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Courses for Fall 2019

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
AFRC 001-001 Intro Africana Studies Michael George Hanchard MW 10:30 AM-12:00 PM The term Africana emerged in public discourse amid the social, political, and cultural turbulence of the 1960s. The roots of the field, however, are much older,easily reaching back to oral histories and writings during the early days of the Trans-Atlantic African slave trade. The underpinnings of the field continued to grow in the works of enslaved Africans, abolitionists and social critics of the nineteenth century, and evolved in the twentieth century by black writers, journalists, activists, and educators as the sought to document African descended people's lives. Collectively, their work established African Studies as a discipline,epistemological standpoint and political practice dedicated to understanding the multiple trajectories and experiences of black people in the world throughout history. As an ever-transforming field of study, this course will examine the genealogy, major discourses, and future trajectory of Africana Studies. Using primary sources such as maps and letters, as well as literature and performance, our study of Africana will begin with continental Africa, move across the Atlantic during the middle passage and travel from the coasts of Bahia in the 18th century to the streets of Baltimore in the 21st century. The course is constructed around major themes in Black intellectual thought including: retentions and transferal, diaspora, black power, meanings of blackness, uplift and nationalism. While attending to narratives and theories that concern African descended people in the United States, the course is uniquely designed with a focus on gender and provides context for the African diasporic experience in the Caribbean and Latin America. Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Humanities & Social Science Sector</span>
AFRC 002-401 Intro To Sociology Jerry A Jacobs MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM We live in a country which places a premium on indivi dual accomplishments. Hence, all of you worked extremely hard to get into Penn. Yet, social factors also have an impact on life chance. This class provides an overview of how membership in social groups shapes the outcomes of individuals. We will look at a range of topics from the organizational factors which promoted racial inequality in Ferguson, Mo to the refusal of (mostly elite) parents to vaccinate their children. The experience of women and men in the labor market -- and the social factors that lead women to earn less than men -- is another interesting topic taken up in the course. Who gets ahead in America? Course requirements include a midterm, research paper (five to six pages), final and recitation activities. Students are not expected to have any previous knowledge of the topic. Welcome to the course! SOCI001401 Society sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation and Seminar (see below)</span>
AFRC 003-401 Approaches Literary Std CANCELED This is a topics course. Please see the Comp Lit website for current semester's description: http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/Complit/ COML002401, ENGL002401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFRC 047-401 That's My Song! : Musical Genre As Social Contract Guthrie P. Ramsey R 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Music in American history has been fundamental to identity formation because, as one scholar notes, it comprises "the deepest feelings and qualities that make a group unique. Through moving and sounding together in synchrony, people can experience a feeling of oneness with others." This course examines how various musical genres have served as "social contracts" among audiences throughout the process of this country's nation building process. Within America's melting pot ideal, communities of listeners have asserted their powerful convictions about social identity through musical praxis and its "rules of engagement." The discourses surrounding the notion of "genre" have often made these meanings legible, audible and powerful for many. From Protestant church performance practices, to minstrelsy, to Tin Pan Alley to rock and hip-hop, the social agreements of musical genres help us understand the dynamism of American identities. MUSC047401
AFRC 050-401 World Musics & Cultures Jim Sykes TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. ANTH022401, FOLK022401, MUSC050401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFRC 050-402 World Musics & Cultures MWF 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. ANTH022402, FOLK022402, MUSC050402 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFRC 050-403 World Musics & Cultures MWF 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. ANTH022403, FOLK022403, MUSC050403 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFRC 066-401 African American Drama: From the 1920's To the Present Margo Natalie Crawford TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM This course will introduce students to Pulitzer-prize winning plays such as Lynn Nottage's Sweat, groundbreaking plays such as Ntozake Shange's For Colored Girls, as well as less known plays that show the wide range of form and themes in 20th and 21st century African American drama. We will focus on performance as a mode of interpreting a script and performance as a way of understanding the intersections of race, class, and gender. In-class viewings of selected scenes in recorded productions of the plays will energize our analysis of the scripts. Short creative, performance-oriented writing assignments will produce the questions explored in the two critical essays. In addition to Sweat and For Colored Girls, our line-up may include Zora Neale Hurston s Color Struck, Anna Deavere Smith s Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992, Suzan-Lori Parks' 100 Plays for the First Hundred Days, August Wilson's Radio Golf, Lydia Diamond's Harriet Jacobs, Amiri Baraka's The Slave, and Claudia Rankine's The White Card. ENGL066401, THAR066401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFRC 076-401 Africa Since 1800 Lee V Cassanelli MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Survey of major themes, events, and personalities in African history from the early nineteenth century through the 1960s. Topics include abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism, impact of colonial rule, African resistance, religious and cultural movements, rise of naturalism and pan-Africanism, issues of ethnicity and "tribalism" in modern Africa. HIST076401 History & Tradition Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span>
AFRC 078-401 Urb Univ-Community Rel: Faculty-Student Collaborative Action Seminar in Urban Univ-Comm Relations Ira Harkavy W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM One of the goals of this seminar is to help students develop their capacity to solve strategic, real-world problems by working collaboratively in the classroom, on campus, and in the West Philadelphia community. Research teams help contribute to the improvement of education on campus and in the community, as well as the improvement of university-community relations. Among other responsibilities, students focus their community service on college and career readiness at West Philadelphia High School and Sayre High School. Students are typically engaged in academically based community service learning at the schools for two hours each week. URBS178401, HIST173401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">An Academically Based Community Serv Course</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Benjamin Franklin Seminars</span>
AFRC 112-401 Discrim: Sex Race/Confl: Race and Sex Discrimination Janice Fanning Madden MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM This course is concerned with the structure, the causes and correlates, and the government policies to alleviate discrimination by race and gender in the United States. The central focus of the course is on employment differences by race and gender and the extent to which they arise from labor market discrimination versus other causes, although racial discrimination in housing is also considered. After a comprehensive overview of the structures of labor and housing markets and of nondiscriminatory reasons (that is, the cumulative effects of past discrimination and/or experiences) for the existence of group differentials in employment, wages, and residential locations, various theories of the sources of current discrimination are reviewed and evaluated. Actual governmental policies and alternative policies are evaluated in light of both the empirical evidence on group differences and the alternative theories of discrimination.This course is concerned with the structure, the causes and correlates, and the government policies to alleviate discrimination by race and gender in the United States. The central focus of the course is on employment differences by race and gender and the extent to which they arise from labor market discrimination versus other causes, although racial discrimination in housing. SOCI112401, GSWS114401 Society sector (all classes)
AFRC 115-401 Relig Ethics/Mod Society Anthea D. Butler TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Religious beliefs of Malcolm X and MLK formed their social action during the Civil Rights for African Americans. This seminar will explore the religious biographies of each leader, how religion shaped their public and private personas, and the transformative and transgressive role that religion played in the history of the Civil Rights movement in the United States and abroad. Students in this course will leave with a clearer understanding of religious beliefs of Christianity, The Nation of Islam, and Islam, as well as religiously based social activism. Other course emphases include the public and private roles of religion within the context of the shaping of ideas of freedom, democracy, and equality in the United States, the role of the "Black church" in depicting messages of democracy and freedom, and religious oratory as exemplified through MLK and Malcolm X. See Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. RELS112401
AFRC 120-401 Social Statistics Camille Zubrinsky Charles MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. SOCI120401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span>
AFRC 135-401 Law & Society Hocine Fetni TR 04:30 PM-06:00 PM After introducing students to the major theoretical concepts concerning law and society, significant controversial societal issues that deal with law and the legal systems both domestically and internationally will be examined. Class discussions will focus on issues involving civil liberties, the organization of courts, legislatures, the legal profession and administrative agencies. Although the focus will be on law in the United States, law and society in other countries of Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America will be covered in a comparative context. Readings include research, reports, statutes and cases. SOCI135401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFRC 151-680 Elementary Zulu I Audrey N. Mbeje MW 03:00 PM-05:00 PM The elementary Zulu I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on South Africa, Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Zulu II course materials AFST550680, AFST150680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFRC 162-680 Elementary Twi I Kobina Ofosu-Donkoh TR 04:30 PM-06:30 PM The Elementary Twi I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on Ghana/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Twi. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also a part of the course content. AFST562680, AFST160680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFRC 168-401 Hist of Amer Law To 1877 Sarah L. H. Gronningsater TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM The course surveys the development of law in the U.S. to 1877, including such subjects as: the evolution of the legal profession, the transformation of English law during the American Revolution, the making and implementation of the Constitution, and issues concerning business and economic development, the law of slavery, the status of women, and civil rights. HIST168401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFRC 170-680 Elementary Yoruba I Yiwola Awoyale MW 05:00 PM-07:00 PM This Elementary Yoruba I course can be taken to fulfull a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on Nigeria and the diaspora/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Yoruba. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable commom daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Yoruba II course materials. AFST517680, AFST170680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFRC 176-401 Afro Amer Hist Mia Bay MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM This course examines the experiences of Africans and African Americans in colonial America and in the United States to 1865. We will explore a variety of themes through the use of primary and secondary sources. Topics include: the development of racial slavery, labor, identity, gender, religion, education, law, protest, resistance, and abolition. HIST176401 History & Tradition Sector (all classes)
AFRC 180-680 Elementary Swahili I Elaine Mshomba T 12:00 PM-02:00 PM
R 12:00 PM-02:00 PM
The elementary Swahili course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on East Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative compentence to enable the students to aquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Swahili. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable commom daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high level proficiency skills that the students acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Swahili II course materials. AFST580680, AFST180680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFRC 186-401 Africa and the Transatlantic Slave Trade Roquinaldo A. Ferreira TR 06:30 PM-08:00 PM This course focuses on the history of selected African societies from the sixteenth through the mid-nineteenth centuries. The primary goal is to study the political, economic, social, and cultural history of a number of peoples who participated in the Atlantic slave trade or were touched by it during the era of their involvement. The course is designed to serve as an introduction to the history and culture of African peoples who entered the diaspora during the era of the slave trade. Its audience is students interested in the history of Africa, the African diaspora, and the Atlantic world, as well as those who want to learn about the history of the slave trade. Case studies will include the Yoruba, Akan, and Fon, as well as Senegambian and West-central African peoples. HIST187401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFRC 190-401 Introduction To Africa David K. Amponsah TR 09:00 AM-10:20 AM This course provides an introduction to the study of Africa in all its diversity and complexity. Our focus is cultural, geographical, and historical: we will seek to understand Africa s current place in the world political and economic order and learn about the various social and physical factors that have influenced the historical trajectory of the continent. We study the cultural formations and empires that emerged in Africa before European colonial invasion and then how colonialism reshaped those sociocultural forms. We ll learn about the unique kinds of kinship and religion in precolonial Africa and the changes brought about by the spread of Islam and Christianity. Finally, we ll take a close look at contemporary issues such as ethnic violence, migration, popular culture and poverty, and we'll debate the various approaches to understanding those issues. ANTH190401 Society sector (all classes)
AFRC 215-401 Religion & Colonial Rule in Africa Cheikh Anta MBAcke Babou R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This course is cross listed with HIST 214 (America after 1800: Advanced Benjamin Franklin Seminar) when the subject matter is related to African, African American or African diaspora issues. See the Africana Studies Program's website at www.sas.upenn.edu/africana for a description of the current offerings. HIST216401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Benjamin Franklin Seminars</span>
AFRC 229-402 Civil Rights Movement Mia Bay T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. HIST231402
AFRC 232-401 Race and Ethnic Politics Daniel Q. Gillion TR 10:30 AM-11:30 AM This course examines the role of race and ethnicity in the political discourse through a comparative survey of recent literature on the historical and contemporary political experiences of the four major minority groups (Blacks or African Americans, American Indians, Latinos or Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans). A few of the key topics will include assimilation and acculturation seen in the Asian American community, understanding the political direction of Black America in a pre and post Civil Rights era, and assessing the emergence of Hispanics as the largest minority group and the political impact of this demographic change. Throughout the semester, the course will introduce students to significant minority legislation, political behavior, social movements, litigation/court rulings, media, and various forms of public opinion that have shaped the history of racial and ethnic minority relations in this country. Readings are drawn from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists. PSCI231401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span>
AFRC 234-401 Feminism in the Americas Ann C. Farnsworth-Alvear R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. GSWS233401, LALS233401, HIST233401
AFRC 240-680 Elementary Amharic I Yohannes Hailu MW 05:30 PM-07:30 PM The Elementary Amharic I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on Ethiopia/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Amharic. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable commom daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writting skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Amharic II course materials. AFRC540680, AFST540680, AFST240680, NELC481680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFRC 242-680 Intermediate Amharic I Yohannes Hailu MW 07:30 PM-09:00 PM AFRC543680, AFST543680, AFST242680, NELC483680
AFRC 248-401 Haitian Revolution Yvonne Fabella R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM In August 1791, enslaved Africans on the northern plain of Saint Domingue (colonial Haiti) rose up in a coordinated attack against their French colonial masters and plantation overseers, launching the initial revolt in what would come to be known as the Haitian Revolution. In the years that followed, their actions forced the legal abolition of racial discrimination, and then the abolition of slavery, throughout the French Empire. Ultimately, when Napoleon Bonaparte threatened to return slavery to Saint Domingue, they waged a war for independence. After defeating the Napoleonic army, these former slaves then declared the world's first "Black Republic," the independent state of Haiti, in1804. This seminar will examine some of the major themes and debates surrounding Haiti's colonial and revolutionary history. We will begin by considering the colonial paradox: France's leading role in the intellectual movement called the "Enlightenment" coincided with its ascent as a slaveholding colonial power. The seminar will also explore parallels and pointsof connection between the revolutionary movements in France and Saint Domingue.When the Haitian Revolution began in 1791, the French Revolution was already two years old: how did the increasingly radical ideas and widespread violence in France shape events in the Caribbean? Likewise, how did west African traditions and political ideologies influence insurgents? And how, in turn, did the revolution in Saint Domingue impact the revolution in France? From a diplomatic perspective, we will also consider relations between the Haitian Revolutionary leadership and French officials, examining their respective goals, which overlapped and diverged at different moments. Finally, we will ask how the revolution in Saint Domingue-and and the birth of Haiti--ipacted ideas about liberty, sovereignty and freedom throughout the Atlantic world. We will read a combination of primary and secondary materials each week. Students are encouraged to read primary documents in the original French if they are able. A final research paper will be required of all students, drawing on the Kislak Center's rich collection of revolutionary-era documents. LALS248401, HIST248401
AFRC 253-401 Music and Perf of Africa Carol Ann Muller F 01:00 PM-04:00 PM This class provides an overview of the most popular music styles and discussion of the cultural and political contexts in which they emerged in contemporary Africa. Learning to perform a limited range of African music/dance will be a part of this course. No prior performance experience required. ANTH263401, FOLK253401, MUSC256401
AFRC 264-680 Intermediate Twi I Kobina Ofosu-Donkoh TR 06:30 PM-08:00 PM AFST566680, AFST262680
AFRC 269-401 Classic American Constitutional Law Rogers M Smith MW 03:00 PM-04:00 PM This course explores the creation and transformations of the American constitutional system's structures and goals from the nation's founding through the period of Progressive reforms, the rise of the Jim Crow system, and the Spanish American War. Issues include the division of powers between state and national governments, and the branches of the federal government; economic powers of private actors and government regulators; the authority of governments to enforce or transform racial and gender hierarchies; and the extent of religious and expressive freedoms and rights of persons accused of crimes. We will pay special attention to the changing role of the Supreme Court and its decisions in interpreting and shaping American constitutionalism, and we will also read legislative and executive constitutional arguments, party platforms, and other influential statements of American constitutional thought. PSCI271401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span>
AFRC 270-680 Intermediate Yoruba I Yiwola Awoyale TR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM AFST529680, AFST270680
AFRC 274-401 Faces of Jihad in African Islam Cheikh Anta MBAcke Babou TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course is designed to provide the students with a broad understanding of the history of Islam in Africa. The focus will be mostly on West Africa, but we will also look at developments in other regions of the continent. We will explore Islam not only as religious practice but also as ideology and an instrument of social change. We will examine the process of islamization in Africa and the different uses of Jihad. Topics include prophetic jihad, jihad of the pen and the different varieties of jihad of the sword throughout the history in Islam in sub-Saharan Africa. HIST275401
AFRC 277-401 Penn Slavery Project Res Kathleen M. Brown This research seminar provides students with instruction in basic historical methods and an opportunity to conduct collaborative primary source research into the University of Pennsylvania's historic connections to slavery. After an initial orientation to archival research, students will plunge in to doing actual research at the Kislak Center, the University Archives, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the American Philosophical Society, the Library Company, and various online sources. During the final month of the semester, students will begin drafting research reports and preparing for a public presentation of the work. During the semester, there will be opportunities to collaborate with a certified genealogist, a data management and website expert, a consultant on public programming, and a Penn graduate whose research has been integral to the Penn Slavery Project. HIST273401
AFRC 280-680 Intermediate Swahili I Elaine Mshomba TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
F 03:00 PM-04:00 PM
The objectives of this course are: to strengthen students' knowledge of speaking, listening, reading, and writing Swahili and to compare it with the language of the students; to learn more about the cultures of East Africa and to compare it with the culture(s) of the students; to consider the relationship between that knowledge and the knowledge of other disciplines; and using that knowledge, to unite students with communities outside of class. AFST582680, AFST280680
AFRC 281-401 Twenty-First Century African American Literature Margo Natalie Crawford W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM In this advanced seminar, students will be introduced to a variety of approaches to African American literatures, and to a wide spectrum of methodologies and ideological postures (for example, The Black Arts Movement). The course will present an assortment of emphases, some of them focused on geography (for example, the Harlem Renaissance), others focused on genre (autobiography, poetry or drama), the politics of gender and class, or a particular grouping of authors. Previous versions of this course have included "African American Autobigraphy," "Backgrounds of African American Literature," "The Black Narrative" (beginning with eighteenth century slave narratives and working toward contemporary literature), as well as seminars on urban spaces, jazz, migration, oral narratives, black Christianity, and African-American music. See Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. ENGL281401
AFRC 284-680 Advanced Swahili I Elaine Mshomba TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM
F 04:00 PM-05:00 PM
This is an advanced Kiswahili course which will engage learners in extended spoken and written discourse. Advanced learners of Kiswahili will listen to, read about, write, and speak on authentic video materials, contemporary novels, and newspapers. They will also participate in various discussions on cultural and political issues. AFST584680, AFST284680
AFRC 287-401 African Religious History David K. Amponsah TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM In recent decades, many African countries have perennially ranked very high among the most religious. This course serves as an introduction to major forms of religiosity in sub-Saharan Africa. Emphasis will be devoted to the indigenous religious traditions, Christianity and Islam, as they are practiced on the continent. We will examine how these religious traditions intersect with various aspects of life on the continent. The aim of this class is to help students to better understand various aspects of African cultures by dismantling stereotypes and assumptions that have long characterized the study of religions in Africa. The readings and lectures are will be drawn from historical and a few anthropological, and literary sources. RELS288401, HIST287401
AFRC 294-601 Facing America William D Schmenner W 05:30 PM-08:30 PM This course explores the visual history of race in the United States as both self-fashioning and cultural mythology by examining the ways that conceptions of Native American, Latino, and Asian identity, alongside ideas of Blackness and Whiteness, have combined to create the various cultural ideologies of class, gender, and sexuality that remain evident in historical visual and material culture. We also investigate the ways that these creations have subsequently helped to launch new visual entertainments, including museum spectacles, blackface minstrelsy, and early film, from the colonial period through the 1940s. ARTH274601, LALS274601, CIMS293601, ASAM294601, ARTH674601
AFRC 324-401 Dress & Fashion in Afrca Ali B. Ali-Dinar TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Throughout Africa, social and cultural identities of ethnicity, gender, generation, rank and status were conveyed in a range of personal ornamentation that reflects the variation of African cultures. The meaning of one particular item of clothing can transform completely when moved across time and space. As one of many forms of expressive culture, dress shape and give forms to social bodies. In the study of dress and fashion, we could note two distinct broad approaches, the historical and the anthropological. While the former focuses on fashion as a western system that shifted across time and space, and linked with capitalism and western modernity; the latter approach defines dress as an assemblage of modification the body. The Africanist proponents of this anthropological approach insisted that fashion is not a dress system specific to the west and not tied with the rise of capitalism. This course will focus on studying the history of African dress by discussing the forces that have impacted and influenced it overtime, such as socio-economic, colonialism, religion, aesthetics, politics, globalization, and popular culture. The course will also discuss the significance of the different contexts that impacted the choices of what constitute an appropriate attire for distinct situations. African dress in this context is not a fixed relic from the past, but a live cultural item that is influenced by the surrounding forces. ARTH324401, ANTH342401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2019C&course=AFRC324401
AFRC 325-401 August Wilson and Beyond Suzana E Berger
Herman Beavers
M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM The purpose of this course is to engage students in the rigorous process of mining experiences for material that can be transformed into a public performance piece. In-class writing, group discussions, and field work in the Philadelphia area. AUGUST WILSON AND BEYOND. The people need to know the story. See how they fit into it. See what part they play. - August Wilson, King Hedley II. In this seminar, students will read groundbreaking playwright August Wilson's 20th Century Cycle: ten plays that form an iconic picture of African American traumas, triumphs, and traditions through the decades, told through the lens of Pittsburgh's Hill District neighborhood. Other readings include supporting material on Wilson's work and African American theatre, the works of contemporary playwrights whom Wilson has influenced (such as Suzan-Lori Parks and Tarell Alvin McCraney), and context on Penn's relationship with West Philadelphia. As an Academically Based Community Service (ABCS) course,this seminar gives students the opportunity to enhance their understanding of the plays, and history and culture that shaped them, by forming meaningful relationships with West Philadelphia residents. Wilson's plays provide the bridge between the two groups. The course culminates with students writing an original theatre piece inspired by the readings and relationships, which they will share at an end-of-semester performance. ENGL380401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">An Academically Based Community Serv Course</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Benjamin Franklin Seminars</span>
AFRC 350-680 Advanced Zulu I Audrey N. Mbeje MW 11:00 AM-12:30 PM AFST350680, AFST554680
AFRC 362-680 Advanced Twi I Kobina Ofosu-Donkoh AFST362680, AFST568680
AFRC 387-401 Black Feminist Approaches To History and Memory Grace L. Sanders Johnson M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Topics vary: Black Feminist Approaches to History & Memory - The term black feminism emerged in public discourse amid the social, political, and cultural turbulence of the 1960s. The roots of black feminism, however, are much older, easily reaching back to the work of black women abolitionists and social critics of the nineteenth century. The concept continued to grow and evolve in the work of twentieth century black women writers, journalists, activists, and educators as they sought to document black women's lives. Collectively, their work established black feminism as a political practice dedicated to the equality of all people. More recently, black feminism has been deployed as a tool for theoretical and scholarly analysis that is characterized by an understanding that race, class, gender, and sexuality are inextricably interconnected. Using materials such as slave narratives, social criticism, and archival sources, this course will explore the theoretical and practical applications of black feminist thought in nineteenth and twentieth century North American culture and politics. In particular, we will consider the symbols and practices (storytelling, myth-making, art, archival research) that black women use to document lives. We will ask: how do these methods of documentation inform our understanding of the past and the production of historical knowledge? How can we understand black feminism as both theory and practice? And what are the implications of black feminist approaches for current research and scholarship? We will give particular attention to concepts such as gender, race, memory, the archive, and embodied knowledge to complicate our understanding of historical documentation, epistemology, and authenticity. The course material will include scholarship by Harriet Jacobs, Audre Lorde, Saidiya Hartman, Hazel Carby, Hershini Young, Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, Toni Morrison, and others. (Image: From In Praise of Shadows, Kara Walker (2009). HIST387401, GSWS387401, LALS387401
AFRC 400-401 Blacks in American Film and Television Donald E Bogle M 05:00 PM-08:00 PM This course is an examination and analysis of the changing images and achievements of African Americans in motion pictures and television. The first half of the course focuses on African-American film images from the early years of D.W. Griffith's "renegade bucks" in The Birth of a Nation (1915); to the comic servants played by Steppin Fetchit, Hattie McDaniel, and others during the Depression era; to the post-World War II New Negro heroes and heroines of Pinky (1949) and The Defiant Ones (1958); to the rise of the new movement of African American directors such as Spike Lee (Do the Right Thing), Julie Dash (Daughters of the Dust), Charles Burnett, (To Sleep With Anger) and John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood). The second half explores television images from the early sitcoms "Amos 'n Andy" and "Beulah" to the "Cosby Show," "Fresh Prince of Bel Air," and "Martin." Foremost this course will examine Black stereotypes in American films and television--and the manner in which those stereotypes have reflected national attitudes and outlooks during various historical periods. The in-class screenings and discussions will include such films as Show Boat (1936), the independently produced "race movies" of the 1930s and 1940s, Cabin in the Sky (1943), The Defiant Ones (1958), Imitation of Life (the 1959 remake) & Super Fly (1972). CIMS370401
AFRC 436-401 Love, Anger, Madness: History and Silences in Modern Haiti Grace L. Sanders Johnson W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM On the stage of modern world history, Haiti plays the unique role as both the exceptionally victorious and tragic character. This course interrogates archival documents, oral histories, historical texts, and prose created within the nation and her diaspora in order to establish a nuanced image of the projection of Haiti's modern history. Using two classic Haitian texts, Marie Vieux-Chauvet's Love, Anger, Madness (1968) and Michel-Rolph Trouillot's Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History (1995),this course examines how, why,and to what end Haiti's history and popular narratives about the country have served to construct and dismantle global movements, popular culture, and meanings of race, gender, and citizenship in the Americas. In our historical examination, we will question some of the iconic representations of Haiti through literature that deepen the affective historical profile of Haiti with interrogations of culture, sexuality, political, and media performance. Students will become familiar with the post -colonial history of Haiti and the region, meanings of race, and the production of history. The course is a research and historical methods seminar. Students will conduct archival research and write narratives from primary source material. This course qualifies as a "methods" course for Africana Studies undergraduate majors and minors. HIST436401, GSWS436401, LALS437401
AFRC 509-401 Reading Arabic Manuscrpt Ali B. Ali-Dinar W 03:00 PM-06:00 PM Arabic language is used by many societies not only in communication but also in correspondence and in documenting the affairs of their daily lives. Arabic script is adopted by many groups whose native languages are not Arabic, in writing their languages before some moved to the Roman alphabet. In many historical documents specific style of writing and handwriting are dominant. This specificity is influenced by the dialectical variations, the historical development of each region and the level of Arabic literacy and use. The aims of this course which will focus on the Arabic writing tradition of Africa and the Middle East are as follows: (1) Reading and interpreting hand-written Arabic documents from Africa and the Middle East with focus on different historical eras. (2) In-depth understanding of the historical and language contexts of the selected documents. (3) Examining different handwriting styles that are in vogue in Africa and the Middle East. ARAB580401
AFRC 524-401 Inequality & Race Policy Daniel Q. Gillion T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM PSCI535401
AFRC 540-680 Elementary Amharic I Yohannes Hailu MW 05:30 PM-07:30 PM An introductory course for students with no previous knowledge of Amharic. Amharic belongs to the southern branch of Hemeto-Semitic languages which is also referred to as "Afrasian." Amharic is the official language of Ethiopia and is spoken by 14 million native Amharas and by approximately 19 million of the other ethnic groups in Ethiopia. The goals of this course are to introduce students to the culture, customs, and traditions of the Amharas. Students will develop communicative skills through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. AFST540680, AFRC240680, AFST240680, NELC481680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFRC 543-680 Intermediate Amharic I Yohannes Hailu MW 07:30 PM-09:00 PM Offered through the Penn Language Center AFST543680, AFRC242680, AFST242680, NELC483680
AFRC 547-401 Topics in Religion: Sex Gender Race in Us Anthea D. Butler T 03:00 PM-06:00 PM Religions of the African Diaspora - Religion shapes and defines the lives of many persons in the Africans Diaspora. This course will explore both the historical and present day manifestations of religions practices by those in the African Diaspora, including Voodu, Candomble, Obeah, Rastafari, African Initiated Churches, Pentecostalism, and Catholicism. Theoretical issues including sexuality, gender, and material culture will also be covered in the course. RELS501401
AFRC 548-680 Advanced Amharic: Advanced Amharic Part I Yohannes Hailu TR 07:00 PM-08:30 PM An advanced Amharic course that will further sharpen the students' knowledge of the Amharic language and the culture of the Amharas. The learners communicative skills will be further developed through listening, speaking, reading and wwriting. There will also be discussions on cultural and political issues. AFST547680, AFST247680
AFRC 569-401 Tpcs in 20c Amer. Lit.: James Baldwin Dagmawi Woubshet W 03:00 PM-06:00 PM This course covers topics in 20th-century literature, its emphasis varying with instructor. ENGL569401
AFRC 575-401 Psychoeducational Interactions with Black Males Howard C. Stevenson,
Robert E Carter
R 04:30 PM-06:30 PM This course is designed to introduce students to innovative approaches to the psychology of education, especially with regard to populations from at-risk contexts, sociocultural dimensions of education, and social-emotional learning. EDUC575401
AFRC 605-401 Anthropology of Music Timothy Rommen T 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Topics may include the intellectual history of ethnomusicology, current readings in ethnomusicology, a consideration of theoretical principles based upon the reading and interpretation of selected monographs, and area studies. Please see department website for current course term description. MUSC605401
AFRC 620-401 Exhibiting Black Bodies Tukufu Zuberi R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM
AFRC 640-301 Proseminar in Africana Studies Herman Beavers W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course focuses on the historical and cultural relationship between Africans and their descendants abroad.
AFRC 723-401 Multicultural Issues in Education Vivian L. Gadsden M 04:30 PM-07:00 PM This course examines critical issues, problems, and perspectives in multicultural education. Intended to focus on access to literacy and educational opportunity, the course will engage class members in discussions around a variety of topics in educational practice, research, and policy. Specifically, the course will (1) review theoretical frameworks in multicultural education, (2) analyze the issues of race, racism, and culture in historical and contemporary perspectives, and (3) identify obstacles to participation in the educational process by diverse cultural and ethnic groups. Students will be required to complete field experiences and classroom activities that enable them to reflect on their own belief systems, practices, and educational experiences. EDUC723401
AFRC 771-401 Sem in Afro-Amer Music Guthrie P. Ramsey W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This seminar treats selected aspects of the history, aesthetics, criticism and historiography of African-American music. Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. MUSC770401
AFST 150-680 Elementary Zulu I Audrey N. Mbeje MW 03:00 PM-05:00 PM The elementary Zulu I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on South Africa, Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Zulu II course materials. AFRC151680, AFST550680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFST 160-680 Elementary Twi I Kobina Ofosu-Donkoh TR 04:30 PM-06:30 PM The Elementary Twi I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on Ghana/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Twi. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also a part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Twi II course materials. AFRC162680, AFST562680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFST 170-680 Elementary Yoruba I Yiwola Awoyale MW 05:00 PM-07:00 PM The Elementary Yoruba I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on Nigeria and the diaspora/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Yoruba. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilibilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Yoruba II course materials. AFST517680, AFRC170680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFST 180-680 Elementary Swahili I Elaine Mshomba T 12:00 PM-02:00 PM
R 12:00 PM-02:00 PM
The Elementary Swahili I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on East Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative compentence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Swahili. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Swahili II course materials. AFRC180680, AFST580680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFST 240-680 Elementary Amharic I Yohannes Hailu MW 05:30 PM-07:30 PM The Elementary Amharic I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on Ethiopia/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Amharic. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Amharic II course materials. AFRC540680, AFST540680, AFRC240680, NELC481680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFST 242-680 Intermediate Amharic I Yohannes Hailu MW 07:30 PM-09:00 PM AFRC543680, AFST543680, AFRC242680, NELC483680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
AFST 247-680 Advanced Amharic: Advanced Amharic Part I Yohannes Hailu TR 07:00 PM-08:30 PM An advanced Amharic course that will further sharpen the students' knowledge of the Amharic language and the culture of the Amharas. The learners communicative skills will be further developed through listening, speaking, reading and writing. There will also be discussions on cultural and political issues. AFRC548680, AFST547680
AFST 250-680 Intermediate Zulu I Audrey N. Mbeje TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM AFST552680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
AFST 262-680 Intermediate Twi I Kobina Ofosu-Donkoh TR 06:30 PM-08:00 PM AFST566680, AFRC264680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
AFST 270-680 Intermediate Yoruba I Yiwola Awoyale TR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM AFST529680, AFRC270680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
AFST 280-680 Intermediate Swahili I Elaine Mshomba TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
F 03:00 PM-04:00 PM
The objectives of this course are: to strengthen students' knowledge of speaking, listening, reading, and writing Swahili and to compare it with the language of the students; to learn more about the cultures of East Africa and to compare it with the culture(s) of the students; to consider the relationship between that knowledge and the knowledge of other disciplines; and using that knowledge, to unite students with communities outside of class. AFST582680, AFRC280680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
AFST 284-680 Advanced Swahili I Elaine Mshomba TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM
F 04:00 PM-05:00 PM
This is an advanced Kiswahili course which will engage learners in extended spoken and written discourse. Advanced learners of Kiswahili will listen to, read about, write and speak on authentic video materials, contemporary novels, and newspapers. They will also participate in various discussions on cultural and political issues. AFST584680, AFRC284680
AFST 350-680 Advanced Zulu I Audrey N. Mbeje MW 11:00 AM-12:30 PM AFRC350680, AFST554680
AFST 362-680 Advanced Twi I Kobina Ofosu-Donkoh AFRC362680, AFST568680
AFST 370-680 Advanced Yoruba I Yiwola Awoyale TR 07:30 PM-09:00 PM AFST587680
AFST 460-401 Middle Egyptian David P Silverman TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Introduction to the grammar of Middle Egyptian. ANEL460401
AFST 470-680 Twi Language & Culture I Kobina Ofosu-Donkoh
AFST 484-680 Swahili Lang & Culture I Elaine Mshomba This course taught in Swahili will focus on reading/writing skills and speaking/listening skills as well as structural and cultural information. The course will be structured around three thematic units: History, Politics, and Education. The course will provide background on the Swahili-speaking world: Who were the first Swahili speakers and what varieties of the language did they speak? How did Swahili spread from the coast to other Swahili-speaking areas as far inland as Uganda, Rwanda, and Congo? Swahili is a lingua franca and has importance in the spread of religion and trade movements. Influences of other languages on Swahili and influences of Swahili on local languages will be discussed. Political and educational systems will be discussed as well. AFST590680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>
AFST 486-680 Yoruba Lang & Culture I Yiwola Awoyale TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM
AFST 490-680 Malagasy -Afr Lg Elem I Travis Aldous TR 07:00 PM-09:00 PM The main objective of this course is to allow students to study an African language of their choice, depending on the availability of the instructor. The course will provide students with linquistics tools which will facilitate their research work in the target country. Cultural aspects of the speakers of the language will be introduced and reinforced.
AFST 490-681 Afr Lang Tutorial:Elem I: Igbo-Afr Lang Elem I Chika Nwadiora TR 05:00 PM-07:00 PM The main objective of this course is to allow students to study an African language of their choice, depending on the availability of the instructor. The course will provide students with linquistics tools which will facilitate their research work in the target country. Cultural aspects of the speakers of the language will be introduced and reinforced. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFST 490-682 Wolof-Afr Lang Elem I MBAcke Thioune TR 05:00 PM-07:00 PM The main objective of this course is to allow students to study an African language of their choice, depending on the availability of the instructor. The course will provide students with linquistics tools which will facilitate their research work in the target country. Cultural aspects of the speakers of the language will be introduced and reinforced. AFST594682 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFST 490-683 Afr Lang Tutorial:Elem I: Tigrinya - Elem I Ermias Zemichael TR 05:00 PM-07:00 PM The main objective of this course is to allow students to study an African language of their choice, depending on the availability of the instructor. The course will provide students with linquistics tools which will facilitate their research work in the target country. Cultural aspects of the speakers of the language will be introduced and reinforced. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFST 490-684 Malagasy -Afr Lg Elem I Alex Paul Delbar TR 05:00 PM-07:00 PM The main objective of this course is to allow students to study an African language of their choice, depending on the availability of the instructor. The course will provide students with linquistics tools which will facilitate their research work in the target country. Cultural aspects of the speakers of the language will be introduced and reinforced. AFST594684
AFST 490-685 African Lang Tutorial I The main objective of this course is to allow students to study an African language of their choice, depending on the availability of the instructor. The course will provide students with linquistics tools which will facilitate their research work in the target country. Cultural aspects of the speakers of the language will be introduced and reinforced.
AFST 490-686 Malagasy -Afr Lg Elem I Alex Paul Delbar TR 07:00 PM-09:00 PM The main objective of this course is to allow students to study an African language of their choice, depending on the availability of the instructor. The course will provide students with linquistics tools which will facilitate their research work in the target country. Cultural aspects of the speakers of the language will be introduced and reinforced.
AFST 490-687 African Lang Tutorial I CANCELED The main objective of this course is to allow students to study an African language of their choice, depending on the availability of the instructor. The course will provide students with linquistics tools which will facilitate their research work in the target country. Cultural aspects of the speakers of the language will be introduced and reinforced. AFST594687
AFST 490-688 Chichewa-Afr Lang Elem I Monda Mwaya TR 06:30 PM-08:30 PM The main objective of this course is to allow students to study an African language of their choice, depending on the availability of the instructor. The course will provide students with linquistics tools which will facilitate their research work in the target country. Cultural aspects of the speakers of the language will be introduced and reinforced.
AFST 492-680 Malagasy - Afr Lg Int I Travis Aldous MW 05:00 PM-07:00 PM Intermediate level courses in a variety of African languages: Igbo, Shona, Wolof, Malagasy, Chichewa, Setswana, Manding, Afrikaans, Setswana. Focus on oral proficiency and productive language skills. All course are langauge specfic and follow ACTFL proficiency guidelines. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
AFST 492-681 Afr Lang Tutor: Interm I: Igbo-Afr Lang Inter I Chika Nwadiora TR 07:00 PM-08:30 PM Intermediate level courses in a variety of African languages: Igbo, Shona, Wolof, Malagasy, Chichewa, Setswana, Manding, Afrikaans, Setswana. Focus on oral proficiency and productive language skills. All course are langauge specfic and follow ACTFL proficiency guidelines. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
AFST 492-682 Wolof - Afr Lang Inter I MBAcke Thioune MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM Intermediate level courses in a variety of African languages: Igbo, Shona, Wolof, Malagasy, Chichewa, Setswana, Manding, Afrikaans, Setswana. Focus on oral proficiency and productive language skills. All course are langauge specfic and follow ACTFL proficiency guidelines. AFST596682 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
AFST 492-683 Tigrinya - Interm I Ermias Zemichael TR 07:30 PM-09:00 PM Intermediate level courses in a variety of African languages: Igbo, Shona, Wolof, Malagasy, Chichewa, Setswana, Manding, Afrikaans, Setswana. Focus on oral proficiency and productive language skills. All course are langauge specfic and follow ACTFL proficiency guidelines. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>
AFST 492-686 Malagasy - Afr Lg Int I Travis Aldous MW 07:00 PM-09:00 PM Intermediate level courses in a variety of African languages: Igbo, Shona, Wolof, Malagasy, Chichewa, Setswana, Manding, Afrikaans, Setswana. Focus on oral proficiency and productive language skills. All course are langauge specfic and follow ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
AFST 492-687 Afst Tutorial Intermediate level courses in a variety of African languages: Igbo, Shona, Wolof, Malagasy, Chichewa, Setswana, Manding, Afrikaans, Setswana. Focus on oral proficiency and productive language skills. All course are langauge specfic and follow ACTFL proficiency guidelines. AFST596687
AFST 494-680 Malagasy - Adv I Travis Aldous TR 05:30 PM-07:00 PM Language specific sections for students interested in doing country-specific research in a target language. Courses cover project-based skills for AFST research. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>
AFST 494-683 Tigrinya-Afr Lang Adv I Ermias Zemichael TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Language specific sections for students interested in doing country-specific research in a target language. Courses cover project-based skills for AFST research. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>
AFST 494-684 Malagasy - Adv I Language specific sections for students interested in doing country-specific research in a target language. Courses cover project-based skills for AFST research.
AFST 494-686 Afrikaans-Afr Lang Adv I Language specific sections for students interested in doing country-specific research in a target language. Courses cover project-based skills for AFST research. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>
AFST 494-687 Maninka-Afr Lang Adv I Language specific sections for students interested in doing country-specific research in a target language. Courses cover project-based skills for AFST research. AFST598687 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span>
AFST 517-680 Elementary Yoruba I Yiwola Awoyale MW 05:00 PM-07:00 PM This is an introductory course in Yoruba whose goals are to introduce students to the history, geographical location of the people who speak Yoruba, their culture, customs, and traditions; and, to enable students to develop communicative skills through listening, speaking, reading and writing. AFRC170680, AFST170680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFST 529-680 Intermediate Yoruba I Yiwola Awoyale TR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM AFRC270680, AFST270680
AFST 540-680 Elementary Amharic I Yohannes Hailu MW 05:30 PM-07:30 PM An introductory course for students with no previous knowledge of Amharic. Amharic belongs to the southern branch of Hemeto-Semitic languages which is also referred to as "Afrasian." Amharic is the official language of Ethiopia and is spoken by 14 million native Amharas and by approximately 18 million of the other ethic groups in Ethiopia. The goals of this course are to introduce students to the culture, customs, and traditions of the Amharas. Students will develop communicative skills through listening, speaking, reading and writing. AFRC540680, AFRC240680, AFST240680, NELC481680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFST 543-680 Intermediate Amharic I Yohannes Hailu MW 07:30 PM-09:00 PM Offered through Penn Language Center AFRC543680, AFRC242680, AFST242680, NELC483680
AFST 547-680 Advanced Amharic: Advanced Amharic Part I Yohannes Hailu TR 07:00 PM-08:30 PM An advanced Amharic course that will further sharpen the students' knowledge of the Amharic language and the culture of the Amharas. The learners communicative skills will be further developed through listening, speaking, reading and wwriting. There will also be discussions on cultural and political issues. AFRC548680, AFST247680
AFST 548-680 Sudanese Arabic I Ali B. Ali-Dinar Sudan is a country with a rich history and diverse cultures and people. Sudan is surrounded by nine countries. Two of Sudan's neighbors have Arabic as their official language (Egypt & Libya). While in neighboring Chad and Eritrea, Arabic is widely spoken. The only barrier that divides Sudan from Arabia is the Red Sea. Arabic is the official language of the Sudan, and Sudanese pidgin Arabic (Juba Arabic) is widely used in the southern part of the country. Sudanese colloquial Arabic has close resemblance to Egyptian Colloquial Arabic and to Classical Arabic. Sudanese colloquial Arabic is also spoken and is intelligible in Eritrea, Chad, Nigeria and many places in West Africa. This course will focus on speaking, listening, reading, & writing Sudanese Arabic through the followings: 1- Speaking: Conversing in Sudanese Arabic in various settings. 2- Reading & Writing: Reading and writing of Sudanese Arabic Texts. 3- Listening: Listening to various audio recordings of Sudanese Arabic in different forms and settings. ARAB548680
AFST 550-680 Elementary Zulu I Audrey N. Mbeje MW 03:00 PM-05:00 PM The elementary Zulu I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on South Africa, Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills a the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice levelproficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Zulu II course materials. AFRC151680, AFST150680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFST 552-680 Intermediate Zulu I Audrey N. Mbeje TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM AFST250680
AFST 554-680 Advanced Zulu I Audrey N. Mbeje MW 11:00 AM-12:30 PM AFRC350680, AFST350680
AFST 562-680 Elementary Twi I Kobina Ofosu-Donkoh TR 04:30 PM-06:30 PM The Elementary Twi I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on Ghana/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Twi. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also a part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Twi II course materials. AFRC162680, AFST160680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFST 566-680 Intermediate Twi I Kobina Ofosu-Donkoh TR 06:30 PM-08:00 PM AFRC264680, AFST262680
AFST 568-680 Advanced Twi I Kobina Ofosu-Donkoh AFRC362680, AFST362680
AFST 580-680 Elementary Swahili I Elaine Mshomba T 12:00 PM-02:00 PM
R 12:00 PM-02:00 PM
Beginning level of Swahili which provides training and practice in speaking, reading and writing with initial emphasis on speaking and listening. Basic grammar, vocabulary and cultural skills learned gradually with priority on the spoken language. Especially during the second term, folktales, other texts and films will be used to help introduce important aspects of Swahili culture. AFRC180680, AFST180680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
AFST 582-680 Intermediate Swahili I Elaine Mshomba TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
F 03:00 PM-04:00 PM
AFRC280680, AFST280680
AFST 584-680 Advanced Swahili I Elaine Mshomba TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM
F 04:00 PM-05:00 PM
This is an advanced Kiswahili course which will engage learners in extended spoken and written discourse. Advanced learners of Kiswahili will listen to, read about, write and speak on authentic video materials, contemporary novels, and newspapers. They will also participate in various discussions on cultural and political issues. AFRC284680, AFST284680
AFST 587-680 Advanced Yoruba I Yiwola Awoyale TR 07:30 PM-09:00 PM AFST370680
AFST 590-680 Swahili Lang & Culture I Elaine Mshomba This course taught in Swahili will focus on reading/writing skills and speaking/listening skills as well as structural and cultural information. The course will be structured around three thematic units: History, Politics, and Education. The course will provide background on the Swahili-speaking world: Who were the first Swahili speakers and what varieties of the language did they speak? How did Swahili spread from the coast to other Swahili-speaking areas as far inland as Uganda, Rwanda, and Congo? Swahili is a lingua franca and has importance in the spread of religion and trade movements. Influences of other languages on Swahili and influences of Swahili on local languages will be discussed. Political and educational systems will be discussed as well. AFST484680 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span>
AFST 594-682 Wolof-Afr Lang Elem I MBAcke Thioune TR 05:00 PM-07:00 PM AFST490682 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span>
AFST 594-684 Malagasy -Afr Lg Elem I Alex Paul Delbar TR 05:00 PM-07:00 PM AFST490684 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span>
AFST 594-687 Maninka - Afr Lg Elem I CANCELED AFST490687 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span>
AFST 596-682 Wolof - Afr Lang Inter I MBAcke Thioune MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM Intermediate level courses in a variety of African languages: Igbo, Shona, WoloWololof, Malagasy, Chichewa, Setswana, Manding, Afrikaans, Setswana. on oral proficiency and productive language skills. All course are langauge specfic and follow ACTFL proficiency guidelines. AFST492682 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span>
AFST 596-687 Afst Tutorial Intermediate level courses in a variety of African languages: Igbo, Shona, WoloWololof, Malagasy, Chichewa, Setswana, Manding, Afrikaans, Setswana. on oral proficiency and productive language skills. All course are langauge specfic and follow ACTFL proficiency guidelines. AFST492687 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span>
AFST 598-687 Maninka-Afr Lang Adv I Language specific sections for students interested in doing country-specific research in a target language. Courses cover project-based skills for AFST research. AFST494687 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span>
AFST 599-007 Afr Lang Tutor: Adv II Continuation of AFST 598.