes Hailu MW 07:30 PM-09:00 PM AFRC243680, AFST544680, AFRC544680, NELC484680
AFST 247-680 Advanced Amharic: Advanced Amharic Part II Yohannes Hailu TR 06:00 PM-08:00 PM An advanced Amharic course that will further sharpen the students' knowledge of the Amharic language and the culture of the Amharas. The learners communicative skills will be further developed through listening, speaking, reading and writing. There will also be discussions on cultural and political issues. AFST547680
AFST 251-680 Intermediate Zulu II Audrey N. Mbeje TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM AFST553680, AFRC251680
AFST 263-680 Intermediate Twi II Kobina Ofosu-Donkoh TR 06:30 PM-08:00 PM AFRC265680
AFST 271-680 Intermediate Yoruba II Yiwola Awoyale TR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM AFST532680, AFRC271680, AFRC534680
AFST 281-680 Intermediate Swahili II Elaine Mshomba TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM At the end of the course students will be at Level 2 on the ILR (Interagency Language Roundtable) scale. AFST583680, AFRC282680
AFST 285-680 Advanced Swahili II Elaine Mshomba TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM The objectives are to continue to strengthen students' knowledge of speaking, listening, reading, and writing Swahili and to compare it with the language of the students; to continue learning about the cultures of East Africa and to continue making comparisons with the culture(s) of the students; to continue to consider the relationship between that knowledge and the knowledge of other disciplines; and using that knowledge, to continue to unite students with communities outside of class. Level 3 on the ILR (Interagency Language Roundtable) scale. AFRC285680, AFST586680
AFST 351-680 Advanced Zulu II Lindiwe Magaya MW 11:30 AM-01:00 PM AFST555680, AFRC351680
AFST 363-680 Advanced Twi II Kobina Ofosu-Donkoh AFST569680, AFRC364680
AFST 371-680 Advanced Yoruba II Yiwola Awoyale TR 07:00 PM-09:00 PM AFST588680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info</span>
AFST 485-680 Swahili Lang/Culture II Elaine Mshomba Continuation of Swahili Language & Culture I. Course is taught in Swahili and focuses on reading/writing skills and speaking/listening skills, as well as structural and cultural information. The course is structured around three thematic units: History, Politics, and Education. AFST591680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span>
AFST 487-680 Yoruba Lang & Culture II Yiwola Awoyale
AFST 491-680 Malagasy-Afr Lg Elem II Travis Aldous TR 07:00 PM-09:00 PM Continuation of AFST 490. Offered through Penn Language Center. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span>
AFST 491-681 Afrc Lang Tutor: Elem II: Igbo-Afr Lang Elem II Chika Nwadiora TR 05:00 PM-07:00 PM Continuation of AFST 490. Offered through Penn Language Center. AFRC491681 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>
AFST 491-682 Afrc Lang Tutor: Elem II: Wolof-Afr Lang Elem II MBAcke Thioune TR 05:00 PM-07:00 PM Continuation of AFST 490. Offered through Penn Language Center. AFRC491682 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>
AFST 491-683 Afrc Lang Tutor: Elem II: Tigrinya - Elem II Ermias Zemichael TR 05:00 PM-07:00 PM Continuation of AFST 490. Offered through Penn Language Center. AFRC491683 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>
AFST 491-684 Malagasy-Afr Lg Elem II Alex Paul Delbar TR 05:00 PM-07:00 PM Continuation of AFST 490. Offered through Penn Language Center. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span>
AFST 491-686 Afrc Lang Tutor: Elem II: Malagasy-Afr Lg Elem II Alex Paul Delbar TR 07:00 PM-09:00 PM Continuation of AFST 490. Offered through Penn Language Center. AFRC491686 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>
AFST 491-688 Chichewa-Afr Lan Elem II Monda Mwaya TR 06:30 PM-08:30 PM Continuation of AFST 490. Offered through Penn Language Center. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>
AFST 493-680 Malagasy - Inter II Travis Aldous MW 05:00 PM-07:00 PM Continuation of AFST 492. Offered through Penn Language Center <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>
AFST 493-681 Afr Lang Tutor: Intrm II: Igbo-Afr Lang Inter II Chika Nwadiora TR 07:30 PM-09:00 PM Continuation of AFST 492. Offered through Penn Language Center AFRC493681 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>
AFST 493-682 Afr Lang Tutor: Intrm II: Wolof-Afr Lang Inter II MBAcke Thioune MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM Continuation of AFST 492. Offered through Penn Language Center AFST597682, AFRC493682 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>
AFST 493-683 Afr Lang Tutor: Intrm II: Tigrinya - Inter II Ermias Zemichael TR 07:30 PM-09:00 PM Continuation of AFST 492. Offered through Penn Language Center AFRC493683 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>
AFST 493-686 Afr Lang Tutor: Intrm II: Malagasy - Inter II Travis Aldous MW 07:00 PM-09:00 PM Continuation of AFST 492. Offered through Penn Language Center AFRC493686 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>
AFST 493-687 Afr Lang Tutor: Intrm II Continuation of AFST 492. Offered through Penn Language Center AFST597687 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>
AFST 509-680 Arabic: Reading Historical Manuscripts Ali B. Ali-Dinar M 03:00 PM-06:00 PM Arabic language is used by many societies not only in communication but also in correspondence and in documenting the affairs of their daily lives. Arabic script is adopted by many groups who native languages are not Arabic, in writing their language before some moved to the roman alphabet. In many historical documents specific style of writing and handwriting are dominant. This specificity is influenced by the dialectical variations, the historical development of each region and the level of Arabic literacy and use.
AFST 518-680 Elementary Yoruba II Yiwola Awoyale MW 05:00 PM-07:00 PM The main objective of this course is to further sharpen the Yoruba linquistic knowledge that the student acquired in level I. By the end of the course, the student should be able to (1) read, write, and understand simple to moderately complex sentences in Yoruba; and (2) advance in the knowledge of the Yoruba culture. AFRC171680, AFRC517680, AFST171680
AFST 532-680 Intermediate Yoruba II Yiwola Awoyale TR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM AFRC271680, AFST271680, AFRC534680
AFST 541-680 Elementary Amharic II Yohannes Hailu MW 05:30 PM-07:30 PM Continuation of Elementary Amharic I. AFRC241680, AFRC541680, AFST241680, NELC482680
AFST 544-680 Intermediate Amharic II Yohannes Hailu MW 07:30 PM-09:00 PM Offered through Penn Language Center AFRC243680, AFRC544680, AFST243680, NELC484680
AFST 547-680 Advanced Amharic: Advanced Amharic Part II Yohannes Hailu TR 06:00 PM-08:00 PM An advanced Amharic course that will further sharpen the students' knowledge of the Amharic language and the culture of the Amharas. The learners communicative skills will be further developed through listening, speaking, reading and wwriting. There will also be discussions on cultural and political issues. AFST247680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span>
AFST 549-680 Elementary Zulu: Accl Audrey N. Mbeje TR 06:00 PM-09:00 PM The Accelerated Elementary Zulu course is intensive, and can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research onSouth Africa,Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the ceiling of low intermediate level and floor of high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The low intermediate level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the third semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Intermediate Zulu I course materials. AFRC149680, AFRC549680, AFST149680
AFST 551-680 Elementary Zulu II Audrey N. Mbeje MW 03:00 PM-05:00 PM The Elementary Zulu II course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on South Africa, Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the ceiling of low intermediate level and floor of high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The low intermediate level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the third semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Intermediate Zulu I course materials. AFRC152680, AFST151680
AFST 553-680 Intermediate Zulu II Audrey N. Mbeje TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM AFRC251680, AFST251680
AFST 555-680 Advanced Zulu II Lindiwe Magaya MW 11:30 AM-01:00 PM AFRC351680, AFST351680
AFST 559-680 Sudanese Arabic II Ali B. Ali-Dinar ARAB549680
AFST 565-680 Elementary Twi II Kobina Ofosu-Donkoh TR 04:30 PM-06:30 PM AFRC163680, AFST161680
AFST 569-680 Advanced Twi II Kobina Ofosu-Donkoh AFRC364680, AFST363680
AFST 581-680 Elementary Swahili II Elaine Mshomba TR 12:00 PM-02:00 PM This course continues to introduce basic grammar, vocabulary, and the reading and writing of Swahili to new speakers. During this term, folktales, other texts, and film selections are used to help introduce important aspects of Swahili culture and the use of the language in wide areas of Africa. AFRC181680, AFST181680
AFST 583-680 Intermediate Swahili II Elaine Mshomba TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM AFRC282680, AFST281680
AFST 586-680 Advanced Swahili II Elaine Mshomba TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM AFRC285680, AFST285680
AFST 588-680 Advanced Yoruba II Yiwola Awoyale TR 07:00 PM-09:00 PM AFST371680
AFST 591-680 Swahili Lang/Culture II Elaine Mshomba Continuation of Swahili Language & Culture I. Course is taught in Swahili and focuses on reading/writing skills and speaking/listening skills, as well as structural and cultural information. The course is structured around three thematic units: History, Politics, and Education. AFST485680
AFST 597-682 Afr Lang Tutor: Intrm II: Wolof-Afr Lang Inter II MBAcke Thioune MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM Continuation of AFST 492. Offered through Penn Language Center. AFRC493682, AFST493682 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span>
AFST 597-687 Afr Lang Tutor: Intrm II Continuation of AFST 492. Offered through Penn Language Center. AFST493687 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span>
AFST 599-680 Amharic-Afr Lang Adv II Ermias Zemichael Continuation of AFST 598.