Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
AFRC 001-001 Intro Africana Studies Jasmine Johnson MW 12:00 PM-01:30 PM The term Africana emerged in public discourse amid the social, political, and cultural turbulence of the 1960s. The roots of the field, however, are much older,easily reaching back to oral histories and writings during the early days of the Trans-Atlantic African slave trade. The underpinnings of the field continued to grow in the works of enslaved Africans, abolitionists and social critics of the nineteenth century, and evolved in the twentieth century by black writers, journalists, activists, and educators as they sought to document African descended people's lives. Collectively, their work established African Studies as a discipline,epistemological standpoint and political practice dedicated to understanding the multiple trajectories and experiences of black people in the world throughout history. As an ever-transforming field of study, this course will examine the genealogy, major discourses, and future trajectory of Africana Studies. Using primary sources such as maps and letters, as well as literature and performance, our study of Africana will begin with continental Africa, move across the Atlantic during the middle passage and travel from the coasts of Bahia in the 18th century to the streets of Baltimore in the 21st century. The course is constructed around major themes in Black intellectual thought including: retentions and transferal, diaspora, black power, meanings of blackness, uplift and nationalism. While attending to narratives and theories that concern African descended people in the United States, the course is uniquely designed with a focus on gender and provides context for the African diasporic experience in the Caribbean and Latin America. Humanities & Social Science Sector
AFRC 002-401 Intro To Sociology Benjamin J Shestakofsky MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. SOCI001401 Society Sector
Cultural Diversity in the US
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Permission Needed From Department
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=AFRC002401
AFRC 002-402 Introduction To Sociology R 08:30 AM-09:30 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. SOCI001402 Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
AFRC 002-403 Introduction To Sociology R 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. SOCI001403 Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
AFRC 002-404 Introduction To Sociology R 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. SOCI001404 Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
AFRC 002-405 Introduction To Sociology F 08:30 AM-09:30 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. SOCI001405 Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
AFRC 002-406 Introduction To Sociology F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. SOCI001406 Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
AFRC 002-407 Introduction To Sociology F 01:45 PM-02:45 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. SOCI001407 Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
AFRC 002-601 Intro To Sociology Lauren Elizabeth Harris M 05:15 PM-08:15 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. SOCI001601 Society Sector
Cultural Diversity in the US
AFRC 006-401 Race & Ethnic Relations Tukufu Zuberi TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM The course will focus on race and ethnicity in the United States. We begin with a brief history of racial categorization and immigration to the U.S. The course continues by examining a number of topics including racial and ethnic identity, interracial and interethnic friendships and marriage, racial attitudes, mass media images, residential segregation, educational stratification, and labor market outcomes. The course will include discussions of African Americans, Whites, Hispanics, and Asian Americans and Multiracials. SOCI006401, URBS160401, ASAM006401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
AFRC 011-401 Urban Sociology Chenoa A. Flippen TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course is a comprehensive introduction to the sociological study of urban areas. This includes more general topics as the rise of cities and theories urbanism, as well as more specific areas of inquiry, including American urbanism, segregation, urban poverty, suburbanization and sprawl, neighborhoods and crime, and immigrant ghettos. The course will also devote significant attention to globalization and the process of urbanization in less developed counties. SOCI011401, URBS112401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=AFRC011401
AFRC 050-401 World Musics & Cultures TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. ANTH022401, FOLK022401, MUSC050401 Arts & Letters Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=AFRC050401
AFRC 050-402 World Musics & Cultures Juliet Pascal Glazer TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. ANTH022402, FOLK022402, MUSC050402 Arts & Letters Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=AFRC050402
AFRC 076-401 Africa Since 1800 Lee V Cassanelli MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Survey of major themes, events, and personalities in African history from the early nineteenth century through the 1960s. Topics include abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism, impact of colonial rule, African resistance, religious and cultural movements, rise of naturalism and pan-Africanism, issues of ethnicity and "tribalism" in modern Africa. HIST076401 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=AFRC076401
AFRC 076-402 Africa Since 1800 F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Survey of major themes, events, and personalities in African history from the early nineteenth century through the 1960s. Topics include abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism, impact of colonial rule, African resistance, religious and cultural movements, rise of naturalism and pan-Africanism, issues of ethnicity and "tribalism" in modern Africa. HIST076402 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
AFRC 076-403 Africa Since 1800 F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Survey of major themes, events, and personalities in African history from the early nineteenth century through the 1960s. Topics include abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism, impact of colonial rule, African resistance, religious and cultural movements, rise of naturalism and pan-Africanism, issues of ethnicity and "tribalism" in modern Africa. HIST076403 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
AFRC 076-404 Africa Since 1800 F 01:45 PM-02:45 PM Survey of major themes, events, and personalities in African history from the early nineteenth century through the 1960s. Topics include abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism, impact of colonial rule, African resistance, religious and cultural movements, rise of naturalism and pan-Africanism, issues of ethnicity and "tribalism" in modern Africa. HIST076404 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
AFRC 076-405 Africa Since 1800 F 01:45 PM-02:45 PM Survey of major themes, events, and personalities in African history from the early nineteenth century through the 1960s. Topics include abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism, impact of colonial rule, African resistance, religious and cultural movements, rise of naturalism and pan-Africanism, issues of ethnicity and "tribalism" in modern Africa. HIST076405 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
AFRC 076-406 Africa Since 1800 R 05:15 PM-06:15 PM Survey of major themes, events, and personalities in African history from the early nineteenth century through the 1960s. Topics include abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism, impact of colonial rule, African resistance, religious and cultural movements, rise of naturalism and pan-Africanism, issues of ethnicity and "tribalism" in modern Africa. HIST076406 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
AFRC 076-407 Africa Since 1800 R 05:15 PM-06:15 PM Survey of major themes, events, and personalities in African history from the early nineteenth century through the 1960s. Topics include abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism, impact of colonial rule, African resistance, religious and cultural movements, rise of naturalism and pan-Africanism, issues of ethnicity and "tribalism" in modern Africa. HIST076407 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
AFRC 078-401 Urb Univ-Community Rltns: Faculty-Student Collaborative Action Seminar in Urban Univ-Comm Relations Ira Harkavy W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This seminar helps students develop their capacity to solve strategic, real-world problems by working collaboratively in the classroom, on campus, and in the West Philadelphia community. Students develop proposals that demonstrate how a Penn undergraduate education might better empower students to produce, not simply "consume," societally-useful knowledge, as well as to function as caring, contributing citizens of a democratic society. Their proposals help contribute to the improvement of education on campus and in the community, as well as to the improvement of university-community relations. Additionally, students provide college access support at Paul Robeson High School for one hour each week. HIST173401, URBS178401 Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Permission Needed From Instructor
An Academically Based Community Serv Course
Benjamin Franklin Seminars
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=AFRC078401
AFRC 081-401 African-American Lit An introduction to African-American literature, typically ranging across a wide spectrum of moments, methodologies, and ideological postures, from Reconstruction and the Harlem Renaissance to the Civil Rights Movement. Most versions of this course will begin in the 19th century; some versions of the course will concentrate only on the modern period. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. ENGL081401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
AFRC 120-401 Social Statistics Michel Guillot MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. SOCI120401 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
AFRC 120-402 Social Statistics R 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. SOCI120402 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
AFRC 120-403 Social Statistics R 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. SOCI120403 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
AFRC 120-404 Social Statistics F 08:30 AM-09:30 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. SOCI120404 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
AFRC 120-405 Social Statistics F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. SOCI120405 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
AFRC 135-401 Law & Society Hocine Fetni TR 05:15 PM-06:45 PM After introducing students to the major theoretical concepts concerning law and society, significant controversial societal issues that deal with law and the legal systems both domestically and internationally will be examined. Class discussions will focus on issues involving civil liberties, the organization of courts, legislatures, the legal profession and administrative agencies. Although the focus will be on law in the United States, law and society in other countries of Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America will be covered in a comparative context. Readings include research, reports, statutes and cases. SOCI135401 Cultural Diversity in the US https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=AFRC135401
AFRC 154-401 Race,Space in Am Hist Mia E Bay CANCELED This course provides a historical introduction to America's racial and ethnic groupings by examining the social, spatial and historical forces that have defined these groups. Weekly lectures and readings trace American racial formations, identities and experiences from the age of Columbus to the present day. Following the work of historians and geographers who emphasize the importance of space and place in constructions of racial and ethnic identity, most of the class readings chart the evolution of such identities within specific regions or communities. Early readings illuminate the origins of categories such as "white," black, "Native American" and "Asian" by exploring the colonial encounters in which these identities first took shape; while later readings trace how these identities have been maintained and/or changed over time. Less a product of racial attitudes than of economic and political interests, early American conceptions of race first took shape amidst contests over land and labor that pitted European immigrants against the indigenous peoples of North America, and ultimately led to the development of racial slavery. Colonial legal distinctions between Christians and Heathens were supplanted by legislation that defined people by race and ethnicity. Over time these distinctions were reinforced by a variety of other forces. Distinctive from place to place, America's racial and ethnic groupings have been shaped and reshaped by regional economies such as the slave South, political initiatives such as Indian Removal and Chinese Exclusion Acts, a changing national immigration policy, and sexual and social intermixture and assimilation. Course readings will examine the links between race, region, labor, law, immigration, politics, sexuality and the construction and character of racialized spaces and places in America. HIST151401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
AFRC 172-401 The American South MW 05:15 PM-06:45 PM This course will cover southern culture and history from 1607-1860, from Jamestown to secession. It traces the rise of slavery and plantation society, the growth of Southern sectionalism and its explosion into Civil War. HIST170401 History & Tradition Sector
AFRC 190-401 Introduction To Africa David K. Amponsah TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course provides an introduction to the study of Africa in all its diversity and complexity. Our focus is cultural, geographical, and historical: we will seek to understand Africa s current place in the world political and economic order and learn about the various social and physical factors that have influenced the historical trajectory of the continent. We study the cultural formations and empires that emerged in Africa before European colonial invasion and then how colonialism reshaped those sociocultural forms. We ll learn about the unique kinds of kinship and religion in precolonial Africa and the changes brought about by the spread of Islam and Christianity. Finally, we ll take a close look at contemporary issues such as ethnic violence, migration, popular culture and poverty, and we'll debate the various approaches to understanding those issues. ANTH190401 Society Sector
AFRC 197-401 Era of Revolutions in the Atlantic World Roquinaldo Ferreira CANCELED This class examines the global ramifications of the era of Atlantic revolutions from the 1770s through the 1820s. With a particular focus on French Saint Domingue and Latin America, it provides an overview of key events and individuals from the period. Along the way, it assesses the impact of the American and French revolutions on the breakdown of colonial regimes across the Americas. Students will learn how to think critically about citizenship, constitutional power, and independence movements throughout the Atlantic world. Slavery and the transatlantic slave trade were seriously challenged in places such as Haiti, and the class investigates the appropriation and circulation of revolutionary ideas by enslaved people and other subaltern groups. HIST197401, LALS197401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
AFRC 215-401 Religion & Colonial Rule in Africa Cheikh Ante MBAcke Babou R 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This course is cross listed with HIST 214 (America after 1800: Advanced Benjamin Franklin Seminar) when the subject matter is related to African, African American or African diaspora issues. See the Africana Studies Program's website at www.sas.upenn.edu/africana for a description of the current offerings. HIST216401 Cross Cultural Analysis Benjamin Franklin Seminars https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=AFRC215401
AFRC 223-401 Storytelling in Africa Pamela Blakely T 05:15 PM-08:15 PM African storytellers entertain, educate, and comment obliquely on sensitive and controversial issues in artful performance. The course considers motifs, structures, and interpretations of trickster tales and other folktales, storytellers' performance skills, and challenges to presenting oral narrative in written and film texts. The course also explores ways traditional storytelling has inspired African social reformers and artists, particularly filmmakers. Students will have opportunities to view films in class. ANTH223401, CIMS222401 Cross Cultural Analysis https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=AFRC223401
AFRC 229-402 Archives and Afterlives of Slavery Bradley L Craig R 10:15 AM-01:15 PM Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. HIST231402 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=AFRC229402
AFRC 257-401 Caribbean Mus & Diaspora Timothy Rommen R 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This course considers Caribbean musics within a broad and historical framework.Caribbean musical practices are explored by illustrating the many ways that aesthetics, ritual, communication, religion, and social structure are embodied in and contested through performance. These initial inquiries open onto an investigation of a range of theoretical concepts that become particularly pertinent in Caribbean contexts--concepts such as post-colonialism, migration, ethnicity, hybridity, syncretism, and globalization. Each of these concepts, moreover, will be explored with a view toward understanding its connections to the central analytical paradigm of the course--diaspora. Throughout the course, we will listen to many different styles and repertories of music ranging from calpso to junkanoo, from rumba to merengue, and from dance hall to zouk. We will then work to understand them not only in relation to the readings that frame our discussions but also in relation to our own North-American contexts of music consumption and production. LALS258401, ANTH256401, MUSC257401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=AFRC257401
AFRC 274-401 Faces of Jihad in African Islam Cheikh Ante MBAcke Babou TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course is designed to provide the students with a broad understanding of the history of Islam in Africa. The focus will be mostly on West Africa, but we will also look at developments in other regions of the continent. We will explore Islam not only as religious practice but also as ideology and an instrument of social change. We will examine the process of islamization in Africa and the different uses of Jihad. Topics include prophetic jihad, jihad of the pen and the different varieties of jihad of the sword throughout the history in Islam in sub-Saharan Africa. HIST275401 Cross Cultural Analysis https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=AFRC274401
AFRC 276-401 Exploring African American Life and Culture in Slavery Heather A Williams MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course will examine the lives of enslaved African Americans in the United States, both in the North and the South. We will engage historiographical debates, and tackle questions that have long concerned historians. For example, if slaves were wrenched from families and traded, could they sustain family relationships? If slaves worked from sun-up until sun-down, how could they create music? We will engage with primary and secondary sources to expand our understandings of values, cultural practices, and daily life among enslaved people. Topics will include: literacy, family, labor, food, music and dance, hair and clothing, religion, material culture, resistance, and memories of slavery. Several disciplines including History, Archaeology, Literature, and Music, will help us in our explorations. Written, oral, and artistic texts for the course will provide us with rich sources for exploring the nuances of slave life, and students will have opportunities to delve deeply into topics that are of particular interest to them. This course will also count as the AFRC 176 requirement for the AFRC major. HIST274401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=AFRC276401
AFRC 277-401 Penn Slavery Project Res CANCELED This research seminar provides students with instruction in basic historical methods and an opportunity to conduct collaborative primary source research into the University of Pennsylvania's historic connections to slavery. After an initial orientation to archival research, students will plunge in to doing actual research at the Kislak Center, the University Archives, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the American Philosophical Society, the Library Company, and various online sources. During the final month of the semester, students will begin drafting research reports and preparing for a public presentation of the work. During the semester, there will be opportunities to collaborate with a certified genealogist, a data management and website expert, a consultant on public programming, and a Penn graduate whose research has been integral to the Penn Slavery Project. HIST273401
AFRC 281-401 Tpcs African-Amer Lit In this advanced seminar, students will be introduced to a variety of approaches to African American literatures, and to a wide spectrum of methodologies and ideological postures (for example, The Black Arts Movement). The course will present an assortment of emphases, some of them focused on geography (for example, the Harlem Renaissance), others focused on genre (autobiography, poetry or drama), the politics of gender and class, or a particular grouping of authors. Previous versions of this course have included "African American Autobigraphy," "Backgrounds of African American Literature," "The Black Narrative" (beginning with eighteenth century slave narratives and working toward contemporary literature), as well as seminars on urban spaces, jazz, migration, oral narratives, black Christianity, and African-American music. See Africana Studies Department's website at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. ENGL281401
AFRC 294-601 Facing America William D Schmenner MW 05:15 PM-06:45 PM This course explores the visual history of race in the United States as both self-fashioning and cultural mythology by examining the ways that conceptions of Native American, Latino, and Asian identity, alongside ideas of Blackness and Whiteness, have combined to create the various cultural ideologies of class, gender, and sexuality that remain evident in historical visual and material culture. We also investigate the ways that these creations have subsequently helped to launch new visual entertainments, including museum spectacles, blackface minstrelsy, and early film, from the colonial period through the 1940s. ASAM294601, ARTH674601, ARTH274601, CIMS293601, LALS274601 Cultural Diversity in the US Course Online: Synchronous Format
AFRC 325-401 August Wilson and Beyond Suzana Berger
Herman Beavers
MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM The purpose of this course is to engage students in the rigorous process of mining experiences for material that can be transformed into a public performance piece. In-class writing, group discussions, and field work in the Philadelphia area. AUGUST WILSON AND BEYOND. The people need to know the story. See how they fit into it. See what part they play. - August Wilson, King Hedley II. In this seminar, students will read groundbreaking playwright August Wilson's 20th Century Cycle: ten plays that form an iconic picture of African American traumas, triumphs, and traditions through the decades, told through the lens of Pittsburgh's Hill District neighborhood. Other readings include supporting material on Wilson's work and African American theatre, the works of contemporary playwrights whom Wilson has influenced (such as Suzan-Lori Parks and Tarell Alvin McCraney), and context on Penn's relationship with West Philadelphia. As an Academically Based Community Service (ABCS) course,this seminar gives students the opportunity to enhance their understanding of the plays, and history and culture that shaped them, by forming meaningful relationships with West Philadelphia residents. Wilson's plays provide the bridge between the two groups. The course culminates with students writing an original theatre piece inspired by the readings and relationships, which they will share at an end-of-semester performance. ENGL380401 Cultural Diversity in the US An Academically Based Community Serv Course
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
Benjamin Franklin Seminars
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=AFRC325401
AFRC 400-401 Blacks in American Film and Television Donald E Bogle M 05:15 PM-08:15 PM This course is an examination and analysis of the changing images and achievements of African Americans in motion pictures and television. The first half of the course focuses on African-American film images from the early years of D.W. Griffith's "renegade bucks" in The Birth of a Nation (1915); to the comic servants played by Steppin Fetchit, Hattie McDaniel, and others during the Depression era; to the post-World War II New Negro heroes and heroines of Pinky (1949) and The Defiant Ones (1958); to the rise of the new movement of African American directors such as Spike Lee (Do the Right Thing), Julie Dash (Daughters of the Dust), Charles Burnett, (To Sleep With Anger) and John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood). The second half explores television images from the early sitcoms "Amos 'n Andy" and "Beulah" to the "Cosby Show," "Fresh Prince of Bel Air," and "Martin." Foremost this course will examine Black stereotypes in American films and television--and the manner in which those stereotypes have reflected national attitudes and outlooks during various historical periods. The in-class screenings and discussions will include such films as Show Boat (1936), the independently produced "race movies" of the 1930s and 1940s, Cabin in the Sky (1943), The Defiant Ones (1958), Imitation of Life (the 1959 remake) & Super Fly (1972). CIMS370401 Cultural Diversity in the US
AFRC 420-401 US and Human Rights: Policies and Practices Hocine Fetni M 05:15 PM-08:15 PM Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's course list at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offering. After an examination of the philosophical, legal, and political perspectives on Human Rights, this course will focus on US policies and practices relevant to Human Rights. Toward that end, emphasis will be placed on both the domestic and the international aspects of Human Rights as reflected in US policies and practices. Domestically, the course will discuss (1) the process of incorporating the International Bill of Human Rights into the American legal system and (2) the US position on and practices regarding the political, civil, economic, social, and cultural rights of minorities and various other groups within the US. Internationally, the course will examine US Human Rights policies toward Africa. Specific cases of Rwanda, Kenya, South Africa and Egypt, as well as other cases from the continent, will be presented in the assessment of US successes and failures in the pursuit of its Human Rights strategy in Africa. Readings will include research papers, reports, statutes, treaties, and cases. SOCI460401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=AFRC420401
AFRC 436-401 Love, Anger, Madness: History and Silences in Modern Haiti Grace Louise B Sanders Johnson M 10:15 AM-01:15 PM On the stage of modern world history, Haiti plays the unique role as both the exceptionally victorious and tragic character. This course interrogates archival documents, oral histories, historical texts, and prose created within the nation and her diaspora in order to establish a nuanced image of the projection of Haiti's modern history. Using two classic Haitian texts, Marie Vieux-Chauvet's Love, Anger, Madness (1968) and Michel-Rolph Trouillot's Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History (1995),this course examines how, why,and to what end Haiti's history and popular narratives about the country have served to construct and dismantle global movements, popular culture, and meanings of race, gender, and citizenship in the Americas. In our historical examination, we will question some of the iconic representations of Haiti through literature that deepen the affective historical profile of Haiti with interrogations of culture, sexuality, political, and media performance. Students will become familiar with the post -colonial history of Haiti and the region, meanings of race, and the production of history. The course is a research and historical methods seminar. Students will conduct archival research and write narratives from primary source material. This course qualifies as a "methods" course for Africana Studies undergraduate majors and minors. LALS437401, GSWS436401, HIST436401
AFRC 437-401 Race & Criminal Justice Marie Gottschalk T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Why are African Americans and some other minority groups disproportionately incarcerated and subjected to penal sanctions? What are the political, social and economic consequences for individuals, communities, and the wider society of mass incarceration in the United States? What types of reforms of the criminal justice system are desirable and possible? This advanced seminar analyzes the connection between race, crime, punishment, and politics in the United States. The primary focus is on the role of race in explaining why the country's prison population increased six-fold since the early 1970s and why the United States today has the highest incarceration rate in the world. The class will likely take field trips to a maximum-security jail in Philadelphia and to a state prison in the Philadelphia suburbs. AFRC638401, PSCI437401, PSCI638401 Permission Needed From Instructor
AFRC 509-401 Reading Arabic Manuscrpt: Reading Historical Arabic Manuscript Ali B. Ali-Dinar R 03:30 PM-06:30 PM Arabic language is used by many societies not only in communication but also in correspondence and in documenting the affairs of their daily lives. Arabic script is adopted by many groups whose native languages are not Arabic, in writing their languages before some moved to the Roman alphabet. In many historical documents specific style of writing and handwriting are dominant. This specificity is influenced by the dialectical variations, the historical development of each region and the level of Arabic literacy and use. The aims of this course which will focus on the Arabic writing tradition of Africa and the Middle East are as follows: (1) Reading and interpreting hand-written Arabic documents from Africa and the Middle East with focus on different historical eras. (2) In-depth understanding of the historical and language contexts of the selected documents. (3) Examining different handwriting styles that are in vogue in Africa and the Middle East. ARAB580401
AFRC 514-301 African and the Indian Ocean Ali B. Ali-Dinar T 03:30 PM-06:30 PM The Indian Ocean region represents an area with interwoven centuries of interactions, politically, historically, geographically and culturally. This area has witnessed continuous migrations of peoples, the circulation of goods and ideas, and the interaction with foreign forces. The Indian Ocean world has served as an epicenter of global economy in pre-modern world and as such, it gave rise to trading networks and political empires. As part of the Indian Ocean World, the eastern and southern shores of Africa are both the recipients and the transmitters of cultural and political icons. The existence of many islands that separate Africa from Asia stand as hybrid cultures that are influenced by forces from different continents. Political and cultural relations between African regions and the rest of the Indian Ocean world are evident with the presence of African-descent populations in these places, as well as the prevalent of cultural practices of African origin. Signs of interaction between the Indian Ocean world and the African shores are apparent in several archeological sites, as well as in the cultural practices of religion, language, architecture and modes of dress. The European colonial expansion, has allowed the populations in the Indian Ocean world to share strategies during their independence movements to thwart western political hegemony. With the current advanced forms of globalization, this region is moving more towards economic and political cooperation and in addressing the transnational natural and man-made threats.
AFRC 530-301 Black Performance Theory Jasmine Johnson CANCELED In his 1995 documentary Black Is, Black Ain t Marlon Riggs traces a black cultural tradition while simultaneously destabilizing the very notion of blackness itself. He testifies that: Black is black, and black is blue. Black is bright. Black is you. Black can do you in. In Riggs configuration, black is a color, black is a feeling, black is a sound, black is materiality, and black is a life sentence. In an effort to raise critical questions around blackness, performance, race, and feeling, this course follows in the tradition of Riggs work. In other words, this graduate level course examines the notion of blackness through theorizations of performance. It pursues the following questions: What is blackness? How is blackness embodied, felt, heard, represented, and seen through performance? How is black performance political? Discussions and written work will interrogate the slipperiness of, desire for, and policing of blackness in order to trouble conceptions of race as a biological essence. Organized by keywords in the field of Black Performance Theory - and exploring varying performance forms (the play, the dance, the film, the photograph, the performance of everyday life, the television program, the exhibit, and even the tweet) - This course foregrounds the micro-politics through which black racialized subjects are shaped in the realm of culture. Performances will be consulted each meeting which we will use to interpret and complicate the day's readings. In examining blackness through a number of performance mediums, we will consider the politics of black creative labor and the processes of racialization produced through black bodies.
AFRC 537-640 Blacks in Corporate America Kimberly C Torres T 05:15 PM-07:55 PM This course is designed to be an exploration of the rise of the new Black elite and their contributions to business in America, their lifestyles, and the intraracial diversity of their socioeconomic origins. Little social science research has considered the unique location of Black American professionals within America's racialized class structure. Despite marked gains since the Civil Rights Movement, American Blacks still comprise just 2% of executives and senior manager-level employees, and just a handful (<1%) of Fortune 500 companies are led by Black CEOs. Notably, Black women currently account for only 1.6% of vice presidents and 1.4% of C-suite executives compared to white men who hold 57% and 68% of those positions, respectively. Together, we will examine the origins and worldviews of the old Black elite compared to the new Black professional class and how their variegated racial, ethnic, and class experiences in corporate America remain tethered to the "peculiar" history of Black slavery and our enduring racial stratification system. Whatever their socioeconomic origins, Black professionals are well-credentialed to assume leadership roles both inside and outside the Black community in the U.S. The use of the delimiter 'Black' nonetheless recognizes how race interacts with social class to prevent Black Americans from attaining social and economic parity with whites even at the top of the class hierarchy; for Blacks, social class is racialized concept intrinsically linked to the legacy of structural racism in all its economic, political, cultural, and social manifestations Bearing all this in mind: Who is the new Black professional class? What are their origins and how do they reflect the ideals and attitudes of 21st Century Black America? What are their contributions to corporate America? In what ways does structural racism differentially impact their career trajectories and structural integration into the corporate mainstream? How do they cope with white racism and lack of representation beyond middle management? And, what lessons can we learn from their professional and personal experiences to shed light on the enduring legacy of Black inequality and the structural impediments all Blacks in the U.S. face as they strive to acquire intergenerational mobility? We will study the historical presence of Blacks in certain industries since 1865, how racial, ethnic, gender, and class diversity within Black America have affected access and opportunities for advancement, as well as the legacy of deliberate federal programs and policies that have stymied Black professional advancement. Particularly salient to our discussion here is the steering of Blacks into Undergraduates Need Permission
AFRC 547-401 Topics in Religion: Black Relig & Pop Cultr Anthea Butler M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This course deals with various religious topics, such as Mass Religious Conversion. RELS501401
AFRC 563-401 Old Egyptian David P Silverman MW 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course is an introduction to the language of the Egyptian Old Kingdom. The grammar of the period will be introduced during the early part of the semester, using Ededl's ALTAGYPTISCHE GRAMMATIK as the basic reference. Other grammatical studies to be utilized will include works by Allen, Baer, Polotsky, Satzinger, Gilula, Doret, and Silverman. The majority of time in the course will be devoted to reading varied textual material: the unpublished inscriptions in the tomb of the Old Kingdom offical Kapure--on view in the collection of the University Museum; several autobiographical inscriptions as recorded by Sethe in URKUNDEN I; and a letter in hieratic (Baer, ZAS 93, 1966, 1-9). ANEL563401
AFRC 575-401 Tpe: Psychoeducational Interactions with Black Males Eric K Grimes
Howard C. Stevenson
Robert E Carter
R 03:30 PM-05:30 PM This course is designed to introduce students to innovative approaches to the psychology of education, especially with regard to populations from at-risk contexts, sociocultural dimensions of education, and social-emotional learning. EDUC575401 Cultural Diversity in the US
AFRC 602-401 Stereotype Threat, Impostor Phenomenon, and African Americans Ufuoma Abiola R 07:00 PM-09:00 PM This course critically examines stereotype threat and impostor phenomenon as they relate to African Americans. Both stereotype threat and impostor phenomenon negatively affect African Americans. The apprehension experienced by African Americans that they might behave in a manner that confirms an existing negative cultural stereotype is stereotype threat, which usually results in reduced effectiveness in African Americans' performance. Stereotype threat is linked with impostor phenomenon. Impostor phenomenon is an internal experience of intellectual phoniness in authentically talented individuals, in which they doubt their accomplishments and fear being exposed as a fraud. While stereotype threat relies on broad generalization, the impostor phenomenon describes feelings of personal inadequacy, especially in high-achieving African Americans. This course will explore the evolving meanings connected to both stereotype threat and impostor phenomenon in relation to African Americans. EDUC538401
AFRC 638-401 Race & Criminal Justice Marie Gottschalk T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM AFRC437401, PSCI437401, PSCI638401 Undergraduates Need Permission
AFRC 670-401 Oral History Ann C. Farnsworth-Alvear
Grace Louise B Sanders Johnson
M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM From wax cylinders to reel-to-reel to digital video, recording technologies expanded the historical profession dramatically during the twentieth century, a process that is ongoing in the present. We will read some classics, such as Barbara Myerhoff's Number Our Days and Alessandro Portelli's Death of Luigi Trastulli, as well as scholarly pieces aimed at working historians, and we will discuss public history approaches, such as the video recordings collected by the Library of Congress's Civil Rights History Project and other internet-based collections. This course centers on methodology - students will learn about 'best practices' in the field and will work toward creating an interview record that can be housed in an archive and accessed by other researchers. All students will use digital video and will practice creating accessible links to both video and audio material, although the interviewees involved may choose an audio-only format. NOTE: Each person interviewed maintains rights to the interview material unless she or he explicitly donates those rights to an archive. Interviewees' privacy and intellectual property rights will be respected by all seminar participants. LALS670401
AFRC 706-301 Introduction To Africa and African Diaspora Thought David K. Amponsah R 12:00 PM-03:00 PM This course examines the processes by which African peoples have established epistemological, cosmological, and religious systems both prior to and after the institution of Western slavery. Undergraduates Need Permission
For PhD Students Only
AFRC 723-401 Multicultural Issues in Education Oreoluwa Badaki T 07:30 PM-09:30 PM This course examines critical issues, problems, and perspectives in multicultural education. Intended to focus on access to literacy and educational opportunity, the course will engage class members in discussions around a variety of topics in educational practice, research, and policy. Specifically, the course will (1) review theoretical frameworks in multicultural education, (2) analyze the issues of race, racism, and culture in historical and contemporary perspective, and (3) identify obstacles to participation in the educational process by diverse cultural and ethnic groups. Students will be required to complete field experiences and classroom activities that enable them to reflect on their own belief systems, practices, and educational experiences. EDUC723401
AFRC 723-402 Multicultural Issues in Education R 07:30 PM-09:30 PM This course examines critical issues, problems, and perspectives in multicultural education. Intended to focus on access to literacy and educational opportunity, the course will engage class members in discussions around a variety of topics in educational practice, research, and policy. Specifically, the course will (1) review theoretical frameworks in multicultural education, (2) analyze the issues of race, racism, and culture in historical and contemporary perspective, and (3) identify obstacles to participation in the educational process by diverse cultural and ethnic groups. Students will be required to complete field experiences and classroom activities that enable them to reflect on their own belief systems, practices, and educational experiences. EDUC723402
AFRC 770-401 New Directions in Twenty-First Century Black Studies Margo N. Crawford R 03:30 PM-06:30 PM How does Elizabeth Alexanders poem Praise Song for the Day, written for the inauguration of Barack Obama, relate to Amiri Barakas 9/11 poem Somebody Blew America? This seminar will explore the unnaming and experimentation that shape African American literature and theory in the early years of the 21st century. frameworks of the seminar will include the post-9/11 novel, the poetics of the black, black abstraction, twenty-first century practices of the black diaspora Age of Obama turn to the satirical. Critical texts such as How to See a Work Total Darkness and Abstractionist Aesthetics will be as central as cutting edgesuch as The Psychic Hold of Slavery and signature essays such as On Failing to the Past Present. This course will focus on the new literary voices that have the 21st century and, also, writers whose 21st century art is the late stage ofliterary trajectory. Special attention will be given to Toni Morrison, Colson Whitehead,Octavia Butler, Claudia Rankine, Mat Johnson, and Paul Beatty. ENGL770401 For PhD Students Only
AFRC 771-401 Sem in African-Amer Musc Guthrie P Ramsey T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Seminar on selected topics in African American Music. See department website (under course tab) for current term course description: https://music.sas.upenn.edu MUSC770401