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Courses for Spring 2018

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
AFRC 001-001 INTRODUCTION TO AFRICANA STUDIES HANCHARD, MICHAEL MW 0200PM-0330PM The aim of this course is to provide an interdisciplinary examination of the complex array of African American and other African Diaspora social practices and experiences. This class will focus on both classic texts and modern works that provide an introduction to the dynamics of African American and African Diaspora thought and practice. Topics include: What is Africana Studies?; The History Before 1492; Creating the African Diaspora After 1500; The Challenge of Freedom; Race, Gender and Class in the 20th Century; From Black Studies to Africana Studies: The Future of Africana Studies.
    Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
    AFRC 002-401 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY IMOAGENE, ONOSO MW 1100AM-1200PM We live in a country which places a premium on indivi dual accomplishments. Hence, all of you worked extremely hard to get into Penn. Yet, social factors also have an impact on life chance. This class provides an overview of how membership in social groups shapes the outcomes of individuals. We will look at a range of topics from the organizational factors which promoted racial inequality in Ferguson, Mo to the refusal of (mostly elite) parents to vaccinate their children. The experience of women and men in the labor market -- and the social factors that lead women to earn less than men -- is another interesting topic taken up in the course. Who gets ahead in America? Course requirements include a midterm, research paper (five to six pages), final and recitation activities. Students are not expected to have any previous knowledge of the topic. Welcome to the course!
      Society sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; SOCIETY SECTOR; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
      AFRC 002-601 INTRO TO SOCIOLOGY COX, AMANDA M 0430PM-0730PM We live in a country which places a premium on indivi dual accomplishments. Hence, all of you worked extremely hard to get into Penn. Yet, social factors also have an impact on life chance. This class provides an overview of how membership in social groups shapes the outcomes of individuals. We will look at a range of topics from the organizational factors which promoted racial inequality in Ferguson, Mo to the refusal of (mostly elite) parents to vaccinate their children. The experience of women and men in the labor market -- and the social factors that lead women to earn less than men -- is another interesting topic taken up in the course. Who gets ahead in America? Course requirements include a midterm, research paper (five to six pages), final and recitation activities. Students are not expected to have any previous knowledge of the topic. Welcome to the course!
        Society sector (all classes) CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; SOCIETY SECTOR; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
        AFRC 003-402 APPROACHES LITERARY STD: AFRO-ENCOUNTERS: DIASPORA AND THE BLACK IMAGINATION IRELE, AUGUSTA MW 0200PM-0330PM What does it mean to be African? What, in particular, does it mean to be "of Africa", for people who may have never been to the continent? How does diasporic African identity relate to the identity of Africans living in the continent? In this course, we will explore how Black American and Caribbean writers and filmmakers from both sides of the diaspora have used travel and immigrant narratives to call attention to affinities and differences in identification and experience. We will grapple with a series of questions about African diasporic identity. How do African authors regard members of of the Diaspora through their work? How has identification with the Diaspora transformed through literature and film over time? This course engages with music, film, and literature to explore the role that Africa has played in the diasporic imaginary. Students will interact with work from Langston Hughes, Aime Cesaire, Lorraine Hansberry, Jamaica Kincaid, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichiealong with films and contemporary music. Grading will be based primarily on oral presentations. The course is open to all students including those with no previous experience of literature.
          AFRC 008-401 THE SOCIOLOGY OF BLACK COMMUNITY CHARLES, CAMILLE T 0130PM-0430PM This course explores a broad set of issues defining important aspects of the Black/African American experience. In addition to the "usual suspects" (e.g., race, socioeconomic status, poverty, gender, and group culture), we also think about matters of health and well-being, the family, education, and identity in Black/African American communities. Our goal is to gain a deeper sociological understanding and appreciation of the diverse and ever-changing life experiences of Blacks/African Americans.
            FRESHMAN SEMINAR
            AFRC 017-401 Black Public Art in Philadelphia CRAWFORD, MARGO MW 0330PM-0500PM SPRING 2018: This seminar will introduce students to the power of public art. Outdoor murals, painted poetry, poetry performed outdoors, anti-museum sculpture, and outdoor theater will be the focus of this seminar. How does public art make the very idea of art gain new dimensions such as art as an event (not an object) and art as a community intervention? Our starting point will be outdoor murals in Philadelphia and other very recent art reconsidering the meaning of public monuments. In addition to our focus on contemporary public art in Philadelphia, we will focus on the role of public art in the 1960s and 1970s Black Arts Movement. The seminar will unveil the power of outdoor space to create art that has urgency and the openness of radical experimentation. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.
              CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
              AFRC 050-401 WORLD MUSICS & CULTURES SYKES, JAMES TR 1030AM-1200PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process.
                Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                AFRC 050-402 WORLD MUSICS & CULTURES ZHANG, SHELLEY MWF 1000AM-1100AM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process.
                  Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                  AFRC 050-403 WORLD MUSICS & CULTURES CAVICCHI, ELISE MWF 1200PM-0100PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process.
                    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                    AFRC 050-404 WORLD MUSICS & CULTURES BYNUM, ELIZABETH MWF 1100AM-1200PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process.
                      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                      AFRC 062-401 LAND OF THE PHARAOHS WEGNER, JOSEF TR 0300PM-0430PM This course provides an introduction to the society, culture and history of ancient Egypt. The objective of the course is to provide an understanding of the characteristics of the civilization of ancient Egypt and how that ancient society succeeded as one of the most successful and long-lived civilizations in world history.
                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                        AFRC 075-401 AFR HIST BEFORE 1800 DELL, JEREMY TR 0900AM-1030AM Survey of major themes and issues in African history before 1800. Topics include: early civilizations, African kingdoms and empires, population movements, the spread of Islam, and the slave trade. Also, emphasis on how historians use archaeology, linguistics, and oral traditions to reconstruct Africa's early history.
                          History & Tradition Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                          AFRC 077-401 JAZZ:STYLE & HISTORY RAMSEY, GUTHRIE TR 1200PM-0130PM This course is an exploration of the family of musical idioms called jazz. Attention will be given to issues of style development, selective musicians, and to the social and cultural conditions and the scholarly discourses that have informed the creation, dissemination and reception of this dynamic set of styles from the beginning of the 20th century to the present.
                            CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                            AFRC 078-401 Faculty-Student Collaborative Action Seminar in Urban Univ-Comm Relations HARKAVY, IRA W 0200PM-0500PM One of the goals of this seminar is to help students develop their capacity to solve strategic, real-world problems by working collaboratively in the classroom, on campus, and in the West Philadelphia community. Research teams help contribute to the improvement of education on campus and in the community, as well as the improvement of university-community relations. Among other responsibilities, students focus their community service on college and career readiness at West Philadelphia High School and Sayre High School. Students are typically engaged in academically based community service learning at the schools for two hours each week. A primary goal of the seminar is to help students develop proposals as to how a Penn undergraduate education might better empower students to produce, not simply "consume," societally-useful knowledge, as well as function as caring, contributing citizens of a democratic society. Please note new location of the class: The Netter Conference Room is on 111 South 38th Street, on the 2nd floor.
                              CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                              AFRC 085-401 1980S AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE WOUBSHET, DAGMAWI TR 1200PM-0130PM The readings for this course expose the student to a wide range of American fiction and poetry since World War II, giving considerable attention to recent work. Works may include All The King's Men by Robert Penn Warren, Herzog by Saul Bellow, On The Road by Jack Kerouac, V by Thomas Pynchon, Of Love and Dust by Ernest J.Gaines, A Flag For Sunrise by Robert Stone, The Killing Ground by Mary Lee Settle, and selected poem by Ginsberg, Plath, and Walcott. Readings vary from term to term.
                                CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                AFRC 093-401 SOUTH AFRICAN LIT/FILM BARNARD, RITA MW 0200PM-0330PM English is a global language with a distinctly imperial history, and this course serves as an essential introduction to literary works produced in or about the former European colonies. The focus will be poetry, film, fiction and non fiction and at least two geographic areas spanning the Americas, South Asia, the Caribbean and Africa as they reflect the impact of colonial rule on the cultural representations of identity, nationalism, race, class and gender. This course is cross-listed with ENGL 093 (Intro to postcolonial Lit) when the course content includes significant African American or other African Diaspora literatures.
                                  AFRC 101-401 TONI MORRISON AND THE ADVENTURE OF THE 21ST CENTURY BEAVERS, HERMAN TR 1030AM-1200PM This course introduces students to literary study through the works of a single author--often Shakespeare, but other versions will feature writers like Jane Austen, Geoffrey Chaucer, Herman Melville, and August Wilson. Readings an individual author across his or her entire career offers students the rare opportunity to examine works from several critical perspectives in a single course. What is the author's relation to his or her time? How do our author's works help us to understand literary history more generally? And how might be understand our author's legacy through performance, tributes, adaptations, or sequels? Exposing students to a range of approaches and assignments, this course is an ideal introduction to literary study for those students wishing to take an English course but not necessarily intending to major. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.
                                    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                    AFRC 112-401 RACE/SEX DISCRIMINATION: Race and Sex Discrimination MADDEN, JANICE MW 0200PM-0330PM This course is concerned with the structure, the causes and correlates, and the government policies to alleviate discrimination by race and gender in the United States. The central focus of the course is on employment differences by race and gender and the extent to which they arise from labor market discrimination versus other causes, although racial discrimination in housing is also considered. After a comprehensive overview of the structures of labor and housing markets and of nondiscriminatory reasons (that is, the cumulative effects of past discrimination and/or experiences) for the existence of group differentials in employment, wages, and residential locations, various theories of the sources of current discrimination are reviewed and evaluated. Actual governmental policies and alternative policies are evaluated in light of both the empirical evidence on group differences and the alternative theories of discrimination.This course is concerned with the structure, the causes and correlates, and the government policies to alleviate discrimination by race and gender in the United States. The central focus of the course is on employment differences by race and gender and the extent to which they arise from labor market discrimination versus other causes, although racial discrimination in housing.
                                      Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR
                                      AFRC 123-401 ADV WRITING FOR CHILDREN CARY, LORENE W 0200PM-0500PM Advanced Writing for Children is a response to our fast-and-faster learning culture. We ll take the term to write and re-write several fiction and non-fiction pieces for children or teens. Let s call it Slow Write, like the Slow Food movement. The idea is to take time to write better, deeper, more beautifully, funnier, to respect stories and how you choose and render them. Using community among ourselves and with select partners outside the university we will work to help you harness various intelligences to figure out the stories you need to write. Trips and collaborations will refresh and surprise. You ll be writing, but also taking time: to remember, sketch, connect with others, research, meditate, assess, develop, discard. Slow writing respects difference. Some of us need to get honest, others to pull back; some to learn fluency and others restraint. Most of us need support to work harder, but as Thomas Wolfe defined it for artists: an integrity of purpose, a spiritual intensity, and a fine expenditure of energy that most people have no conception of. When stories are ready, you will be invited to submit them to SafeKidsStories.com, because as Pippi Longstocking author Astrid Lungren has said: Children perform miracles when they read. On the side, for funsies, and to assuage the must-write fast urge, you will also write bits and blogs.
                                        AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE; CREATIVE WRITING
                                        AFRC 134-601 CREAT.NON-FICTION WRIT: Finding Voice: Perspectives on Race, Class & Gender WATTERSON, KATHRYN T 0530PM-0830PM SPRING 2018:As children, we first begin to learn stories and myths that explain how the world works, what life means, and how we re the same and different. In this writing seminar, we will explore myths about race, class, gender, and sexuality that are embedded in the culture of ordinary life, as well as in systems of power and privilege. We ll examine how inequalities impact not only our opportunities, but also how we perceive ourselves and others. During this semester, students will learn how other writers including Frederick Douglass, Audre Lorde, Leslie Marmo Silko, Thandeka, Angela Davis, James Baldwin, Jimmy Santiago Baco, and Amy Tan have used language to help them convey who they are and how their experiences have shaped them. Throughout the semester, we also will mine a deep understanding of the art of writing. In addition to in-class exercises, meditation and movement, students will be asked to a maintain a daily practice of free-writing; writing responses (2-3 pages weekly) to assigned books, essays, stories, and documentaries; participate in workshop discussions and peer review, and write and revise three stories/essays (4-5 pages).
                                          AFRC 135-601 LAW & SOCIETY FETNI, HOCINE T 0630PM-0930PM After introducing students to the major theoretical concepts concerning law and society, significant controversial societal issues that deal with law and the legal systems both domestically and internationally will be examined. Class discussions will focus on issues involving civil liberties, the organization of courts, legislatures, the legal profession and administrative agencies. Although the focus will be on law in the United States, law and society in other countries of Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America will be covered in a comparative context. Readings include research, reports, statutes and cases.
                                            CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                            AFRC 149-680 ELEMENTARY ZULU: ACCL MBEJE, AUDREY TR 0600PM-0900PM The Accelerated Elementary Zulu course is intensive, and can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on South Africa, Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicaive competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everydaylife situations to enable he students to communicae in predictable commom daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the ceiling of low intermediate level and floor of high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The low intermediate level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the third semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Intermediate Zulu I course materials.
                                              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                              AFRC 152-680 ELEMENTARY ZULU II MBEJE, AUDREY MW 0300PM-0500PM The Elementary Zulu II course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on South Africa, Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the ceiling of low intermediate level and floor of high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The low intermediate level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the third semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Intermediate Zulu I course materials.
                                                LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                AFRC 163-680 ELEMENTARY TWI II OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA TR 0430PM-0630PM Continuation of AFST 160.
                                                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                  AFRC 169-401 HISTORY OF AMERICAN LAW NATALINI, ROBERT TR 1030AM-1200PM This course covers the development of legal rules and principles concerning individual and group conduct in the United States since 1877. Such subjects as regulation and deregulation, legal education and the legal profession, and the legal status of women and minorities will be discussed.
                                                    CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                    AFRC 171-680 ELEMENTARY YORUBA II AWOYALE, YIWOLA MW 0500PM-0700PM The main objective of this course is to further sharpen the Yoruba linguistic knowledge that the student acquired in level I. By the end of the course, the student should be able to (1) read, write, and understand simple to moderately complex sentences in Yoruba; and, (2) advance in the knowledge of the Yoruba culure.
                                                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                      AFRC 177-401 AFRO AMER HIST 1876-PRES AKINS, JACQUELINE MW 1100AM-1230PM A study of the major events, issues, and personalities in Afro-American history from Reconstruction to the present. The course will also examine the different slave experiences and the methods of black resistance and rebellion in the various slave systems.
                                                        History & Tradition Sector (all classes) CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                        AFRC 181-680 ELEMENTARY SWAHILI II MSHOMBA, ELAINE TR 1200PM-0200PM This course continues to introduce basic grammar, vocabulary, and the reading and writing of Swahili to new speakers. During this term, folktales, other texts, and film selections are used to help introduce important aspects of Swahili culture and the use of the language in wide areas of Africa.
                                                          LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                          AFRC 187-301 The History of Women and Men of African Descent at the University of Penn PETERSON, BRIAN
                                                          HOWARD, CHARLES
                                                          M 1100AM-0200PM Topics Vary. See the Africana Studies Program's website at www.sas.upenn.edu/africana for a description of the current offerings. SPRING 2017: The history of the women and men of African Descent who have studied, taught, researched, and worked at the University of Pennsylvania provides a powerful window into the complex history of Blacks not only in America but throughout the Diaspora. This class will unpack, uncover, and present this history through close studies of texts and archived records on and at the university, as well as through first hand accounts by alumni and past and present faculty and staff members. These stories of the trials and triumphs of individuals on and around this campus demonstrate the amazing and absurd experience that Blacks have endured both at Penn and globally. Emphasis will be placed on the research process with the intent of creating a democratic classroom where all are students and all are instructors. Students will become familiar with archival historical research (and historical criticism) as well as with ethnographic research. Far more than just a survey of historical moments on campus and in the community, students will meet face to face with those who have lived and are presently living history and they will be faced with the challenge of discerning the most effective ways of documenting, protecting, and representing that history for future generations of Penn students.
                                                            CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                            AFRC 218-401 DIVERSITY & THE LAW ANDERSON, JOSE M 0300PM-0600PM The goal of this course is to study the role the law has played, and continues to play, in addressing the problems of racial discrimination in the United States. Contemporary issues such as racial profiling, affirmative action, and diversity will all be covered in their social and legal context. The basis for discussion will be assigned texts, articles, editorials and cases. In addition, interactive videos will also be used to aid class discussion. Course requirements will include a term paper and class presentations.
                                                              http://syllabi.wharton.upenn.edu/?term=2009A&course=AFRC218401
                                                              AFRC 222-601 AFR WOMEN LIVES PAST/PRE BLAKELY, PAMELA T 0430PM-0730PM Restoring women to African history is a worthy goal, but easier said than done.The course examines scholarship over the past forty years that brings to light previously overlooked contributions African women have made to political struggle, religious change, culture preservation, and economic development from pre-colonial times to present. The course addresses basic questions about changing women's roles and human rights controversies associated with African women within the wider cultural and historical contexts in which their lives are lived. It also raises fundamental questions about sources, methodology, and representation, including the value of African women's oral and written narrative and cinema production as avenues to insider perspectives on African women's lives.
                                                                AFRC 225-301 AFRICAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE MBEJE, AUDREY TR 0130PM-0300PM The aim of the course is to provide an overall perspective on African languages and linguistics. No background in linguistics is necessary. Students will be introduced to theoretical linguistics-its concepts, theories, ways of argumentation, data collection, data analysis, and data interpretation. The focus will be on the languages and linguistics of Africa to provide you with the knowledge and skills required to handle the language and language-related issues typical of African conditions. We will cover topics related to formal linguistics (phonology/phonetics, morphology, syntax, and semantics), aspects of pragmatics as well as the general socio-linguistic character of African countries. We will also cover language in context, language and culture, borrowing, multilingualism, and cross-cultural communication in Africa.
                                                                  AFRC 226-401 FAMILY FEUDS:BEYONCE, JAY-Z, AND SOLANGE AND THE MEANING OF AMERICAN MUSIC TILLET, SALAMISHAH TR 0300PM-0430PM Taking Beyonce's "Lemonade," Solange's "A Seat At The Table," and Jay-z's "4:44" as a point of departure, this class will focus on the role of popular music as "politics" within contemporary American culture. While these albums are clearly neither the first nor the only musical expressions to delve into the matters of black lives, feminism, and sexuality today, they do mark a very significant political and personal evolution for these individual artists and their audiences as they relate to the defining issues of our time. By looking at how each artist engages their influences (Nina Simone is staple for all three) and discussing how these albums challenge musical forms and incorporate different visual mediums, this course will reflect on the conversations these artists are having with each other and examine their cultural impact in order to understand the limits and possibilities of black musical expressions as sites of social change.
                                                                    AFRC 227-601 MEDIA IN AFRICA HASTY, MARY T 0600PM-0900PM
                                                                      AFRC 233-401 AFRICAN URBAN HISTORY DYER, ELIZABETH R 0300PM-0600PM SPRING 2018: African cities in the past contributed to dynamic and prosperous civilizations. What happened? This course examines Africans' aspirations of modernity through the lens of African urban history using fiction, film and current scholarship in several disciplines. Each class will explore two temporalities--the precolonial history of African cities, and the colonial and postcolonial histories of economic, social and political progress which goes by the name of development. Grounded in the case studies of both ancient and modern cities, this course explores the emergence and decline of trading centers, the rise of colonial cities, and the dilemmas of postcolonial economies and politics.
                                                                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                        AFRC 241-680 ELEMENTARY AMHARIC II HAILU, YOHANNES MW 0530PM-0730PM Continuation of Elementary Amharic I. Amharic belongs to the southern branch of Hemeto-Semitic languages, which is also referred to as "Afrasian." Amharic is the official language of Ethiopia and is spoken by 14 million native Amharas and by approximately 18 million of the other groups in Ethiopia. This course continues to introduce basic grammar, vocabulary, and the reading and writing of Amharic to new speakers.
                                                                          LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                          AFRC 243-680 INTERMEDIATE AMHARIC II HAILU, YOHANNES MW 0730PM-0900PM
                                                                            SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                            AFRC 251-680 INTERMEDIATE ZULU II MAGAYA, LINDIWE MW 0930AM-1100AM
                                                                              SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                              AFRC 265-680 INTERMEDIATE TWI II OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA TR 0630PM-0800PM
                                                                                SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                AFRC 271-680 INTERMEDIATE YORUBA II AWOYALE, YIWOLA TR 0500PM-0630PM
                                                                                  SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                  AFRC 276-401 LITERATURE AND ART IN AFRICA AND THE AFRICAN DIASPORA WOUBSHET, DAGMAWI TR 0900AM-1030AM This course will examine the lives of enslaved African Americans in the United States, both in the North and the South. We will engage historiographical debates, and tackle questions that have long concerned historians. For example, if slaves were wrenched from families and traded, could they sustain family relationships? If slaves worked from sun-up until sun-down, how could they create music? We will engage with primary and secondary sources to expand our understandings of values, cultural practices, and daily life among enslaved people. Topics will include: literacy, family, labor, food, music and dance, hair and clothing, religion, material culture, resistance, and memories of slavery. Several disciplines including History, Archaeology, Literature, and Music, will help us in our explorations. Written, oral, and artistic texts for the course will provide us with rich sources for exploring the nuances of slave life, and students will have opportunities to delve deeply into topics that are of particular interest to them.
                                                                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                    AFRC 281-402 TPCS AFRICAN-AMER LIT: 21ST-CENTURY AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE CRAWFORD, MARGO MW 0200PM-0330PM In this advanced seminar, students will be introduced to a variety of approaches to African American literatures, and to a wide spectrum of methodologies and ideological postures (for example, The Black Arts Movement). The course will present an assortment of emphases, some of them focused on geography (for example, the Harlem Renaissance), others focused on genre (autobiography, poetry or drama), the politics of gender and class, or a particular grouping of authors. Previous versions of this course have included "African American Autobigraphy," "Backgrounds of African American Literature," "The Black Narrative" (beginning with eighteenth century slave narratives and working toward contemporary literature), as well as seminars on urban spaces, jazz, migration, oral narratives, black Christianity, and African-American music. See Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.
                                                                                      CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                                      AFRC 282-680 INTERMEDIATE SWAHILI II MSHOMBA, ELAINE TR 1030AM-1200PM At the end of the course students will be at Level 2 on the ILR (Interagency Language Roundtable) scale.
                                                                                        SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                        AFRC 285-680 ADVANCED SWAHILI II MSHOMBA, ELAINE TR 0900AM-1030AM The objectives are to continue to strengthen students' knowledge of speaking, listening, reading, and writing Swahili and to compare it with the language of the students; to continue learning about the cultures of East Africa and to continue making comparisons with the culture(s) of the students; to continue to consider the relationship between that knowledge and the knowledge of other disciplines; and using that knowledge, to continue to unite students with communities outside of class. Level 3 on the ILR (Interagency Language Roundtable) scale.
                                                                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                          AFRC 286-401 NO BENCH BY THE ROAD: MONUMENTS, MEMORY AND THE AFTERLIFE OF SLAVERY TILLET, SALAMISHAH R 0430PM-0730PM SPRING 2018: In 1989, as she reflected on her magnum opus, Beloved, Toni Morrison declared "There is no place you or I can go, to think about or not think about, to summon the presences of,or recollect the absences of slaves. She went on, There is no suitable memorial, or plaque, or wreath, or wall, or park, or skyscraper lobby. There's no 300-foot tower, there's no bench by the road." And because such a place doesn't exist...the book had to." Today, there are significantly more markers of slavery in the public sphere as well as new novels, films, and television shows that directly take up the history and remnants of slavery in our lives. Looking at Colson Whitehead's novel, The Underground Railroad and WGN's tv series "The Underground," the remaking of the Whitney Plantation in Louisiana as well as considering the debates about confederate flags and monuments in places like New Orleans, Virginia, and South Carolina, this course will examine the meaning and movements behind these contemporary engagements with American slavery today. See the Africana Studies Program's website at www.sas.upenn.edu/africana for a description of the current offerings.
                                                                                            AFRC 294-601 FACING AMERICA SPERLING, JULIET M 0500PM-0800PM This course explores the visual history of race in the United States as both self-fashioning and cultural mythology by examing the ways that conceptions of Native American, Latino,and Asian identity, alongside ideas of Blackness and Whiteness, have combined to create the various cultural ideologies of class, gender, and sexuality that remain evident in historical visual and material culture. We will also investigate the ways that these creations have subsequently helped to launch new visual entertainments, inclduing museum spectacles, blackface minstrelsy, and early film, from the colonial period through the 1940s.
                                                                                              CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                                              AFRC 307-401 RACE, SCIENCE & JUSTICE ROBERTS, DOROTHY MW 0400PM-0500PM This course draws on an interdisciplinary body of biological and social scientific literature to explore critically the connections between race, science, and justice in the United States, including scientific theories of racial inequality, from the eighteenth century to the genomic age. After investigating varying concepts of race, as well as their uses in eugenics, criminology, anthropology, sociology, neuroscience, and medicine, we will focus on the recent expansion of genomic research and technologies that treat race as a biological category that can be identified at the molecular level, including race-specific pharmaceuticals, commercial ancestry testing, and racial profiling with DNA forensics. We will discuss the significance of scientific investigations of racial difference for advancing racial justice in the United States.
                                                                                                SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                                AFRC 312-401 MUSLIMS, CHRISTIANS & JEWS: HISTORY & MEMORY IN SPAIN BUTLER, ANTHEA W 0200PM-0500PM Al- Andalus, the Muslim Kingdom of Spain, is the point of departure for this Penn Global Course which looks at the history, religion, and memories of the Andalusian Peninsula in Spain. The purpose of this course is to investigate the interreligious lives of Muslims, Christians, and Jews during what is called the Convivencia, or La Convivencia. This time refers to a time when Muslims, Christians and Jews lived in peace before the Reconquista, or reconquest of Spain by Catholics in 1492. Our task is to not only understand this history, but to understand how convivencia is a problematic,but useful term in understanding this time period of great cultural growth,building, and religious innovation.
                                                                                                  AFRC 321-301 UNDERSTANDING AFRICAN CONFLICT ALI-DINAR, ALI TR 0300PM-0430PM The end of colonial rule was the springboard for the start of cold wars in various regions of Africa. Where peace could not be maintained violence erupted. Even where secession has been attained, as in the new country of South Sudan, the threat of civil war lingers. While domestic politics have led to the rise of armed conflicts and civil wars in many African countries, the external factors should also not be ignored. Important in all current conflicts is the concern to international peace and security. Overall this course will: (1) investigate the general nature of armed conflicts in Africa (2) provide in-depth analysis of the underlying factors (3) and discuss the regional and the international responses to these conflicts and their implications. Special emphasis will be placed upon African conflicts and civil wars in: great Lakes area, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Sudan, Somalia, South Sudan, and Uganda.
                                                                                                    AFRC 328-401 CONFLCT GEOGRAPHIES IN AFRICA (& PHILA):SPACES OF WAR, MEMORY & RESISTANCE WENDEL, DELIA M 0200PM-0500PM This course will primarily consider case studies in Africa with a view to drawing comparisons with conflict geographies here at home (in Philadelphia or where you consider home to be). Conflicts on the African continent are some of the least well understood by lay publics; often characterized as the result of pre-modern tribalism and a naturalized consequence of state dysfunction or resource scarcity. In this course, we will demystify the notion that war is inevitable or that some cultures are naturally prone to conflict. We will do so by examining some of the underlying challenges to consensus and peace in cities and countries in Africa, drawing connection to conditions, both historic and contemporary, that exist closer to home. After all-and as recent conflict conflict geographies such as the Dakota Access Pipeline, Charlottesville Rally, and Women's March remind us-spaces and communities in in the United States are rife with struggle and contestation. Throughout the semester, we will ask: How do individuals experience conflict? What roles do spaces have in structuring oppression, activating conflicts, resisting power, and building peace? How is the study of conflict-understood as both routine contestation and violent confrontation-informed by research on built and natural environments? This is a course that will require the active participation of every individual-in completing all readings, preparing questions and comments, and debating issues with respect and openness. There are no other prerequisites for this course, nor preferred disciplinary concentrations. We will draw from our collective experiences (academic and and personal) to discuss research in diverse fields, including Anthropology, Conflict and Peace Studies, Geography, Political Ecology, and Urban Studies.
                                                                                                      AFRC 332-401 N.AFRICA:HIST,CULTR,SOC SHARKEY, HEATHER T 0130PM-0430PM This interdisciplinary seminar aims to introduce students to the countries of North Africa, with a focus on the Maghreb and Libya (1830-present). It does so while examining the region's close economic and cultural connections to sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and the Middle East. Readings will include histories, political analysis, anthropological studies, and novels, and will cover a wide range of topics such as colonial and postcolonial experiences, developments in Islamic thought and practice, and labor migration. This class is intended for juniors, seniors, and graduate students.
                                                                                                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                        AFRC 351-680 ADVANCED ZULU II MAGAYA, LINDIWE MW 1130AM-0100PM
                                                                                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                          AFRC 364-680 ADVANCED TWI II OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA TBA TBA-
                                                                                                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                            AFRC 373-401 THE HISTORY OF FOREIGN AID IN AFRICA CASSANELLI, LEE MW 0330PM-0500PM This course examines the history, politics, and significance of foreign aid to Africa since the late 19th century. While we do not typically think about the European colonial period in Africa in terms of 'foreign aid,' that era introduced ideas and institutions which formed the foundations for modern aid policies and practices. So we start there and move forward into more contemporary times. In addition to examining the objectives behind foreign assistance and the intentions of donors and recipients, we will look at some of the consequences (intended or unintended) of various forms of foreign aid to Africa over the past century. While not designed to be a comprehensive history of development theory, of African economics, or of international aid organizations, the course will touch on all of these topics. Previous coursework on Africa is strongly advised.
                                                                                                              AFRC 405-401 RELIGION, SOCIAL JUSTICE & URBAN DEVELOPMENT LAMAS, ANDREW M 0500PM-0800PM Urban development has been influenced by religious conceptions of social and economic justice. Progressive traditions within Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, Baha'i, Humanism and other religions and systems of moral thought have yielded powerful critiques of oppression and hierarchy as well as alternative economic frameworks for ownership, governance, production, labor, and community. Historical and contemporary case studies from the Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East will be considered, as we examine the ways in which religious responses to poverty, inequality, and ecological destruction have generated new forms of resistance and development.
                                                                                                                AFRC 420-601 The US and Human Rights: Policies and Practices FETNI, HOCINE R 0630PM-0930PM Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's course list at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offering. Fall 2017:After an examination of the philosophical, legal, and political perspectives on Human Rights, this course will focus on US policies and practices relevant to Human Rights. Toward that end, emphasis will be placed on both the domestic and the international aspects of Human Rights as reflected in US policies and practices. Domestically, the course will discuss (1) the process of incorporating the International Bill of Human Rights into the American legal system and (2) the US position on and practices regarding the political, civil, economic, social, and cultural rights of minorities and various other groups within the US. Internationally, the course will examine US Human Rights policies toward Africa. Specific cases of Rwanda, Kenya, South Africa and Egypt, as well as other cases from the continent, will be presented in the assessment of US successes and failures in the pursuit of its Human Rights strategy in Africa. Readings will include research papers, reports, statutes, treaties, and cases.
                                                                                                                  AFRC 448-601 NEIGHBORHOOD DISPLACEMENT & COMMUNITY POWER PALMER, WALTER W 0600PM-0900PM This course uses the history of black displacement to examine community power and advocacy. It examines the methods of advocacy (e.g. case, class, and legislative) and political action through which community activists can influence social policy development and community and institutional change. The course also analyzes selected strategies and tactics of change and seeks to develop alternative roles in the group advocacy, lobbying, public education and public relations, electoral politics, coalition building, and legal and ethical dilemmas in political action. Case studies of neighborhood displacement serve as central means of examing course topics.
                                                                                                                    CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                                                                    AFRC 491-681 AFRC LANG TUTOR: ELEM II: IGBO-AFR LANG ELEM II NWADIORA, CHIKA TR 0500PM-0700PM Continuation of AFST 490.
                                                                                                                      PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                      AFRC 491-682 AFRC LANG TUTOR: ELEM II: WOLOF-AFR LANG ELEM II THIOUNE, MBACKE MW 0500PM-0700PM Continuation of AFST 490.
                                                                                                                        LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                        AFRC 491-683 AFRC LANG TUTOR: ELEM II: TIGRINYA - ELEM II ZEMICHAEL, ERMIAS TR 0500PM-0700PM Continuation of AFST 490.
                                                                                                                          LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                          AFRC 491-686 AFRC LANG TUTOR: ELEM II TR 0630PM-0830PM Continuation of AFST 490.
                                                                                                                            LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                            AFRC 493-681 AFR LANG TUTOR:INTERM II: IGBO-AFR LANG INTER II NWADIORA, CHIKA TR 0700PM-0830PM Continuation of AFST 492
                                                                                                                              SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                              AFRC 493-682 AFR LANG TUTOR:INTERM II: WOLOF-AFR LANG INTER II THIOUNE, MBACKE MW 0500PM-0630PM Continuation of AFST 492
                                                                                                                                SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                AFRC 493-683 AFR LANG TUTOR:INTERM II: TIGRINYA - INTER II ZEMICHAEL, ERMIAS TR 0700PM-0830PM Continuation of AFST 492
                                                                                                                                  SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                  AFRC 493-686 AFR LANG TUTOR:INTERM II: MALAGASY - INTER II ALDOUS, TRAVIS MW 0700PM-0900PM Continuation of AFST 492
                                                                                                                                    SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                    AFRC 495-681 AFR LANG TUTOR: ADV II: IGBO - AFR LANG ADV II NWADIORA, CHIKA TR 0700PM-0900PM Continuation of AFST 494.
                                                                                                                                      AFRC 495-682 AFR LANG TUTOR: ADV II: WOLOF - AFR LANG ADV II THIOUNE, MBACKE TR 0500PM-0700PM Continuation of AFST 494.
                                                                                                                                        LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                        AFRC 495-683 AFR LANG TUTOR: ADV II: TIGRINYA-AFR LANG ADV II ZEMICHAEL, ERMIAS MW 0500PM-0700PM Continuation of AFST 494.
                                                                                                                                          AFRC 495-686 AFR LANG TUTOR: ADV II TBA TBA- Continuation of AFST 494.
                                                                                                                                            AFRC 497-681 LANGUAGE & CULTURE II: IGBO LANG & CULTURE II NWADIORA, CHIKA CANCELED Continuation of AFST 496
                                                                                                                                              AFRC 504-601 MEDIA IN AFRICA HASTY, MARY T 0600PM-0900PM
                                                                                                                                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                AFRC 509-401 READING HISTORICAL ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS ALI-DINAR, ALI W 0300PM-0600PM Arabic language is used by many societies not only in communication but also in correspondence and in documenting the affairs of their daily lives. Arabic script is adopted by many groups whose native languages are not Arabic, in writing their languages before some moved to the Roman alphabet. In many historical documents specific style of writing and handwriting are dominant. This specificity is influenced by the dialectical variations, the historical development of each region and the level of Arabic literacy and use. The aims of this course which will focus on the Arabic writing tradition of Africa and the Middle East are as follows: (1) Reading and interpreting hand-written Arabic documents from Africa and the Middle East with focus on different historical eras. (2) In-depth understanding of the historical and language contexts of the selected documents. (3) Examining different handwriting styles that are in vogue in Africa and the Middle East.
                                                                                                                                                  AFRC 517-680 ELEMENTARY YORUBA II AWOYALE, YIWOLA MW 0500PM-0700PM The main objective of this course is to further sharpen the Yoruba linquistic knowledge that the student acquired in level I. By the end of the course, the student should be able to (1) read, write, and understand simple to moderately complex sentences in Yoruba; and (2) advance in the knowledge of the Yoruba culture.
                                                                                                                                                    LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                    AFRC 522-401 PSYCH OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN: IMPLICATIONS FOR COUNSELING & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT STEVENSON, HOWARD T 1200PM-0200PM Using the Afro-centric philosophical understanding of the world, this course will focus on psychological issues related to African Americans, including the history of African American psychology, its application across the life span, and contemporary community issues.
                                                                                                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                      AFRC 528-401 CONFLCT GEOGRAPHIES IN AFRICA (& PHILA):SPACES OF WAR, MEMORY & RESISTANCE WENDEL, DELIA M 0200PM-0500PM This course is cross-listed with SWRK 528 (Advanced Topics) when the subject matter is related to African, African American, or other African Diaspora issues. Recent topics include, "Religion, Youth and Popular Culture" and "Anxious Identities." See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.
                                                                                                                                                        AFRC 533-401 SOCIOLOGY OF RACE ARMENTA, AMADA R 0130PM-0430PM This course is cross-listed when the subject matter is related to African, African American, or other African Diaspora issues. Courses recently offered are, "Political Culture and American Cities, Social Movements and Social Change, Critical Race Theory. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. This course brings together the vantage points of urban political economy, history and urban anthropology. Readings and discussions will cross those literatures, folding in considerations of race, ethnicity and gender in the American city life, with a focus on the relation between culture and political economy. We will reconstruct the history of the different tracks of urban studies in the U.S., beginning with its roots in sociology and anthropology in the Chicago School and in political science in reform-oriented studies of public administration. We will revisit the community power debate of the 1950s-1970s, which shook out significantly along disciplinary lines, and will examine the development of the urban political economy perspective in the 1980s and 1990s, as well as developments within U.S. urban anthropology since the 1960s. We will employ local case study materials, and at every point we will try to understand the intellectual trajectories of the urbanist discourses in relation to dynamics contemporaneously shaping urban politics and policy. Course requirements are seminar preparation which includes each student's leading discussion around specified reading assignments -- and a research paper, the topic of which must be approved by week 5.
                                                                                                                                                          AFRC 534-680 INTERMEDIATE YORUBA II AWOYALE, YIWOLA TR 0500PM-0630PM
                                                                                                                                                            SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                            AFRC 536-401 Race, Class, and Money: Economic Inequality in American Pol. Development GOTTSCHALK, MARIE T 0130PM-0430PM This graduate-level seminar surveys the relationship between race, class, and corporate and financial interests at key junctures in American political development, including the founding, the "Age of the Common Man," ," the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Gilded Age, the Progressive era, the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, the Great Society, and today's era of neoliberalism, the "dark state," and Trumpism. It will have a particular institutional focus on the presidency. This course is open to undergraduates with the permission of the professor.
                                                                                                                                                              AFRC 538-401 TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL ART: MIGRATING MATERIALITY: IVORY AROUND THE MEDITERRANEAN GUERIN, SARAH T 0300PM-0600PM The craft of ivory carving around the Mediterranean is contingent upon the availability of imported elephant tusks, from either South East Asia or, more frequently, from the African continent. The shifting winds of trade routes offer an interpretive paradigm with which to analyze ivory objects from a variety of different cultural groups: the lack or abundance of ivory and the resulting desire for or surfeit of the material shapes its meaning and use around the Mediterranean basin. The study of ivory objects as they migrate around the Mediterranean allows us to investigate the rich intercultural interactions between Eastern and Western Christians, and both of these with the Islamic world. This course focuses on an object oriented knowledge of ivory artefacts, with a strong emphasis on the collections at the PennMuseum, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and other area collections.
                                                                                                                                                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                                AFRC 541-680 ELEMENTARY AMHARIC II HAILU, YOHANNES MW 0530PM-0730PM Continuation of Elementary Amharic I.
                                                                                                                                                                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                  AFRC 544-680 INTERMEDIATE AMHARIC II HAILU, YOHANNES MW 0730PM-0900PM Offered through the Penn Language Center
                                                                                                                                                                    SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                    AFRC 549-680 ELEMENTARY ZULU: ACCL MBEJE, AUDREY TR 0600PM-0900PM The Accelerated Elementary Zulu course is intensive, and can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on South Africa, Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, and writing skills at the ceiling of low intermediate level and floor of high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The low intermediate level proficience skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the third semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Intermediate Zulu I course materials.
                                                                                                                                                                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                      AFRC 570-401 SONGS OF DISSENT: READING AFRICAN AMERICAN POETRY IN THE 21ST CENTURY BEAVERS, HERMAN M 0300PM-0600PM Spring 2018: The aim of this seminar can be described as trying to figure out how poetry and poetics figure into the effort to theorize the African American subject in the 21st Century. At a time when the sheer number of African American poets publishing today (to say nothing of the major prizes they are winning) has exploded exponentially, why does poetry continue to be so marginalin African American literary and cultural studies? As we make our way through recently published anthologies of African American poetry, then turn to works of individual poets, we will consider issues of influence,intertextual periodization, stylization, and tradition as they impact approaches to form, structure, and craft. Ultimately, however, we will focus on the question of why are these poets writing these poems at this particular time? Technologies like PennSound and You Tube will provide time? Technologies like PennSound and You Tube will provide important critical tools in our endeavors and at various points during the term, guest lecturers will join our discussions.
                                                                                                                                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                                        AFRC 587-401 RACE, NATION, EMPIRE THOMAS, DEBORAH T 0200PM-0500PM This graduate seminar examines the dynamic relationships among empires, nations and states; colonial and post-colonial policies; and anti-colonial strategies within a changing global context. Using the rubrics of anthropology, history, cultural studies, and social theory, we will explore the intimacies of subject formation within imperial contexts- past and present- especially in relation to ideas about race and belonging. We will focus on how belonging and participation have been defined in particular locales, as well as how these notions have been socialized through a variety of institutional contexts. Finally, we will consider the relationships between popular culture and state formation, examining these as dialectical struggles for hegemony.
                                                                                                                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                                          AFRC 601-401 COLORISM AND AFRICAN AMERICANS (HD) ABIOLA, UFUOMA R 0500PM-0700PM This course critically examines colorism as it relates to African Americans and the evolving meanings conected to this phenomenon. Colorism is the discrimination based on gradations of skin color and is related to and distinct from racism. Colorism typically privileges lighter-skinned individuals and penalizes darker-skinned individuals within and across racial and ethnic groups. Four broad themes will guide this course; 1) the history and development of colorism; 2) the psychology and politics of colorism; 3) gender and colorism; and 4) colorism and the media.
                                                                                                                                                                            AFRC 605-401 ANTHROPOLOGY OF MUSIC ROMMEN, TIMOTHY M 0200PM-0500PM Topics may include the intellectual history of ethnomusicology, current readings in ethnomusicology, a consideration of theoretical principles based upon the reading and interpretation of selected monographs, and area studies. Please see department website for current course term description.
                                                                                                                                                                              AFRC 610-401 TOPICS IN AMERICAN HIST: RACE RELATIONS 1865-PRES BAY, MIA T 0130PM-0430PM This course is cross-listed with HIST 610 (Colloquium in American History) when the subject matter is related to African, African American, or other African Diaspora issues. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edufor a description of the current offerings.
                                                                                                                                                                                AFRC 632-401 N.AFRICA:HIST,CULT,SOC SHARKEY, HEATHER T 0130PM-0430PM This interdisciplinary seminar aims to introduce students to the countries of North Africa, with a focus on the Maghreb and Libya (1830-present). It does so while examining the region's close economic and cultural connections to sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and the Middle East. Readings will include histories, political analyses, anthropological studies, and novels, and will cover a wide range of topics such as colonial and postcolonial experiences, developments in Islamic thought and practice, and labor migration. This class is intended for juniors, seniors, and graduate students.
                                                                                                                                                                                  CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                                                                                                  AFRC 640-301 PROSEMINAR AFRICANA STDS JOHNSON, GRACE W 0200PM-0500PM This course focuses on the historical and cultural relationship between Africans and their descendants abroad.
                                                                                                                                                                                    AFRC 720-301 DISSERTATION DESIGN WILLIAMS, HEATHER R 0200PM-0500PM This course is intended to help students to write a strong dissertation proposal/prospectus. A proposal is a detailed plan for a long journey of of conceptualization, research, and writing that will lead to the first major, independent scholarly contribution. Students will work closely with advisors, peers, and the professor in the course, to develop the questions, methodological approaches, and theoretical perspectives that will guide their research and writing. At the end of the semester, each student will have completed a proposal, and will be ready to defend it.
                                                                                                                                                                                      AFST 140-680 ELEMENT ZULU I RESIDENCE MBEJE, AUDREY M 0700PM-0830PM This elementary course is for beginners and it requires no prior knowledge of Zulu. The course will expose students to the Zulu language and culture and will be based in the National Standards for Foreign Language Learning. Students will be engaged in communicative language learning through interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of language learning techniques. They will gain knowledge and understanding of the Zulu culture. They will use their Zulu language and culture learning experience to connect with other disciplines and further their knowledge of these disciplines through perspectives acquired from their Zulu class. They will also develop insight into the nature of language and culture through comparisons of the Zulu language and culture and their own. Through movies, songs, and other cultural activities online students will acquire the natural use of the language which will enable them to acquire linguistic and cultural skill to become life-long learners who can participate in Zulu communities in the U.S. and overseas.
                                                                                                                                                                                        LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                        AFST 149-680 ELEMENTARY ZULU: ACCL MBEJE, AUDREY TR 0600PM-0900PM The Accelerated Elementary Zulu course is intensive, and can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research onSouth Africa,Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the ceiling of low intermediate level and floor of high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The low intermediate level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the third semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Intermediate Zulu I course materials.
                                                                                                                                                                                          LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                          AFST 151-680 ELEMENTARY ZULU II MBEJE, AUDREY MW 0300PM-0500PM The Elementary Zulu II course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on South Africa, Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the ceiling of low intermediate level and floor of high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The low intermediate level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the third semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Intermediate Zulu I course materials.
                                                                                                                                                                                            LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                            AFST 161-680 ELEMENTARY TWI II OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA TR 0430PM-0630PM
                                                                                                                                                                                              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                              AFST 171-680 ELEMENTARY YORUBA II AWOYALE, YIWOLA MW 0500PM-0700PM The main objective of this course is to further sharpen the Yoruba linquistic knowledge that the student acquired in level I. By the end of the course, the student should be able to (1) read, write, and understand simple to moderately complex sentences in Yoruba; and, (2) advance in the knowledge of the Yoruba culture.
                                                                                                                                                                                                LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                AFST 181-680 ELEMENTARY SWAHILI II MSHOMBA, ELAINE TR 1200PM-0200PM This course continues to introduce basic grammar, vocabulary, and the reading and writing of Swahili to new speakers. During this term, folktales, other texts, and film selections are used to help introduce important aspects of Swahili culture and the use of the language in wide areas of Africa.
                                                                                                                                                                                                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                  AFST 221-601 AFR WOMEN LIVES PAST/PRE BLAKELY, PAMELA T 0430PM-0730PM Restoring women to African history is a worthy goal, but easier said than done.The course examines scholarship over the past forty years that brings to light previously overlooked contributions African women have made to political struggle, religious change, culture preservation, and economic development from pre-colonial times to present. The course addresses basic questions about changing women's roles and human rights controversies associated with African women within the wider cultural and historical contexts in which their lives are lived. It also raises fundamental questions about sources, methodology, and representation, including the value of African women's oral and written narrative and cinema production as avenues to insider perspectives on African women's lives.
                                                                                                                                                                                                    AFST 241-680 ELEMENTARY AMHARIC II HAILU, YOHANNES MW 0530PM-0730PM Continuation of Elementary Amharic I. Amharic belongs to the southern branch of Hemeto-Semitic languages, which is also referred to as "Afrasian." Amharic is the official language of Ethiopia and is spoken by 14 million native Amharas and by approximately 18 million of the other groups in Ethiopia. This course continues to introduce basic grammar, vocabulary, and the reading and writing of Amharic to new speakers.
                                                                                                                                                                                                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                      AFST 243-680 INTERMEDIATE AMHARIC II HAILU, YOHANNES MW 0730PM-0900PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                        SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                        AFST 247-680 ADVANCED AMHARIC: ADVANCED AMHARIC PART II TR 0700PM-0830PM An advanced Amharic course that will further sharpen the students' knowledge of the Amharic language and the culture of the Amharas. The learners communicative skills will be further developed through listening, speaking, reading and writing. There will also be discussions on cultural and political issues.
                                                                                                                                                                                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                          AFST 251-680 INTERMEDIATE ZULU II MAGAYA, LINDIWE MW 0930AM-1100AM
                                                                                                                                                                                                            SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                            AFST 263-680 INTERMEDIATE TWI II OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA TR 0630PM-0800PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                              SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                              AFST 271-680 INTERMEDIATE YORUBA II AWOYALE, YIWOLA TR 0500PM-0630PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                AFST 281-680 INTERMEDIATE SWAHILI II MSHOMBA, ELAINE TR 1030AM-1200PM At the end of the course students will be at Level 2 on the ILR (Interagency Language Roundtable) scale.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  AFST 285-680 ADVANCED SWAHILI II MSHOMBA, ELAINE TR 0900AM-1030AM The objectives are to continue to strengthen students' knowledge of speaking, listening, reading, and writing Swahili and to compare it with the language of the students; to continue learning about the cultures of East Africa and to continue making comparisons with the culture(s) of the students; to continue to consider the relationship between that knowledge and the knowledge of other disciplines; and using that knowledge, to continue to unite students with communities outside of class. Level 3 on the ILR (Interagency Language Roundtable) scale.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    AFST 298-301 BLENDS OF CULTURES: CONFLICT & COOPERATION IN MOROCCO & ZANZIBAR WEITZBERG, KEREN
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    MILI, AMEL
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    MW 0300PM-0430PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                      AFST 351-680 ADVANCED ZULU II MAGAYA, LINDIWE MW 1130AM-0100PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                        AFST 363-680 ADVANCED TWI II OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA TBA TBA-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          AFST 371-680 ADVANCED YORUBA II AWOYALE, YIWOLA TR 0700PM-0900PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                            AFST 485-680 SWAHILI LANG/CULTURE II MSHOMBA, ELAINE TBA TBA- Continuation of Swahili Language & Culture I. Course is taught in Swahili and focuses on reading/writing skills and speaking/listening skills, as well as structural and cultural information. The course is structured around three thematic units: History, Politics, and Education.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                              CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                              AFST 487-680 YORUBA LANG & CULTURE II AWOYALE, YIWOLA TBA TBA-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                AFST 491-680 MALAGASY-AFR LG ELEM II ALDOUS, TRAVIS TR 0700PM-0900PM Continuation of AFST 490.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  AFST 491-681 AFRC LANG TUTOR: ELEM II: IGBO-AFR LANG ELEM II NWADIORA, CHIKA TR 0500PM-0700PM Continuation of AFST 490.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    AFST 491-682 AFRC LANG TUTOR: ELEM II: WOLOF-AFR LANG ELEM II THIOUNE, MBACKE MW 0500PM-0700PM Continuation of AFST 490.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      AFST 491-683 AFRC LANG TUTOR: ELEM II: TIGRINYA - ELEM II ZEMICHAEL, ERMIAS TR 0500PM-0700PM Continuation of AFST 490.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        AFST 491-684 MALAGASY-AFR LG ELEM II ALDOUS, TRAVIS TR 0500PM-0700PM Continuation of AFST 490.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          AFST 491-686 AFRC LANG TUTOR: ELEM II TR 0630PM-0830PM Continuation of AFST 490.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            AFST 491-687 MANDING-ELEM II DONALDSON, COLEMAN MW 0500PM-0700PM Continuation of AFST 490.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              AFST 491-688 CHICHEWA-AFR LAN ELEM II MWAYA, MONDA TR 0630PM-0830PM Continuation of AFST 490.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                AFST 493-680 MALAGASY - INTER II ALDOUS, TRAVIS MW 0500PM-0700PM Continuation of AFST 492.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  AFST 493-681 AFR LANG TUTOR:INTERM II: IGBO-AFR LANG INTER II NWADIORA, CHIKA TR 0700PM-0830PM Continuation of AFST 492.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    AFST 493-682 AFR LANG TUTOR:INTERM II: WOLOF-AFR LANG INTER II THIOUNE, MBACKE MW 0500PM-0630PM Continuation of AFST 492.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      AFST 493-683 AFR LANG TUTOR:INTERM II: TIGRINYA - INTER II ZEMICHAEL, ERMIAS TR 0700PM-0830PM Continuation of AFST 492.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        AFST 493-686 AFR LANG TUTOR:INTERM II: MALAGASY - INTER II ALDOUS, TRAVIS MW 0700PM-0900PM Continuation of AFST 492.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          AFST 493-687 AFR LANG TUTOR:INTERM II TBA TBA- Continuation of AFST 492.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            AFST 493-688 CHICHEWA - INTER II MWAYA, MONDA MW 0600PM-0730PM Continuation of AFST 492.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              AFST 495-680 AFR LANG TUTOR: ADV II TBA TBA- Continuation of AFST 494.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                AFST 495-681 AFR LANG TUTOR: ADV II: IGBO - AFR LANG ADV II NWADIORA, CHIKA TR 0700PM-0900PM Continuation of AFST 494.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  AFST 495-682 AFR LANG TUTOR: ADV II: WOLOF - AFR LANG ADV II THIOUNE, MBACKE TR 0500PM-0700PM Continuation of AFST 494.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    AFST 495-683 AFR LANG TUTOR: ADV II: TIGRINYA-AFR LANG ADV II ZEMICHAEL, ERMIAS MW 0500PM-0700PM Continuation of AFST 494.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      PENN LANGUAGE CENTER PERMISSION NEEDED
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      AFST 495-686 AFR LANG TUTOR: ADV II TBA TBA- Continuation of AFST 494.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        AFST 495-687 AFR LANG TUTOR: ADV II: AFR LANG TUTOR: ADV II CANCELED Continuation of AFST 494.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          AFST 495-688 AFR LANG TUTOR: ADV II TBA TBA- Continuation of AFST 494.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            AFST 497-680 TWI LANG AND CULTURE OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA TBA TBA- Continuation of AFST 496.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              AFST 497-681 LANGUAGE & CULTURE II: IGBO LANG & CULTURE II NWADIORA, CHIKA CANCELED Continuation of AFST 496.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                AFST 509-680 Arabic: Reading Historical Manuscripts ALI-DINAR, ALI CANCELED Arabic language is used by many societies not only in communication but also in correspondence and in documenting the affairs of their daily lives. Arabic script is adopted by many groups who native languages are not Arabic, in writing their language before some moved to the roman alphabet. In many historical documents specific style of writing and handwriting are dominant. This specificity is influenced by the dialectical variations, the historical development of each region and the level of Arabic literacy and use.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  AFST 518-680 ELEMENTARY YORUBA II AWOYALE, YIWOLA MW 0500PM-0700PM The main objective of this course is to further sharpen the Yoruba linquistic knowledge that the student acquired in level I. By the end of the course, the student should be able to (1) read, write, and understand simple to moderately complex sentences in Yoruba; and (2) advance in the knowledge of the Yoruba culture.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    AFST 532-680 INTERMEDIATE YORUBA II AWOYALE, YIWOLA TR 0500PM-0630PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      AFST 541-680 ELEMENTARY AMHARIC II HAILU, YOHANNES MW 0530PM-0730PM Continuation of Elementary Amharic I.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        AFST 544-680 INTERMEDIATE AMHARIC II HAILU, YOHANNES MW 0730PM-0900PM Offered through Penn Language Center
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          AFST 547-680 ADVANCED AMHARIC: ADVANCED AMHARIC PART II TR 0700PM-0830PM An advanced Amharic course that will further sharpen the students' knowledge of the Amharic language and the culture of the Amharas. The learners communicative skills will be further developed through listening, speaking, reading and wwriting. There will also be discussions on cultural and political issues.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            AFST 549-680 ELEMENTARY ZULU: ACCL MBEJE, AUDREY TR 0600PM-0900PM The Accelerated Elementary Zulu course is intensive, and can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research onSouth Africa,Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the ceiling of low intermediate level and floor of high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The low intermediate level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the third semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Intermediate Zulu I course materials.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              AFST 551-680 ELEMENTARY ZULU II MBEJE, AUDREY MW 0300PM-0500PM The Elementary Zulu II course can be taken to fulfill a language requirement, or for linguistic preparation to do research on South Africa, Southern Africa/Africa-related topics. The course emphasizes communicative competence to enable the students to acquire linguistic and extra-linguistic skills in Zulu. The content of the course is selected from various everyday life situations to enable the students to communicate in predictable common daily settings. Culture, as it relates to language use, is also part of the course content. Students will acquire the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at the ceiling of low intermediate level and floor of high novice level, based on the ACTFL scale. The low intermediate level proficiency skills that the students will acquire constitute threshold capabilities of the third semester range of proficiency to prepare students for Intermediate Zulu I course materials.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                AFST 553-680 INTERMEDIATE ZULU II MAGAYA, LINDIWE MW 0930AM-1100AM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  AFST 555-680 ADVANCED ZULU II MAGAYA, LINDIWE MW 1130AM-0100PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    AFST 559-680 SUDANESE ARABIC II ALI-DINAR, ALI TBA TBA-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      AFST 565-680 ELEMENTARY TWI II OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA TR 0430PM-0630PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        AFST 567-680 INTERMEDIATE TWI II OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA TR 0630PM-0800PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          AFST 569-680 ADVANCED TWI II OFOSU-DONKOH, KOBINA TBA TBA-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            AFST 581-680 ELEMENTARY SWAHILI II MSHOMBA, ELAINE TR 1200PM-0200PM This course continues to introduce basic grammar, vocabulary, and the reading and writing of Swahili to new speakers. During this term, folktales, other texts, and film selections are used to help introduce important aspects of Swahili culture and the use of the language in wide areas of Africa.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              AFST 583-680 INTERMEDIATE SWAHILI II MSHOMBA, ELAINE TR 1030AM-1200PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                AFST 586-680 ADVANCED SWAHILI II MSHOMBA, ELAINE TR 0900AM-1030AM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  AFST 588-680 ADVANCED YORUBA II AWOYALE, YIWOLA TR 0700PM-0900PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    AFST 591-680 SWAHILI LANG/CULTURE II MSHOMBA, ELAINE TBA TBA- Continuation of Swahili Language & Culture I. Course is taught in Swahili and focuses on reading/writing skills and speaking/listening skills, as well as structural and cultural information. The course is structured around three thematic units: History, Politics, and Education.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      AFST 597-682 AFR LANG TUTOR:INTERM II: WOLOF-AFR LANG INTER II THIOUNE, MBACKE MW 0500PM-0630PM
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        AFST 597-687 AFR LANG TUTOR:INTERM II TBA TBA-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          AFST 599-687 AFR LANG TUTOR: ADV II: MANINKA-AFR LANG ADV II CANCELED Continuation of AFST 598.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT