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Courses for Fall 2017

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
AFRC 001-001 INTRO AFRICANA STUDIES JOHNSON, GRACE
ROLLINS, OLIVER
CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 402 TR 0130PM-0300PM The aim of this course is to provide an interdisciplinary examination of the complex array of African American and other African Diaspora social practices and experiences. This class will focus on both classic texts and modern works that provide an introduction to the dynamics of African American and African Diaspora thought and practice. Topics include: What is Africana Studies?; The History Before 1492; Creating the African Diaspora After 1500; The Challenge of Freedom; Race, Gender and Class in the 20th Century; From Black Studies to Africana Studies: The Future of Africana Studies.
    Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
    AFRC 006-401 RACE & ETHNIC RELATIONS ZUBERI, TUKUFU MCNEIL BUILDING 103 TR 1200PM-0130PM The course will focus on race and ethnicity in the United States. We begin with a brief history of racial categorization and immigration to the U.S. The course continues by examining a number of topics including racial and ethnic identity, interracial and interethnic friendships and marriage, racial attitudes, mass media images, residential segregation, educational stratification, and labor market outcomes. The course will include discussions of African Americans, Whites, Hispanics, and Asian Americans and Multiracials.
      CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
      AFRC 010-401 RACE CRIME & PUNISHMENT GOTTSCHALK, MARIE STITELER HALL B30 T 0130PM-0430PM This course is cross-listed with PSCI 010 (Freshmen Seminar) when the subject matter is related to African American or other African Diaspora issues. Topics vary. A recent topic is "Race, Crime, and Punishment." See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.
        CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
        AFRC 041-401 HOMELESSNESS & URBAN INEQUALITY CULHANE, DENNIS MCNEIL BUILDING 167-8 F 0200PM-0500PM This freshman seminar examines the homelessness problem from a variety of scientific and policy perspectives. Contemporary homelessness differs significantly from related conditions of destitute poverty during other eras of our nation's history. Advocates, researchers and policymakers have all played key roles in defining the current problem, measuring its prevalence, and designing interventions to reduce it. The first section of this course examines the definitional and measurement issues, and how they affect our understanding of the scale and composition of the problem. Explanations for homelessness have also been varied, and the second part of the course focuses on examining the merits of some of those explanations, and in particular, the role of the affordable housing crisis. The third section of the course focuses on the dynamics of homelessness, combining evidence from ethnographic studies of how people become homeless and experience homelessness, with quantitative research on the patterns of entry and exit from the condition. The final section of the course turns to the approaches taken by policymakers and advocates to address the problem, and considers the efficacy and quandaries associated with various policy strategies. The course concludes by contemplating the future of homelessness research and public policy.
          CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
          AFRC 050-401 WORLD MUSICS & CULTURES ROMMEN, TIMOTHY FISHER-BENNETT HALL 419 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process.
            Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
            AFRC 050-402 WORLD MUSICS & CULTURES ZHANG, SHELLEY LERNER CENTER (MUSIC BUILDING 101 MWF 1000AM-1100AM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process.
              Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
              AFRC 053-401 MUSIC OF AFRICA MULLER, CAROL CANCELED African Contemporary Music: North, South, East, and West. Come to know contemporary Africa through the sounds of its music: from South African kwela, jazz, marabi, and kwaito to Zimbabwean chimurenga; Central African soukous and pygmy pop; West African Fuji, and North African rai and hophop. Through reading and listening to live performance, audio and video recordings, we will examine the music of Africa and its intersections with politics, history, gender, and religion in the colonial and post colonial era. (Formerly Music 053).
                CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ONLINE COURSE FEE $150; ONLINE COURSE ONLY; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                AFRC 070-401 COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB A5 TR 0900AM-1030AM This course provides an introduction to the broad literature on Latin America s rich colonial history. We will begin by tracing some of the early origins of - and points of contact between - the Indian, Iberian, and African men and women who formed the basis of colonial society. As the course progresses, we will explore the variety of ways in which colonial subjects lived, worked, ate, worshipped and socialized. Lectures and reading assignments will draw upon a variety of sources, including court cases, artistic renderings, city maps and street plans, travel accounts of visits to the region, and the material, cultural, and intellectual products made possible by the wealth and dynamism of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Age of Revolutions, a period of dramatic upheaval that remains at the center of lively scholarly debates. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage the key questions driving these debates, the most important of which, perhaps, is: what is Latin America s colonial legacy?
                  History & Tradition Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                  AFRC 076-401 AFRICA SINCE 1800 CASSANELLI, LEE COLLEGE HALL 200 MW 1200PM-0100PM Survey of major themes, events, and personalities in African history from the early nineteenth century through the 1960s. Topics include abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism, impact of colonial rule, African resistance, religious and cultural movements, rise of naturalism and pan-Africanism, issues of ethnicity, and "tribalisms" in modern Africa.
                    History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                    AFRC 077-401 JAZZ:STYLE & HISTORY CANCELED This course is an exploration of the family of musical idioms called jazz. Attention will be given to issues of style development, selective musicians, and to the social and cultural conditions and the scholarly discourses that have informed the creation, dissemination and reception of this dynamic set of styles from the beginning of the 20th century to the present.
                      CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                      AFRC 078-401 URB UNIV-COMMUNITY REL: Faculty-Student Collaborative Action Seminar in Urban Univ-Comm Relations HARKAVY, IRA NETTER CENTER CONF W 0200PM-0500PM A primary goal of the seminar is to help students develop proposals as to how a Penn undergraduate education might better empower students to produce, not simply "consume," societally-useful knowledge, as well as function as caring, contributing citizens of a democratic society. Please note new location of the class: The Netter Conference Room is on 111 South 38th Street, on the 2nd floor. Among other responsibilities, students focus their community service on college and career readiness at West Philadelphia High School and Sayre High School. Students are typically engaged in academically based community service learning at the schools for two hours each week.
                        CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                        AFRC 081-401 INTRO TO AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE CRAWFORD, MARGO FISHER-BENNETT HALL 401 MW 0330PM-0500PM This introduction to African American literature will begin with contemporary, groundbreaking texts such as Claudia Rankines Citizen: An American Lyric and Toni Morrisons A Mercy. These twenty-first century texts will lead us to the questions about freedom, beauty, struggle, pleasure, and resistance that shape the origins of African American literature. The course will be shaped around circles of influence (not a linear mapping of a literary tradition). These circles of the changing same become the art of flow, layering, and rupture. We will dive into the multidirectional flow of slave narratives/neo-slave narratives,black modernism/black postmodernism,black respectability politics/ black radicalism, and mastery of form/deformation of mastery. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.
                          CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                          AFRC 112-401 DISCRIMINATION This course is concerned with the structure, the causes and correlates, and the government policies to alleviate discrimination by race and gender in the United States. The central focus of the course is on employment differences by race and gender and the extent to which they arise from labor market discrimination versus other causes, although racial discrimination in housing is also considered. After a comprehensive overview of the structures of labor and housing markets and of nondiscriminatory reasons (that is, the cumulative effects of past discrimination and/or experiences) for the existence of group differentials in employment, wages and residential locations, various theories of the sources of current discrimination are reviewed and evaluated. Actual government policies and alternatives policies are evaluated in light of both the empirical evidence on group differences and the alternative theories of discrimination.
                            Society sector (all classes) CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; SOCIETY SECTOR; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                            AFRC 120-401 SOCIAL STATISTICS CHARLES, CAMILLE STITELER HALL B21 MW 1000AM-1100AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests.
                              SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
                              AFRC 134-402 CREAT.NON-FICTION WRIT: NONFICTION NOW! CARY, LORENE 3401 WALNUT STREET 330A R 0130PM-0430PM This class is designed to advance students' writing practice, discipline, and workshop and critiquing skills. Student writers will create non-fiction narrative in several forms: blogs, memoir, interviews, Q&As, essays. We will play with promotion, video, and social marketing, even grant proposals, advertisements, public service announcements, queries, and photo captions -all the forms that writers actually use throughout careers of deep reflection followed by hustle-and-pitch. The class will act as an editorial group for SafeKidsStories.org, a site to be launched in the fall of 2015. The idea is to depict safety with the specificity and drama that we usually reserve for conflict. Your writing will explore Big Questions about the social, emotional, relational and physical structures that affect our children and youth ; your research, interviews, reporting, and experience will discover and share solutions. If we do the job right, we will shine a light on people inour midst creating structures of safety for kids in an era of fear. If we make it fun to read, look at, and listen to, too, then, like a few historic college courses that participate substantively in their communities, we'll be on our way to stealth culture change.
                                AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE
                                AFRC 135-401 LAW & SOCIETY FETNI, HOCINE MCNEIL BUILDING 286-7 TR 0430PM-0600PM After introducing students to the major theoretical concepts concerning law and society, significant controversial societal issues that deal with law and the legal systems both domestically and internationally will be examined. Class discussions will focus on issues involving civil liberties, the organization of courts, legislatures, the legal profession and administrative agencies. Although the focus will be on law in the United States, law and society in other countries of Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America will be covered in a comparative context. Readings include research, reports, statutes and cases.
                                  CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                  AFRC 151-680 ELEMENTARY ZULU I MBEJE, AUDREY WILLIAMS HALL 302 MW 0300PM-0500PM The elementary Zulu I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on South Africa, Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content.
                                    LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                    AFRC 162-680 ELEMENTARY TWI I OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA WILLIAMS HALL 301 TR 0430PM-0630PM The Elementary Twi I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on Ghana/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Twi. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also a part of the course content.
                                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                      AFRC 168-401 HIST OF AMER LAW TO 1877 BERRY, MARY COLLEGE HALL 314 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course surveys the development of law in the U.S. to 1877, including such subjects as: the evolution of the legal profession, the transformation of English law during the American Revolution, the making and implementation of the Constitution, and issues concerning business and economic development, the law of slavery, the status of women, and civil rights.
                                        CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                        AFRC 170-680 ELEMENTARY YORUBA I AWOYALE, YIWOLA FISHER-BENNETT HALL 140 MW 0500PM-0700PM This Elementary Yoruba I course can be taken to fulfull a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on Nigeria and the diaspora/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Yoruba. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable commom daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Yoruba II course materials.
                                          LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                          AFRC 172-401 THE AMERICAN SOUTH GIESBERG, JUDITH LAB-STRUC OF MATTER AUD MW 1000AM-1100AM This course will cover southern culture and history from 1607-1860, from Jamestown to secession. It traces the rise of slavery and plantation society, the growth of Southern sectionalism and its explosion into Civil War.
                                            History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                            AFRC 180-680 ELEMENTARY SWAHILI I MSHOMBA, ELAINE WILLIAMS HALL 217 TR 1200PM-0200PM The elementary Swahili course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on East Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative compentence to enable the students to aquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Swahili. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable commom daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high level proficiency skills that the students acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Swahili II course materials.
                                              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                              AFRC 190-401 INTRODUCTION TO AFRICA HASTY, MARY COLLEGE HALL 314 TR 0900AM-1030AM This course provides an introduction to the study of Africa in all its diversity and complexity. Our focus is cultural, geographical, and historical: we will seek to understand Africa s current place in the world political and economic order and learn about the various social and physical factors that have influenced the historical trajectory of the continent. We study the cultural formations and empires that emerged in Africa before European colonial invasion and then how colonialism reshaped those sociocultural forms. We ll learn about the unique kinds of kinship and religion in precolonial Africa and the changes brought about by the spread of Islam and Christianity. Finally, we ll take a close look at contemporary issues such as ethnic violence, migration, popular culture and poverty, and we'll debate the various approaches to understanding those issues.
                                                Society sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SOCIETY SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
                                                AFRC 209-401 AFRICAN ART CANCELED This selective survey will examine a variety of the circumstances of sub-Saharan African art, ranging from imperial to nomadic cultures and from ancient times to comtemporary participation in the international market. Iconography, themes and style will be considered, as will questions of modernity, religious impact, tradition and colonialism.
                                                  AFRC 215-401 RELIGION & COLONIAL RULE IN AFRICA BABOU, CHEIKH COLLEGE HALL 217 R 0130PM-0430PM This course is cross listed with HIST 214 (America after 1800: Advanced Benjamin Franklin Seminar) when the subject matter is related to African, African American or African diaspora issues. See the Africana Studies Program's website at www.sas.upenn.edu/africana for a description of the current offerings.
                                                    BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                    AFRC 223-601 STORYTELLING IN AFRICA BLAKELY, PAMELA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 T 0430PM-0730PM
                                                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                      AFRC 229-401 TOPICS IN US HISTORY LANCTOT, NEIL COLLEGE HALL 315A W 0330PM-0630PM Topics Vary. See the Africana Studies Department's course list at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offering.
                                                        AFRC 234-402 UNOFFICIAL HISTORIES OF THE COLONIAL CARIBBEAN FABELLA, YVONNE VAN PELT LIBRARY 302 W 0200PM-0500PM Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.
                                                          AFRC 235-601 LAW AND SOCIAL CHANGE FETNI, HOCINE MCNEIL BUILDING 167-8 T 0630PM-0930PM Beginning with discussion of various perspectives on social change and law, this course then examines in detail the interdependent relationship between changes in legal and societal institutions. Emphasis will be placed on (1) how and when law can be an instrument for social change, and (2) how and when social change can cause legal change. In the assessment of this relationship, emphasis will be on the laws of the United States. However, laws of other countries and international law relevant to civil liberties, economic, social and political progress will be studied. Throughout the course, discussions will include legal controversies relevant to social change such as issues of race, gender and the law. Other issues relevant to State-Building and development will be discussed. A comparative framework will be used in the analysis of this interdependent relationship between law and social change.
                                                            AFRC 240-680 ELEMENTARY AMHARIC I HAILU, YOHANNES WILLIAMS HALL 6 MW 0530PM-0730PM The Elementary Amharic I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on Ethiopia/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Amharic. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable commom daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writting skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Amharic II course materials.
                                                              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                              AFRC 242-680 INTERMEDIATE AMHARIC I HAILU, YOHANNES WILLIAMS HALL 6 MW 0730PM-0900PM
                                                                LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                AFRC 247-680 ADVANCED AMHARIC WILLIAMS HALL 318 TR 0700PM-0830PM An advanced Amharic course that will further sharpen the student's knowledge of the Amharic language and the culture of the Amharas. The learner's communicative skills will be further developed through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. There will also be discussions on cultural and political issues.
                                                                  CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                  AFRC 249-401 RACE AND THE MEDIA ZUBERI, TUKUFU WILLIAMS HALL 316 TR 0300PM-0430PM This course considers the theory and practice of miniority representation in the public domain: film, theater, television, music, advertising and museums. How has "minority" been defined - who is included and why? How have notions of "minority" status been constructed in our public languages and what may be the impact of those images on both minority and non-minority populations? Our focus will be on representation and how it may work to marginalize or empower members of minority populations. While we will concentrate primarily on ethnic minorities, we will also consider how these same issues might affect sexual minorities. Our discussions will be supplemented by film and video examples. While the course will be theoretically situated in communication, it will consider how the perspectives of anthropology, feminism, and literary and ethnic studies have affected our understanding of public representations.
                                                                    AFRC 264-680 INTERMEDIATE TWI I OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA WILLIAMS HALL 301 TR 0630PM-0800PM
                                                                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                      AFRC 268-401 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN AFRICAN SOCIETY IMOAGENE, ONOSO CLAIRE M. FAGIN HALL (NURSING 219 T 0130PM-0430PM This course will deal with law and society in Africa. After surveying the various legal systems in Africa, the focus will be on how and to what extent the countries of Africa "re-Africanized" their legal systems by reconciling their indigenous law with western law and other legal traditions to create unified legal systems that are used as instruments of social change and development. Toward this end, the experiences of various African countries covering the various legal traditions will be included. Specific focus will be on laws covering both economic and social relations. This emphasis includes laws of contracts and civil wrongs, land law, law of succession, marriage and divorce and Africa's laws of International Relations, among other laws. Throughout this course a comparative analysis with non-African countries will be stressed.
                                                                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                        AFRC 269-401 CLASSIC AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL LAW SMITH, ROGERS STITELER HALL B26 MW 0300PM-0400PM This course explores the creation and transformations of the American constitutional system's structures and goals from the nation's founding through the period of Progressive reforms, the rise of the Jim Crow system, and the Spanish American War. Issues include the division of powers between state and national governments, and the branches of the federal government; economic powers of private actors and government regulators; the authority of governments to enforce or transform racial and gender hierarchies; and the extent of religious and expressive freedoms and rights of persons accused of crimes. We will pay special attention to the changing role of the Supreme Court and its decisions in interpreting and shaping American constitutionalism, and we will also read legislative and executive constitutional arguments, party platforms, and other influential statements of American constitutional thought.
                                                                          SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                          AFRC 270-680 INTERMEDIATE YORUBA I AWOYALE, YIWOLA WILLIAMS HALL 302 TR 0500PM-0630PM
                                                                            LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                            AFRC 274-401 FACES OF ISLAM IN AFRICA BABOU, CHEIKH COLLEGE HALL 311F TR 1030AM-1200PM This course is designed to provide the students with a broad understanding of the history of Islam in Africa. The focus will be mostly on West Africa, but we will also look at developments in other regions of the continent. We will examine the process of islamization in Africa and the interplay between Islam and the African traditional religions and customs. Topics include conversion, Islamic education and literacy, the status of women, Muslim response to European colonial domination, Islamic mysticism and the contemporary development of Sunni movements.
                                                                              CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                              AFRC 276-401 AFRICAN AMERICAN LIFE AND CULTURE IN SLAVERY WILLIAMS, HEATHER WILLIAMS HALL 705 MW 0200PM-0330PM This course will examine the lives of enslaved African Americans in the United States, both in the North and the South. We will engage historiographical debates, and tackle questions that have long concerned historians. For example, if slaves were wrenched from families and traded, could they sustain family relationships? If slaves worked from sun-up until sun-down, how could they create music? We will engage with primary and secondary sources to expand our understandings of values, cultural practices, and daily life among enslaved people. Topics will include: literacy, family, labor, food, music and dance, hair and clothing, religion, material culture, resistance, and memories of slavery. Several disciplines including History, Archaeology, Literature, and Music, will help us in our explorations. Written, oral, and artistic texts for the course will provide us with rich sources for exploring the nuances of slave life, and students will have opportunities to delve deeply into topics that are of particular interest to them.
                                                                                AFRC 280-680 INTERMEDIATE SWAHILI I MSHOMBA, ELAINE WILLIAMS HALL 217
                                                                                WILLIAMS HALL 217
                                                                                TR 1030AM-1200PM
                                                                                F 0300PM-0400PM
                                                                                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                  AFRC 284-680 ADVANCED SWAHILI I MSHOMBA, ELAINE WILLIAMS HALL 217
                                                                                  WILLIAMS HALL 217
                                                                                  TR 0900AM-1030AM
                                                                                  F 0400PM-0500PM
                                                                                  This is an advanced Kiswahili course which will engage learners in extended spoken and written discourse. Advanced learners of Kiswahili will listen to, read about, write, and speak on authentic video materials, contemporary novels, and newspapers. They will also participate in various discussions on cultural and political issues.
                                                                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                    AFRC 324-401 DRESS & FASHION IN AFRCA ALI-DINAR, ALI WILLIAMS HALL 23 TR 0300PM-0420PM Throughout Africa, social and cultural identities of ethnicity, gender, generation, rank and status were conveyed in a range of personal ornamentation that reflects the variation of African cultures. The meaning of one particular item of clothing can transform completely when moved across time and space. As one of many forms of expressive culture, dress shape and give forms to social bodies. In the study of dress and fashion, we could note two distinct broad approaches, the historical and the anthropological. While the former focuses on fashion as a western system that shifted across time and space, and linked with capitalism and western modernity; the latter approach defines dress as an assemblage of modification the body. The Africanist proponents of this anthropological approach insisted that fashion is not a dress system specific to the west and not tied with the rise of capitalism. This course will focus on studying the history of African dress by discussing the forces that have impacted and influenced it overtime, such as socio-economic, colonialism, religion, aesthetics, politics, globalization, and popular culture. The course will also discuss the significance of the different contexts that impacted the choices of what constitute an appropriate attire for distinct situations. African dress in this context is not a fixed relic from the past, but a live cultural item that is influenced by the surrounding forces.
                                                                                      AFRC 325-401 AUGUST WILSON AND BEYOND BERGER, SUZANA
                                                                                      BEAVERS, HERMAN
                                                                                      3401 WALNUT STREET 330A M 0200PM-0500PM The purpose of this course is to engage students in the rigorous process of mining experiences for material that can be transformed into a public performance piece. In-class writing, group discussions, and field work in the Philadelphia area. AUGUST WILSON AND BEYOND. The people need to know the story. See how they fit into it. See what part they play. - August Wilson, King Hedley II. In this seminar, students will read groundbreaking playwright August Wilson's 20th Century Cycle: ten plays that form an iconic picture of African American traumas, triumphs, and traditions through the decades, told through the lens of Pittsburgh's Hill District neighborhood. Other readings include supporting material on Wilson's work and African American theatre, the works of contemporary playwrights whom Wilson has influenced (such as Suzan-Lori Parks and Tarell Alvin McCraney), and context on Penn's relationship with West Philadelphia. As an Academically Based Community Service (ABCS) course,this seminar gives students the opportunity to enhance their understanding of the plays, and history and culture that shaped them, by forming meaningful relationships with West Philadelphia residents. Wilson's plays provide the bridge between the two groups. The course culminates with students writing an original theatre piece inspired by the readings and relationships, which they will share at an end-of-semester performance.
                                                                                        CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                                                        AFRC 335-401 "WHERE MY GIRLS AT?":AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN PERFORMERS IN THE 20TH CENTURY TILLET, SALAMISHAH CANCELED African American women performers from blues woman Bessie Smith to Paris revue star Josephine Baker, from jazz darling Billie Holiday to rock legend Tina Turner, and from hip hop giant Lauryn Hill to millennial star Beyonc¿, have constantly redefined and expanded American popular music. Using the long 20th century as our historical marker, this course will explore how African American women performers, across genres and time, have consciously and sometimes contradictorily navigated the racial and sexual limits of American popular culture in order to assert their own particular narratives of artistic and political freedom.
                                                                                          CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                                          AFRC 345-401 SINNERS, SEX AND SLAVES: RACE AND SEX IN EARLY AMERICA BROWN, KATHLEEN MCNEIL BUILDING 286-7 MW 1200PM-0100PM This course explores the lost worlds of sinners, witches, sexual offenders, rebellious slaves, and Native American prophets from the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries. Using the life stories of unusual individuals from the past, we try to make sense of their contentious relationships with their societies. By following the careers of the trouble-makers, the criminals, and the rebels, we also learn about the foundations of social order and the impulse to reform that rocked American society during the nineteenth century.
                                                                                            SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                                            AFRC 350-680 ADVANCED ZULU I MBEJE, AUDREY FISHER-BENNETT HALL 19 MW 1030AM-1200PM
                                                                                              CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                              AFRC 362-680 ADVANCED TWI I OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA TBA TBA-
                                                                                                CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                AFRC 387-401 BLK FEMINIST APPROACHES: BLACK FEMINIST APPROACHES TO HISTORY AND MEMORY JOHNSON, GRACE CANCELED Topics vary: Black Feminist Approaches to History & Memory - The term black feminism emerged in public discourse amid the social, political, and cultural turbulence of the 1960s. The roots of black feminism, however, are much older, easily reaching back to the work of black women abolitionists and social critics of the nineteenth century. The concept continued to grow and evolve in the work of twentieth century black women writers, journalists, activists, and educators as they sought to document black women's lives. Collectively, their work established black feminism as a political practice dedicated to the equality of all people. More recently, black feminism has been deployed as a tool for theoretical and scholarly analysis that is characterized by an understanding that race, class, gender, and sexuality are inextricably interconnected. Using materials such as slave narratives, social criticism, and archival sources, this course will explore the theoretical and practical applications of black feminist thought in nineteenth and twentieth century North American culture and politics. In particular, we will consider the symbols and practices (storytelling, myth-making, art, archival research) that black women use to document lives. We will ask: how do these methods of documentation inform our understanding of the past and the production of historical knowledge? How can we understand black feminism as both theory and practice? And what are the implications of black feminist approaches for current research and scholarship? We will give particular attention to concepts such as gender, race, memory, the archive, and embodied knowledge to complicate our understanding of historical documentation, epistemology, and authenticity. The course material will include scholarship by Harriet Jacobs, Audre Lorde, Saidiya Hartman, Hazel Carby, Hershini Young, Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, Toni Morrison, and others. (Image: From In Praise of Shadows, Kara Walker (2009). See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.
                                                                                                  AFRC 400-401 BLACKS IN AMERICAN FILM AND TELEVISION BOGLE, DONALD DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 3N6 M 0500PM-0800PM This course is an examination and analysis of the changing images and achievements of African Americans in motion pictures and television. The first half of the course focuses on African-American film images from the early years of D.W. Griffith's "renegade bucks" in The Birth of a Nation (1915); to the comic servants played by Steppin Fetchit, Hattie McDaniel, and others during the Depression era; to the post-World War II New Negro heroes and heroines of Pinky (1949) and The Defiant Ones (1958); to the rise of the new movement of African American directors such as Spike Lee (Do the Right Thing), Julie Dash (Daughters of the Dust), Charles Burnett, (To Sleep With Anger) and John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood). The second half explores television images from the early sitcoms "Amos 'n Andy" and "Beulah" to the "Cosby Show," "Fresh Prince of Bel Air," and "Martin." Foremost this course will examine Black stereotypes in American films and television--and the manner in which those stereotypes have reflected national attitudes and outlooks during various historical periods. The in-class screenings and discussions will include such films as Show Boat (1936), the independently produced "race movies" of the 1930s and 1940s, Cabin in the Sky (1943), The Defiant Ones (1958), Imitation of Life (the 1959 remake) & Super Fly (1972).
                                                                                                    CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                                                    AFRC 417-401 COMPARATIVE RACIAL POLI: COMPARATIVE RACIAL POLITICS HANCHARD, MICHAEL CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 402 TR 0300PM-0420PM This course combines scholarship on race and racism in plural societies with qualitative approaches to the study of political institutions, phenomena and actors. Germany, Brazil, France and Cuba will be examined as individual country cases and in comparative perspective. Conceptual and theoretical readings on race, racism and politics provide students with the analytic tools to draw more abstract lessons and generalizable conclusions about how racial and ethno-national hierarchy involves the role of the state and political economy, culture, norms and institutions. Students will also examine the impact of civil rights movements for political equality in response to legacies of racial and ethno-national hierarchy and inequality. Finally, students will become familiar with scholarship on nationalism and social movements as they relate to racial politics.
                                                                                                      AFRC 420-601 The US and Human Rights: Policies and Practices FETNI, HOCINE MCNEIL BUILDING 410 M 0630PM-0930PM Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's course list at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offering. Fall 2017:After an examination of the philosophical, legal, and political perspectives on Human Rights, this course will focus on US policies and practices relevant to Human Rights. Toward that end, emphasis will be placed on both the domestic and the international aspects of Human Rights as reflected in US policies and practices. Domestically, the course will discuss (1) the process of incorporating the International Bill of Human Rights into the American legal system and (2) the US position on and practices regarding the political, civil, economic, social, and cultural rights of minorities and various other groups within the US. Internationally, the course will examine US Human Rights policies toward Africa. Specific cases of Rwanda, Kenya, South Africa and Egypt, as well as other cases from the continent, will be presented in the assessment of US successes and failures in the pursuit of its Human Rights strategy in Africa. Readings will include research papers, reports, statutes, treaties, and cases.
                                                                                                        CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                                                        AFRC 480-601 LIBERATION & OWNERSHIP LAMAS, ANDREW MCNEIL BUILDING 167-8 M 0500PM-0800PM Who is going to own what we all have a part of creating? The history of the Americas, and of all peoples everywhere, is an evolving answer to the question of ownership. Ownership is about: the ties that bind and those that separate; the creation of community and the imposition of hierarchies; the dream of home ownership and ecological despoliation; dependency and the slave yearning to breathe free. Of all the issues relevant to democracy, oppression, and economic injustice, ownership is arguably the most important and least understood. Utilizing a variety of disciplinary perspectives, and by focusing on particular global sites, students will assess and refine their views regarding ownership in light of their own social, political, religious, and/or ethical commitments.
                                                                                                          CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                                                          AFRC 516-401 TOPICS IN AFRICAN ART CANCELED
                                                                                                            AFRC 533-401 POL.CULTURE&AMER CITIES: POLITICAL CULTURE AND AMERICAN CITIES REED, ADOLPH 3440 MARKET STREET 300 T 0600PM-0900PM This course is cross-listed when the subject matter is related to African, African American, or other African Diaspora issues. Courses recently offered are, "Political Culture and American Cities, Social Movements and Social Change, Critical Race Theory. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. This course brings together the vantage points of urban political economy, history and urban anthropology. Readings and discussions will cross those literatures, folding in considerations of race, ethnicity and gender in the American city life, with a focus on the relation between culture and political economy. We will reconstruct the history of the different tracks of urban studies in the U.S., beginning with its roots in sociology and anthropology in the Chicago School and in political science in reform-oriented studies of public administration. We will revisit the community power debate of the 1950s-1970s, which shook out significantly along disciplinary lines, and will examine the development of the urban political economy perspective in the 1980s and 1990s, as well as developments within U.S. urban anthropology since the 1960s. We will employ local case study materials, and at every point we will try to understand the intellectual trajectories of the urbanist discourses in relation to dynamics contemporaneously shaping urban politics and policy. Course requirements are seminar preparation which includes each student's leading discussion around specified reading assignments -- and a research paper, the topic of which must be approved by week 5.
                                                                                                              AFRC 540-680 ELEMENTARY AMHARIC I HAILU, YOHANNES WILLIAMS HALL 6 MW 0530PM-0730PM An introductory course for students with no previous knowledge of Amharic. Amharic belongs to the southern branch of Hemeto-Semitic languages which is also referred to as "Afrasian." Amharic is the official language of Ethiopia and is spoken by 14 million native Amharas and by approximately 19 million of the other ethnic groups in Ethiopia. The goals of this course are to introduce students to the culture, customs, and traditions of the Amharas. Students will develop communicative skills through listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
                                                                                                                LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                AFRC 543-680 INTERMEDIATE AMHARIC I HAILU, YOHANNES WILLIAMS HALL 6 MW 0730PM-0900PM Offered through the Penn Language Center
                                                                                                                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                  AFRC 547-401 RELIGIONS OF AFRICANA DIASPORA BUTLER, ANTHEA T 0130PM-0430PM Religions of the African Diaspora - Religion shapes and defines the lives of many persons in the Africans Diaspora. This course will explore both the historical and present day manifestations of religions practices by those in the African Diaspora, including Voodu, Candomble, Obeah, Rastafari, African Initiated Churches, Pentecostalism, and Catholicism. Theoretical issues including sexuality, gender, and material culture will also be covered in the course.
                                                                                                                    AFRC 548-680 ADVANCED AMHARIC WILLIAMS HALL 318 TR 0700PM-0830PM An advanced Amharic course that will further sharpen the students' knowledge of the Amharic language and the culture of the Amharas. The learners communicative skills will be further developed through listening, speaking, reading and wwriting. There will also be discussions on cultural and political issues.
                                                                                                                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                      AFRC 569-401 TPCS IN AFRO-AMER LIT: JAMES BALDWIN WOUBSHET, DAGMAWI FISHER-BENNETT HALL 222 R 0900AM-1200PM This course covers topics in 20th-century literature, its emphasis varying with instructor.
                                                                                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                        AFRC 575-401 PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL INTERACTIONS WITH BLACK MALES CARTER, ROBERT
                                                                                                                        STEVENSON, HOWARD
                                                                                                                        PSYCHOLOGY LAB B35 R 0430PM-0630PM This course is designed to present quantitative and qualitative approaches to studying and evaluating developmental interventions for children and youth. Basic assumptions underlying the two overarching methodological orientations will be presented throughout the course as a means of determining which sets of methods to use for different types of research and evaluation questions. In addition to presenting quantitative and qualitative methods separately, the course also will present integrative or mixed-methods approaches.
                                                                                                                          CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                                                                          AFRC 591-401 POSTCOLONIAL STUDIES WILLIAMS HALL 217 R 0200PM-0400PM SPRING 2016: This seminar will introduce key authors and issues in Francophone studies through texts that specifically focus on various experiences of war in colonial and postcolonial contexts. Significantly, the first piece of fiction by an African author may well be Bakary Diallo's Force Bonte, (1926), the autobiographical story of a WWI Senegalese Tirailleur, physically deformed by his war experience and trying to through his writing. While Force Bont¿ is unique as an early piece, similar narratives have not ceased to proliferate in French and Francophone fiction. Indeed, writers from all over the former French Empire have repeatedly offered fictional accounts of colonial subjects' involvement in European wars, and especially WWII, with various degrees of ambivalence. As conflicts and genocides continue, the experience of war fuels a new wave of Francophone accounts at the turn of the twenty-first century. We will use an extensive diachronically and synchronically developed reading (and viewing) list of texts and films from Senegal, Congo, Rwanda, Guinea, Algeria, Martinique, Mauritius, and (Metropolitan) France from the 1920s to 2014. Using this material as the basis for our exploration we will address several questions: What are some of the important tropes deployed in these narratives and how do they relate to broader issues concerning colonial and postcolonial violence? How do the wars of others (e.g. WWI and WWII) complicate the experience of war and questions of engagement and solidarity? How do such experiences lay the groundwork for other wars, of liberation, for example? Finally how does war impact the articulation of memory, survival and writing in colonial contexts, in the postcolony, and in the European Metropole? Primary texts in French. Class discussion in French or English.
                                                                                                                            AFRC 601-401 COLORISM AND AFRICAN AMERICANS (HD) ABIOLA, UFUOMA EDUCATION BUILDING 300 W 0630PM-0830PM This course critically examines colorism as it relates to African Americans and the evolving meanings conected to this phenomenon. Colorism is the discrimination based on gradations of skin color and is related to and distinct from racism. Colorism typically privileges lighter-skinned individuals and penalizes darker-skinned individuals within and across racial and ethnic groups. Four broad themes will guide this course; 1) the history and development of colorism; 2) the psychology and politics of colorism; 3) gender and colorism; and 4) colorism and the media.
                                                                                                                              AFRC 630-401 DEMOGRAPHY OF RACE ZUBERI, TUKUFU MCNEIL BUILDING 110 W 0900AM-1200PM DEMOGRAPHY OF RACE:This course examine demographic and statistical methods used to capture of impact of racial stratification in society. This course covers the skills and insights used by demographers and social statisticians in the study of racial data. A key challenge facing researchers is the interpretation of the vast amount of racial data generated by society. As these data do not directly answer important social questions, data analysis and statistics must be used to interpret them. The course will examine the logic used to communicate statistical results from racial data in various societies. We will question the scientific claims of social science methodology by extending the critical perspective to biases that may underlie research methods. We will discuss good practices within the context of the historical development of the methods.
                                                                                                                                AFRC 640-301 PROSEMINAR IN AFRICANA STUDIES BEAVERS, HERMAN DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 2N36 W 0200PM-0500PM This course focuses on the historical and cultural relationship between Africans and their descendants abroad.
                                                                                                                                  AFRC 668-401 HISTORY OF LAW AND SOCIAL POLICY BERRY, MARY COLLEGE HALL 216E T 0130PM-0430PM This is a course in the history of law and policy-making with respect to selected social problems. Discussion of assigned readings and papers will elaborate the role law, lawyers, judges, other public official and policy advocates have played in proposing solutions to specific problems. The course will permit the evaluation of the importance of historical perspective and legal expertise in policy debates.
                                                                                                                                    AFRC 705-401 SEM IN ETHNOMUSICOLOGY MULLER, CAROL CANCELED This course is cross-listed with MUSC 705 (Seminar in Ethnomusicology) when the subject matter is related to African, African American, or other African Diaspora issues. Recent courses offered include "Reading Women in Jazz," "Popular Music and the Ethics of Style in the Caribben," "Music and Tourism in the Caribbean," and "Imagining Africa Musically." See the Africana Studies Department's course list at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description ofthe current offering.
                                                                                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                      AFRC 710-401 FASCISM AND RACISM: A LOVE STORY HANCHARD, MICHAEL FISHER-BENNETT HALL 138 W 1000AM-0100PM This course provides the opportunity for students to investigate the relationship between the emergence of African peoples as historical subjects and their location within specific geopolitical and economic circumstances. Topics vary. FALL 2017: FASCISM AND RACISM: A LOVE STORY- What is the relationship between fascism and racism in modern politics, and how have black political thinkers and organizations understood this relationship? This graduate level course is designed to familiarize students with the historical and contemporary literature on fascism as a phenomena of modern politics, and the importance of racial politics and ideologies to its constitution. Students will become familiar with the contributions of Black political actors, organizations and thinkers in Europe, Africa, Asia and the New World to fascism's defeat in the 1920's and 1930's, as well as more contemporary efforts to curb more contemporary fascist movements, regimes and aesthetics in late modernity. Antonio Gramsci, Robert Paxton, Michael Mann, C.L.R. James, George Padmore, Aime Cesaire, Suzanne Cesaire and Hannah Arendt are among the thinkers, theorists and activists students will encounter in this course. The overarching aim of his course is to identify fascism in both historical and contemporary contexts as a very specific form of political organization and rule, and its interrelationship with racism, nationalism and xenophobia.
                                                                                                                                        AFRC 723-401 MULTICULTURAL ISSUES IN EDUCATION GADSDEN, VIVIAN EDUCATION BUILDING 203 M 0430PM-0700PM This course examines critical issues, problems, and perspectives in multicultural education. Intended to focus on access to literacy and educational opportunity, the course will engage class members in discussions around a variety of topics in educational practice, research, and policy. Specifically, the course will (1) review theoretical frameworks in multicultural education, (2) analyze the issues of race, racism, and culture in historical and contemporary perspectives, and (3) identify obstacles to participation in the educational process by diverse cultural and ethnic groups. Students will be required to complete field experiences and classroom activities that enable them to reflect on their own belief systems, practices, and educational experiences.
                                                                                                                                          AFRC 770-401 21ST C AFRICAN AMER LIT: TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE CRAWFORD, MARGO FISHER-BENNETT HALL 140 R 1200PM-0300PM How does Elizabeth Alexanders poem Praise Song for the Day, written for the inauguration of Barack Obama, relate to Amiri Barakas 9/11 poem Somebody Blew America? This seminar will explore the unnaming and experimentation that shape African American literature and theory in the early years of the 21st century. frameworks of the seminar will include the post-9/11 novel, the poetics of the black, black abstraction, twenty-first century practices of the black diaspora Age of Obama turn to the satirical. Critical texts such as How to See a Work Total Darkness and Abstractionist Aesthetics will be as central as cutting edgesuch as The Psychic Hold of Slavery and signature essays such as On Failing to the Past Present. This course will focus on the new literary voices that have the 21st century and, also, writers whose 21st century art is the late stage ofliterary trajectory. Special attention will be given to Toni Morrison, Colson Whitehead,Octavia Butler, Claudia Rankine, Mat Johnson, and Paul Beatty.
                                                                                                                                            AFST 050-401 WORLD MUSICS & CULTURES ROMMEN, TIMOTHY FISHER-BENNETT HALL 419 TR 1030AM-1200PM Draws on repertories of various societies from Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas to examine relations between aesthetic productions and social processes. We investigate musical sounds, cultural logics informing those sounds, and social strategies of performance. Topics may include indigenous music theories, music and social organization, symbolic expressions and musical meaning, gender, religion, and social change.
                                                                                                                                              Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                                                              AFST 050-402 WORLD MUSICS & CULTURES ZHANG, SHELLEY LERNER CENTER (MUSIC BUILDING 101 MWF 1000AM-1100AM Draws on repertories of various societies from Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas to examine relations between aesthetic productions and social processes. We investigate musical sounds, cultural logics informing those sounds, and social strategies of performance. Topics may include indigenous music theories, music and social organization, symbolic expressions and musical meaning, gender, religion, and social change.
                                                                                                                                                Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                                                                AFST 076-401 LECTURE CASSANELLI, LEE COLLEGE HALL 200 MW 1200PM-0100PM Survey of major themes, events, and personalities in African history from the early nineteenth century through the 1960s. Topics include abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism, impact of colonial rule, African resistance, religious and cultural movements, rise of naturalism and pan-Africanism, issues of ethnicity and "tribalism" in modern Africa.
                                                                                                                                                  History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                                                                  AFST 150-680 ELEMENTARY ZULU I MBEJE, AUDREY WILLIAMS HALL 302 MW 0300PM-0500PM The elementary Zulu I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on South Africa, Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Zulu II course materials.
                                                                                                                                                    LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                    AFST 160-680 ELEMENTARY TWI I OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA WILLIAMS HALL 301 TR 0430PM-0630PM The Elementary Twi I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on Ghana/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Twi. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also a part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Twi II course materials.
                                                                                                                                                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                      AFST 170-680 ELEMENTARY YORUBA I AWOYALE, YIWOLA FISHER-BENNETT HALL 140 MW 0500PM-0700PM The Elementary Yoruba I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on Nigeria and the diaspora/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Yoruba. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilibilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Yoruba II course materials.
                                                                                                                                                        LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                        AFST 180-680 ELEMENTARY SWAHILI I MSHOMBA, ELAINE WILLIAMS HALL 217 TR 1200PM-0200PM The Elementary Swahili I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on East Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative compentence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Swahili. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Swahili II course materials.
                                                                                                                                                          LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                          AFST 190-401 INTRODUCTION TO AFRICA HASTY, MARY COLLEGE HALL 314 TR 0900AM-1030AM This course provides an introduction to the study of Africa in all its diversity and complexity. Our focus is cultural, geographical, and historical: we will seek to understand Africa s current place in the world political and economic order and learn about the various social and physical factors that have influenced the historical trajectory of the continent. We study the cultural formations and empires that emerged in Africa before European colonial invasion and then how colonialism reshaped those sociocultural forms. We ll learn about the unique kinds of kinship and religion in precolonial Africa and the changes brought about by the spread of Islam and Christianity. Finally, we ll take a close look at contemporary issues such as ethnic violence, migration, popular culture and poverty, and we'll debate the various approaches to understanding those issues.
                                                                                                                                                            Society sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SOCIETY SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
                                                                                                                                                            AFST 223-601 STORYTELLING IN AFRICA BLAKELY, PAMELA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 T 0430PM-0730PM
                                                                                                                                                              CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                                                                              AFST 240-680 ELEMENTARY AMHARIC I HAILU, YOHANNES WILLIAMS HALL 6 MW 0530PM-0730PM The Elementary Amharic I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on Ethiopia/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Amharic. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Amharic II course materials.
                                                                                                                                                                LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                AFST 242-680 INTERMEDIATE AMHARIC I HAILU, YOHANNES WILLIAMS HALL 6 MW 0730PM-0900PM
                                                                                                                                                                  PRIOR LANGUAGE EXPERIENCE REQUIRED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                  AFST 247-680 ADVANCED AMHARIC: ADVANCED AMHARIC PART I WILLIAMS HALL 318 TR 0700PM-0830PM An advanced Amharic course that will further sharpen the students' knowledge of the Amharic language and the culture of the Amharas. The learners communicative skills will be further developed through listening, speaking, reading and writing. There will also be discussions on cultural and political issues.
                                                                                                                                                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                    AFST 249-680 AMHARIC LANG & CULTURE I HAILU, YOHANNES TBA TBA-
                                                                                                                                                                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                      AFST 250-680 INTERMEDIATE ZULU I MBEJE, AUDREY WILLIAMS HALL 3 TR 0300PM-0500PM
                                                                                                                                                                        PRIOR LANGUAGE EXPERIENCE REQUIRED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                        AFST 262-680 INTERMEDIATE TWI I OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA WILLIAMS HALL 301 TR 0630PM-0800PM
                                                                                                                                                                          PRIOR LANGUAGE EXPERIENCE REQUIRED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                          AFST 268-401 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN AFRICAN SOCIETY IMOAGENE, ONOSO CLAIRE M. FAGIN HALL (NURSING 219 T 0130PM-0430PM This course will deal with law and society in Africa. After surveying the various legal systems in Africa, the focus will be on how and to what extent the countries of Africa "re-Africanized" their legal systems by reconciling their indigenous law with western law and other legal traditions to create unified legal systems that are used as instruments of social change and development. Toward this end, the experiences of various African countries covering the various legal traditions will be included. Specific focus will be on laws covering both economic and social relations. This emphasis includes laws of contracts and civil wrongs, land law, law of succession, marriage and divorce and Africa's laws of International Relations, among other laws. Throughout this course a comparative analysis with non-African countries will be stressed.
                                                                                                                                                                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                                                                                            AFST 270-680 INTERMEDIATE YORUBA I AWOYALE, YIWOLA WILLIAMS HALL 302 TR 0500PM-0630PM
                                                                                                                                                                              PRIOR LANGUAGE EXPERIENCE REQUIRED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                              AFST 274-401 FACES OF ISLAM IN AFRICA BABOU, CHEIKH COLLEGE HALL 311F TR 1030AM-1200PM This course is designed to provide the students with a broad understanding of the history of Islam in Africa. The focus will be mostly on West Africa, but we will also look at developments in other regions of the continent. We will examine the process of islamization in Africa and the interplay between Islam and the African traditional religions and customs. Topics include conversion, Islamic education and literacy, the status of women, Muslim responses to European colonial domination, Islamic mysticism, and the contemporary development of Sunni movements.
                                                                                                                                                                                CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                                                                                                AFST 280-680 INTERMEDIATE SWAHILI I MSHOMBA, ELAINE WILLIAMS HALL 217
                                                                                                                                                                                WILLIAMS HALL 217
                                                                                                                                                                                TR 1030AM-1200PM
                                                                                                                                                                                F 0300PM-0400PM
                                                                                                                                                                                  PRIOR LANGUAGE EXPERIENCE REQUIRED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                  AFST 284-680 ADVANCED SWAHILI I MSHOMBA, ELAINE WILLIAMS HALL 217
                                                                                                                                                                                  WILLIAMS HALL 217
                                                                                                                                                                                  TR 0900AM-1030AM
                                                                                                                                                                                  F 0400PM-0500PM
                                                                                                                                                                                  This is an advanced Kiswahili course which will engage learners in extended spoken and written discourse. Advanced learners of Kiswahili will listen to, read about, write and speak on authentic video materials, contemporary novels, and newspapers. They will also participate in various discussions on cultural and political issues.
                                                                                                                                                                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                    AFST 297-001 STUDY ABROAD TBA TBA-
                                                                                                                                                                                      AFST 350-680 ADVANCED ZULU I MBEJE, AUDREY FISHER-BENNETT HALL 19 MW 1030AM-1200PM
                                                                                                                                                                                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                        AFST 362-680 ADVANCED TWI I OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA TBA TBA-
                                                                                                                                                                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                          AFST 370-680 ADVANCED YORUBA I AWOYALE, YIWOLA WILLIAMS HALL 302 TR 0700PM-0900PM
                                                                                                                                                                                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                            AFST 460-401 MIDDLE EGYPTIAN SILVERMAN, DAVID UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 328 TR 1200PM-0130PM Introduction to the grammar of Middle Egyptian.
                                                                                                                                                                                              AFST 467-401 HIST EGYPT NEW KINGDOM WEGNER, JOSEF TR 0300PM-0430PM Covers principal aspects of ancient Egyptian culture (environment, urbanism, religion, technology, etc.) with special focus on archaeological data; includes study of University Museum artifacts. Follows AMES 266/466 - History of Egypt taught in the Fall semester.
                                                                                                                                                                                                AFST 470-680 TWI LANGUAGE & CULTURE I OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA TBA TBA-
                                                                                                                                                                                                  AFST 484-680 SWAHILI LANG & CULTURE I MSHOMBA, ELAINE TBA TBA- This course taught in Swahili will focus on reading/writing skills and speaking/listening skills as well as structural and cultural information. The course will be structured around three thematic units: History, Politics, and Education. The course will provide background on the Swahili-speaking world: Who were the first Swahili speakers and what varieties of the language did they speak? How did Swahili spread from the coast to other Swahili-speaking areas as far inland as Uganda, Rwanda, and Congo? Swahili is a lingua franca and has importance in the spread of religion and trade movements. Influences of other languages on Swahili and influences of Swahili on local languages will be discussed. Political and educational systems will be discussed as well.
                                                                                                                                                                                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                    AFST 486-680 YORUBA LANG & CULTURE I AWOYALE, YIWOLA WILLIAMS HALL 218 TR 0300PM-0430PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                      AFST 490-680 MALAGASY -AFR LG ELEM I WINTERTON, MATTHEW WILLIAMS HALL 6 TR 0700PM-0900PM The main objective of this course is to allow students to study an African language of their choice, depending on the availability of the instructor. The course will provide students with linquistics tools which will facilitate their research work in the target country. Cultural aspects of the speakers of the language will be introduced and reinforced.
                                                                                                                                                                                                        LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                        AFST 490-681 AFR LANG TUTORIAL:ELEM I: IGBO-AFR LANG ELEM I NWADIORA, CHIKA FISHER-BENNETT HALL 19 TR 0500PM-0700PM The main objective of this course is to allow students to study an African language of their choice, depending on the availability of the instructor. The course will provide students with linquistics tools which will facilitate their research work in the target country. Cultural aspects of the speakers of the language will be introduced and reinforced.
                                                                                                                                                                                                          LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                          AFST 490-682 WOLOF-AFR LANG ELEM I THIOUNE, MBACKE TBA TBA- The main objective of this course is to allow students to study an African language of their choice, depending on the availability of the instructor. The course will provide students with linquistics tools which will facilitate their research work in the target country. Cultural aspects of the speakers of the language will be introduced and reinforced.
                                                                                                                                                                                                            LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                            AFST 490-683 AFR LANG TUTORIAL:ELEM I: TIGRINYA - ELEM I ZEMICHAEL, ERMIAS WILLIAMS HALL 219 TR 0500PM-0700PM The main objective of this course is to allow students to study an African language of their choice, depending on the availability of the instructor. The course will provide students with linquistics tools which will facilitate their research work in the target country. Cultural aspects of the speakers of the language will be introduced and reinforced.
                                                                                                                                                                                                              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                              AFST 490-684 MALAGASY -AFR LG ELEM I WINTERTON, MATTHEW WILLIAMS HALL 4 MW 0700PM-0900PM The main objective of this course is to allow students to study an African language of their choice, depending on the availability of the instructor. The course will provide students with linquistics tools which will facilitate their research work in the target country. Cultural aspects of the speakers of the language will be introduced and reinforced.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                AFST 490-687 MANDING - ELEM I DONALDSON, COLEMAN WILLIAMS HALL 438 MW 0500PM-0730PM The main objective of this course is to allow students to study an African language of their choice, depending on the availability of the instructor. The course will provide students with linquistics tools which will facilitate their research work in the target country. Cultural aspects of the speakers of the language will be introduced and reinforced.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  AFST 490-688 CHICHEWA-AFR LANG ELEM I MWAYA, MONDA WILLIAMS HALL 633 TR 0630PM-0830PM The main objective of this course is to allow students to study an African language of their choice, depending on the availability of the instructor. The course will provide students with linquistics tools which will facilitate their research work in the target country. Cultural aspects of the speakers of the language will be introduced and reinforced.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    AFST 490-689 SETSWANA-AFR LANG ELEM I TBA TBA- The main objective of this course is to allow students to study an African language of their choice, depending on the availability of the instructor. The course will provide students with linquistics tools which will facilitate their research work in the target country. Cultural aspects of the speakers of the language will be introduced and reinforced.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                      AFST 492-680 MALAGASY - AFR LG INT I ALDOUS, TRAVIS WILLIAMS HALL 216 MW 0500PM-0700PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                        LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                        AFST 492-681 AFR LANG TUTOR: INTERM I: IGBO-AFR LANG INTER I NWADIORA, CHIKA FISHER-BENNETT HALL 19 TR 0700PM-0830PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          AFST 492-682 WOLOF - AFR LANG INTER I THIOUNE, MBACKE WILLIAMS HALL 217 MW 0500PM-0630PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                            LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                            AFST 492-683 TIGRINYA - INTERM I ZEMICHAEL, ERMIAS WILLIAMS HALL 219 TR 0700PM-0830PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                              AFST 492-686 MALAGASY - AFR LG INT I ALDOUS, TRAVIS WILLIAMS HALL 216 MW 0700PM-0900PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                AFST 492-687 SETSWANA-AFR LG INTER I CANCELED
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  AFST 492-688 CHICHEWA - INTER II MWAYA, MONDA WILLIAMS HALL 633 MW 0600PM-0730PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    AFST 494-680 AFR LANG TUTOR: ADV I TBA TBA-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      AFST 494-681 IGBO-AFR LANG ADV I NWADIORA, CHIKA TR 0700PM-0900PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        AFST 494-682 WOLOF-AFR LANG ADV I THIOUNE, MBACKE TBA TBA-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          AFST 494-683 TIGRINYA-AFR LANG ADV I TBA TBA-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            AFST 494-684 MALAGASY - ADV I TBA TBA-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              AFST 494-686 AFRIKAANS-AFR LANG ADV I TBA TBA-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                AFST 494-687 MANINKA-AFR LANG ADV I CANCELED
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  AFST 494-688 CHICHEWA - ADV LANG I TBA TBA-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    AFST 496-680 TIGRINYA LANG AND CULT FISHER-BENNETT HALL 19 MW 0300PM-0500PM Aspects of the targeted language's history, language, and culture.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      AFST 496-681 IGBO LANG & CULTURE I NWADIORA, CHIKA FISHER-BENNETT HALL 20 MW 0700PM-0900PM Aspects of the targeted language's history, language, and culture.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        AFST 517-680 ELEMENTARY YORUBA I AWOYALE, YIWOLA FISHER-BENNETT HALL 140 MW 0500PM-0700PM This is an introductory course in Yoruba whose goals are to introduce students to the history, geographical location of the people who speak Yoruba, their culture, customs, and traditions; and, to enable students to develop communicative skills through listening, speaking, reading and writing.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          AFST 529-680 INTERMEDIATE YORUBA I AWOYALE, YIWOLA WILLIAMS HALL 302 TR 0500PM-0630PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            AFST 540-680 ELEMENTARY AMHARIC I HAILU, YOHANNES WILLIAMS HALL 6 MW 0530PM-0730PM An introductory course for students with no previous knowledge of Amharic. Amharic belongs to the southern branch of Hemeto-Semitic languages which is also referred to as "Afrasian." Amharic is the official language of Ethiopia and is spoken by 14 million native Amharas and by approximately 18 million of the other ethic groups in Ethiopia. The goals of this course are to introduce students to the culture, customs, and traditions of the Amharas. Students will develop communicative skills through listening, speaking, reading and writing.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              AFST 543-680 INTERMEDIATE AMHARIC I HAILU, YOHANNES WILLIAMS HALL 6 MW 0730PM-0900PM Offered through Penn Language Center
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                AFST 547-680 ADVANCED AMHARIC: ADVANCED AMHARIC PART I WILLIAMS HALL 318 TR 0700PM-0830PM An advanced Amharic course that will further sharpen the students' knowledge of the Amharic language and the culture of the Amharas. The learners communicative skills will be further developed through listening, speaking, reading and wwriting. There will also be discussions on cultural and political issues.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  AFST 548-680 SUDANESE ARABIC I ALI-DINAR, ALI TBA TBA- Sudan is a country with a rich history and diverse cultures and people. Sudan is surrounded by nine countries. Two of Sudan's neighbors have Arabic as their official language (Egypt & Libya). While in neighboring Chad and Eritrea, Arabic is widely spoken. The only barrier that divides Sudan from Arabia is the Red Sea. Arabic is the official language of the Sudan, and Sudanese pidgin Arabic (Juba Arabic) is widely used in the southern part of the country. Sudanese colloquial Arabic has close resemblance to Egyptian Colloquial Arabic and to Classical Arabic. Sudanese colloquial Arabic is also spoken and is intelligible in Eritrea, Chad, Nigeria and many places in West Africa. This course will focus on speaking, listening, reading, & writing Sudanese Arabic through the followings: 1- Speaking: Conversing in Sudanese Arabic in various settings. 2- Reading & Writing: Reading and writing of Sudanese Arabic Texts. 3- Listening: Listening to various audio recordings of Sudanese Arabic in different forms and settings.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    AFST 550-680 ELEMENTARY ZULU I MBEJE, AUDREY WILLIAMS HALL 302 MW 0300PM-0500PM The elementary Zulu I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on South Africa, Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills a the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice levelproficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Zulu II course materials.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      AFST 552-680 INTERMEDIATE ZULU I MBEJE, AUDREY WILLIAMS HALL 3 TR 0300PM-0500PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        AFST 554-680 ADVANCED ZULU I MBEJE, AUDREY FISHER-BENNETT HALL 19 MW 1030AM-1200PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          AFST 562-680 ELEMENTARY TWI I OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA WILLIAMS HALL 301 TR 0430PM-0630PM The Elementary Twi I course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on Ghana/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Twi. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also a part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills at the mid-high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The mid-high novice level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the second semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Elementary Twi II course materials.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            AFST 566-680 INTERMEDIATE TWI I OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA WILLIAMS HALL 301 TR 0630PM-0800PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              AFST 568-680 ADVANCED TWI I OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA TBA TBA-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                AFST 580-680 ELEMENTARY SWAHILI I MSHOMBA, ELAINE WILLIAMS HALL 217 TR 1200PM-0200PM Beginning level of Swahili which provides training and practice in speaking, reading and writing with initial emphasis on speaking and listening. Basic grammar, vocabulary and cultural skills learned gradually with priority on the spoken language. Especially during the second term, folktales, other texts and films will be used to help introduce important aspects of Swahili culture.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  AFST 582-680 INTERMEDIATE SWAHILI I MSHOMBA, ELAINE WILLIAMS HALL 217
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  WILLIAMS HALL 217
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  TR 1030AM-1200PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  F 0300PM-0400PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    AFST 584-680 ADVANCED SWAHILI I MSHOMBA, ELAINE WILLIAMS HALL 217
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    WILLIAMS HALL 217
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    TR 0900AM-1030AM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    F 0400PM-0500PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    This is an advanced Kiswahili course which will engage learners in extended spoken and written discourse. Advanced learners of Kiswahili will listen to, read about, write and speak on authentic video materials, contemporary novels, and newspapers. They will also participate in various discussions on cultural and political issues.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      AFST 587-680 ADVANCED YORUBA I AWOYALE, YIWOLA WILLIAMS HALL 302 TR 0700PM-0900PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        AFST 590-680 SWAHILI LANG & CULTURE I MSHOMBA, ELAINE TBA TBA- This course taught in Swahili will focus on reading/writing skills and speaking/listening skills as well as structural and cultural information. The course will be structured around three thematic units: History, Politics, and Education. The course will provide background on the Swahili-speaking world: Who were the first Swahili speakers and what varieties of the language did they speak? How did Swahili spread from the coast to other Swahili-speaking areas as far inland as Uganda, Rwanda, and Congo? Swahili is a lingua franca and has importance in the spread of religion and trade movements. Influences of other languages on Swahili and influences of Swahili on local languages will be discussed. Political and educational systems will be discussed as well.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          AFST 594-682 WOLOF-AFR LANG ELEM I THIOUNE, MBACKE TBA TBA-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            AFST 594-684 MALAGASY -AFR LG ELEM I WINTERTON, MATTHEW WILLIAMS HALL 4 MW 0700PM-0900PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              AFST 594-687 MANINKA - AFR LG ELEM I DONALDSON, COLEMAN WILLIAMS HALL 438 MW 0500PM-0730PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                AFST 596-682 WOLOF - AFR LANG INTER I THIOUNE, MBACKE WILLIAMS HALL 217 MW 0500PM-0630PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  AFST 596-687 SETSWANA-AFR LG INTER I CANCELED
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    AFST 598-687 MANINKA-AFR LANG ADV I CANCELED
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS